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Re: [MOB-Montana] Re: New binoculars needed, any suggestions?

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  • GypsyKare
    ... ____________________________________________________________________________________ Now that s room service! Choose from over 150,000 hotels in 45,000
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 6, 2007
      --- Jim Greaves <lbvi.man@...> wrote:

      > I agree with the "don't go above 9x", though 10x is
      > acceptable and
      > there are many fine binos out there for under $300.
      > I've used Swift
      > Audubon 8.5x44 since the mid-1970's for 99% of bird
      > watching,
      > including work, now on my 4th version/pair of that
      > bino, which is 10+
      > ounces lighter than the first ones I owned AND
      > waterproof. If you go
      > with that one avoid the straight tube model, as it
      > does not rest on
      > face very comfortably (focus wheel hits bridge of
      > nose). One does not
      > likely need the ED version of this model (an extra
      > $150 or so)
      > because the light coming through is sufficient for
      > everyone - exit
      > pupil is the critical factor for low light viewing,
      > these have 5.2mm
      > (divide larger number by smaller to get diameter of
      > light beam
      > reaching eye). You can see it when holding bino a
      > foot from face
      > viewing as you would through the eye-pieces, the
      > exit pupil is that
      > spot of light, which in order to be most effective
      > must be at or
      > larger than diameter your pupils dilate in low light
      > - any additional
      > diameter is wasted on anyone (generally) over 40 as
      > our pupils tend
      > not to open as wide as we age. I like Nikon Monarch
      > as well, and have
      > a new older version of the Swarovski 8x30 which is a
      > fine model, but
      > be sure to get the "real" waterproof version -- go
      > with any bino
      > that's waterproof if you plan to help with CBC and
      > other bird treks
      > that are set in stone where you might not be able to
      > avoid rain or
      > snow - Jim Greaves
      >
      >




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    • Kare(n)
      Thanks so much to all of you for the great suggestions!!!! You are one great group of folks!!!!! I have a lot to learn being new to birding, and I so
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 6, 2007
        Thanks so much to all of you for the great suggestions!!!! You are
        one great group of folks!!!!! I have a lot to learn being new to
        birding, and I so appreciate all the feedback and help you always have
        to offer~~ Kare(n)


        --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Greaves" <lbvi.man@...> wrote:
        >
        > I agree with the "don't go above 9x", though 10x is acceptable and
        > there are many fine binos out there for under $300. I've used Swift
        > Audubon 8.5x44 since the mid-1970's for 99% of bird watching,
        > including work, now on my 4th version/pair of that bino, which is 10+
        > ounces lighter than the first ones I owned AND waterproof. If you go
        > with that one avoid the straight tube model, as it does not rest on
        > face very comfortably (focus wheel hits bridge of nose). One does not
        > likely need the ED version of this model (an extra $150 or so)
        > because the light coming through is sufficient for everyone - exit
        > pupil is the critical factor for low light viewing, these have 5.2mm
        > (divide larger number by smaller to get diameter of light beam
        > reaching eye). You can see it when holding bino a foot from face
        > viewing as you would through the eye-pieces, the exit pupil is that
        > spot of light, which in order to be most effective must be at or
        > larger than diameter your pupils dilate in low light - any additional
        > diameter is wasted on anyone (generally) over 40 as our pupils tend
        > not to open as wide as we age. I like Nikon Monarch as well, and have
        > a new older version of the Swarovski 8x30 which is a fine model, but
        > be sure to get the "real" waterproof version -- go with any bino
        > that's waterproof if you plan to help with CBC and other bird treks
        > that are set in stone where you might not be able to avoid rain or
        > snow - Jim Greaves
        >
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