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Re: ID Request (Grasshopper Sparrow?)

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  • BethM
    Nice diagnostic shot of a fairly plain sparrow - yes, grasshopper. You caught the yellow lores and the yellow spot at the bend in the wing, which are often not
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 7, 2013
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      Nice diagnostic shot of a fairly plain sparrow - yes, grasshopper. You caught the yellow lores and the yellow spot at the bend in the wing, which are often not visible in the field. Big billed, flat headed, and plain breasted sparrow. With it's high-pitched song, many people only know it is singing by seeing the head thrown back with open bill - but an interesting, insect-like song.
      Beth Madden
      Livingston

      --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com, "pittendrigh" <sandy.pittendrigh@...> wrote:
      >
      > Saw this bird yesterday on a high dry sage brush bench near Three Forks Montana. At noon in a harsh bright hot day sun. It was well over 90 degrees.
      >
      > ....I'm new at this. Will BB tags work here? So I can show an image at a remote location?
      >
      > [img]http://montana-riverboats.com/fragments/Birds/Montana-birds/Bench-road/_PIC5314=Grashopper-sparrow.jpg%5b/img]
      >
    • Stevan Hawkins
      Beth: What is annoying is that the National Geographic, Crossley, and Sibley-national field guides does not say a word about the yellow in the bend of the
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 8, 2013
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        Beth:

         

        What is annoying is that the National Geographic, Crossley, and Sibley-national field guides does not say a word about the yellow in the bend of the wing.  The Stokes-national field guide mentions the yellow in the wing's bend, but does not show it all that well.  In the field that trait is not all that hard to find when a person encounters Grasshopper Sparrows.  I learned about that trait from a banding manual.

         

        Later!

         

        Steve

         

        Stevan Hawkins

        San Antonio TX

         

         

         

        From: MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of BethM
        Sent: Sunday, July 07, 2013 6:32 PM
        To: MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [MOB-Montana] Re: ID Request (Grasshopper Sparrow?)

         

         



        Nice diagnostic shot of a fairly plain sparrow - yes, grasshopper. You caught the yellow lores and the yellow spot at the bend in the wing, which are often not visible in the field. Big billed, flat headed, and plain breasted sparrow. With it's high-pitched song, many people only know it is singing by seeing the head thrown back with open bill - but an interesting, insect-like song.
        Beth Madden
        Livingston

        --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com, "pittendrigh" <sandy.pittendrigh@...> wrote:
        >
        > Saw this bird yesterday on a high dry sage brush bench near Three Forks Montana. At noon in a harsh bright hot day sun. It was well over 90 degrees.
        >
        > ....I'm new at this. Will BB tags work here? So I can show an image at a remote location?
        >
        > [img]http://montana-riverboats.com/fragments/Birds/Montana-birds/Bench-road/_PIC5314=Grashopper-sparrow.jpg[/img]
        >

      • Chuck Carlson
        Steve I’m quite sure the reason this character is not mentioned in the field guides is that it is so seldom seen in the field. I have some excellent photos
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 8, 2013
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          Steve
           
          I’m quite sure the reason this character is not mentioned in the field guides is that it is so seldom seen in the field. I have some excellent photos of Grasshopper Sparrows and the yellow is barely visible in only one of them. Most of the time it is covered by the feathers at the side of the breast. When seen it is a good indicator of Grasshopper, but I think if it was noted in the guides it would be confusing since it is so seldom seen.
           
          The character is noted in Identification Guide to North American Passerines by Pyle, et al. It is also mentioned in Sparrows and Buntings, A Guide to Sparrows and Buntings of North America and the World by Byers et al, as “The greenish-yellow lesser coverts are distinctive but not normally visible in the field”. Beadle and Rising never mention, or picture, the character in either of their books on the sparrows of the United States and Canada.
           
          Chuck Carlson
          Ft. Peck
           
          Sent: Monday, July 08, 2013 8:45 AM
          Subject: RE: [MOB-Montana] Re: ID Request (Grasshopper Sparrow?)
           
           

          Beth:

          What is annoying is that the National Geographic, Crossley, and Sibley-national field guides does not say a word about the yellow in the bend of the wing.  The Stokes-national field guide mentions the yellow in the wing's bend, but does not show it all that well.  In the field that trait is not all that hard to find when a person encounters Grasshopper Sparrows.  I learned about that trait from a banding manual.

          Later!

          < /o>

          Steve

          Stevan Hawkins

          San Antonio TX

        • Jeff Marks
          All of what Chuck says is right on, PLUS a number of other sparrows have yellow in the same place, so it is hardly a diagnostic field mark. *******************
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 8, 2013
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            All of what Chuck says is right on, PLUS a number of other sparrows have yellow in the same place, so it is hardly a diagnostic field mark.
             
            *******************
            Jeff Marks
            4241 SE Liebe Street
            Portland, OR 97206
            503-774-4783
            Birds of Montana Project
            http://mtaudubon.org/
            *******************
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Monday, July 08, 2013 9:14 AM
            Subject: Re: [MOB-Montana] Re: ID Request (Grasshopper Sparrow?)

             

            Steve
             
            I’m quite sure the reason this character is not mentioned in the field guides is that it is so seldom seen in the field. I have some excellent photos of Grasshopper Sparrows and the yellow is barely visible in only one of them. Most of the time it is covered by the feathers at the side of the breast. When seen it is a good indicator of Grasshopper, but I think if it was noted in the guides it would be confusing since it is so seldom seen.
             
            The character is noted in Identification Guide to North American Passerines by Pyle, et al. It is also mentioned in Sparrows and Buntings, A Guide to Sparrows and Buntings of North America and the World by Byers et al, as “The greenish-yellow lesser coverts are distinctive but not normally visible in the field”. Beadle and Rising never mention, or picture, the character in either of their books on the sparrows of the United States and Canada.
             
            Chuck Carlson
            Ft. Peck
             
            Sent: Monday, July 08, 2013 8:45 AM
            Subject: RE: [MOB-Montana] Re: ID Request (Grasshopper Sparrow?)
             
             

            Beth:

            What is annoying is that the National Geographic, Crossley, and Sibley-national field guides does not say a word about the yellow in the bend of the wing.  The Stokes-national field guide mentions the yellow in the wing's bend, but does not show it all that well.  In the field that trait is not all that hard to find when a person encounters Grasshopper Sparrows.  I learned about that trait from a banding manual.

            Later!

            < /o>

            Steve

            Stevan Hawkins

            San Antonio TX

          • BethM
            Jeff, I am curious what other sparrows have it? Beth
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 8, 2013
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              Jeff,
              I am curious what other sparrows have it?
              Beth

              --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Marks" <jeff17_marks@...> wrote:
              >
              > All of what Chuck says is right on, PLUS a number of other sparrows have yellow in the same place, so it is hardly a diagnostic field mark.
              >
              > *******************
              > Jeff Marks
              > 4241 SE Liebe Street
              > Portland, OR 97206
              > 503-774-4783
              > Birds of Montana Project
              > http://mtaudubon.org/<http://mtaudubon.org/>
              > *******************
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Chuck Carlson<mailto:chuckcmt@...>
              > To: MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com<mailto:MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com>
              > Sent: Monday, July 08, 2013 9:14 AM
              > Subject: Re: [MOB-Montana] Re: ID Request (Grasshopper Sparrow?)
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Steve
              >
              > I’m quite sure the reason this character is not mentioned in the field guides is that it is so seldom seen in the field. I have some excellent photos of Grasshopper Sparrows and the yellow is barely visible in only one of them. Most of the time it is covered by the feathers at the side of the breast. When seen it is a good indicator of Grasshopper, but I think if it was noted in the guides it would be confusing since it is so seldom seen.
              >
              > The character is noted in Identification Guide to North American Passerines by Pyle, et al. It is also mentioned in Sparrows and Buntings, A Guide to Sparrows and Buntings of North America and the World by Byers et al, as “The greenish-yellow lesser coverts are distinctive but not normally visible in the field”. Beadle and Rising never mention, or picture, the character in either of their books on the sparrows of the United States and Canada.
              >
              > Chuck Carlson
              > Ft. Peck
              >
              > From: Stevan Hawkins<mailto:shawkins4@...>
              > Sent: Monday, July 08, 2013 8:45 AM
              > To: MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com<mailto:MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com>
              > Subject: RE: [MOB-Montana] Re: ID Request (Grasshopper Sparrow?)
              >
              >
              >
              > Beth:
              >
              >
              > What is annoying is that the National Geographic, Crossley, and Sibley-national field guides does not say a word about the yellow in the bend of the wing. The Stokes-national field guide mentions the yellow in the wing's bend, but does not show it all that well. In the field that trait is not all that hard to find when a person encounters Grasshopper Sparrows. I learned about that trait from a banding manual.
              >
              >
              > Later!
              >
              > < /o>
              >
              > Steve
              >
              >
              > Stevan Hawkins
              >
              > San Antonio TX
              >
            • Jeff Marks
              Hi Beth, Sage, Cassin s, Botteri s, and Bachman s have it, and I think Rufous-crowned, Nelson s, and Henslow s sparrows too. And then there are sparrow-like
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 8, 2013
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                Hi Beth,
                 
                Sage, Cassin's, Botteri's, and Bachman's have it, and I think Rufous-crowned, Nelson's, and Henslow's sparrows too. And then there are sparrow-like birds such as Dickcissel that have it.  There must be others, but I'd have to do some digging.
                 
                Jeff
                 
                *******************
                Jeff Marks
                4241 SE Liebe Street
                Portland, OR 97206
                503-774-4783
                Birds of Montana Project
                http://mtaudubon.org/
                *******************
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: BethM
                Sent: Monday, July 08, 2013 7:28 PM
                Subject: [MOB-Montana] Re: ID Request (Grasshopper Sparrow?)

                 

                Jeff,
                I am curious what other sparrows have it?
                Beth

                --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Marks" <jeff17_marks@...> wrote:
                >
                > All of what Chuck says is right on, PLUS a number of other sparrows have yellow in the same place, so it is hardly a diagnostic field mark.
                >
                > *******************
                > Jeff Marks
                > 4241 SE Liebe Street
                > Portland, OR 97206
                > 503-774-4783
                > Birds of Montana Project
                > http://mtaudubon.org/<http://mtaudubon.org/>
                > *******************
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: Chuck Carlson<mailto:chuckcmt@...>
                > To: MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com<mailto:MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Monday, July 08, 2013 9:14 AM
                > Subject: Re: [MOB-Montana] Re: ID Request (Grasshopper Sparrow?)
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Steve
                >
                > Iâ?Tm quite sure the reason this character is not mentioned in the field guides is that it is so seldom seen in the field. I have some excellent photos of Grasshopper Sparrows and the yellow is barely visible in only one of them. Most of the time it is covered by the feathers at the side of the breast. When seen it is a good indicator of Grasshopper, but I think if it was noted in the guides it would be confusing since it is so seldom seen.
                >
                > The character is noted in Identification Guide to North American Passerines by Pyle, et al. It is also mentioned in Sparrows and Buntings, A Guide to Sparrows and Buntings of North America and the World by Byers et al, as â?oThe greenish-yellow lesser coverts are distinctive but not normally visible in the fieldâ?. Beadle and Rising never mention, or picture, the character in either of their books on the sparrows of the United States and Canada.
                >
                > Chuck Carlson
                > Ft. Peck
                >
                > From: Stevan Hawkins<mailto:shawkins4@...>
                > Sent: Monday, July 08, 2013 8:45 AM
                > To: MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com<mailto:MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com>
                > Subject: RE: [MOB-Montana] Re: ID Request (Grasshopper Sparrow?)
                >
                >
                >
                > Beth:
                >
                >
                > What is annoying is that the National Geographic, Crossley, and Sibley-national field guides does not say a word about the yellow in the bend of the wing. The Stokes-national field guide mentions the yellow in the wing's bend, but does not show it all that well. In the field that trait is not all that hard to find when a person encounters Grasshopper Sparrows. I learned about that trait from a banding manual.
                >
                >
                > Later!
                >
                > < /o>
                >
                > Steve
                >
                >
                > Stevan Hawkins
                >
                > San Antonio TX
                >

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