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Re: A few thoughts on chasing rare birds.

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  • doug
    For my own benefit. I ve felt sort of guilty and have had the same thoughts. I climb mountains and canoe all over the state. It s what I love to do. It seems
    Message 1 of 7 , May 3, 2013
      For my own benefit. I've felt sort of guilty and have had the same thoughts. I climb mountains and canoe all over the state. It's what I love to do. It seems like to enjoy nature you also end up hurting it. I do intend to ride my bike during the summer. I live in great falls. There's plenty to enjoy in the area. Maybe not as much as other places though. It is unfortunate that the best natural places require unnatural means of access.
      --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com, "Vincent" <gavimmer@...> wrote:
      >
      > Dear MOB -
      >
      > As an avid birder and career field biologist, I have on more than one occasion traveled many miles to add birds to my life list. The joy of taking witness to a rare visitor is an experience a birder never forgets. This email is not to criticize this practice but rather respectfully bring about the possible reasons "why" we do it and how this practice adds to our individual carbon footprint. I encourage responses to this post and welcome opposing views.
      >
      > Many birders feel "left out" as they read reports of rare birds posted on listservs. More then a few birders are all packed and ready to go chase a rarity the minute the sighting is reported. Recording the presence of a rare bird through photographs, keeping track of it's location, and documenting it's behavior is valuable to conservation. Furthermore, it is a benefit to conservation if all this information is recorded by individuals who do not travel hundreds of miles to reach the destination of the rare bird.
      >
      > Many birds are killed every year by directly colliding with automobiles. Bird populations around the globe are widely believed to be decreasing as a direct result of increased carbon emissions.
      > At the very least, please carpool to the location of the rare bird. At the very most, enjoy the postings and pictures on MOB at home and wait for the next rare bird to come to your area.
      >
      > I will end this post with these questions:
      >
      > Are we chasing rare birds for our own benefit or for the overall conservation of that species?
      >
      > Are we chasing rare birds for personal recognition or to raise awareness for bird conservation?
      >
      > Is the act of chasing rare birds a green practice?
      >
      > I challenge everyone (including myself) to consider the overall environmental impacts of "chasing" rare birds.
      >
      > Let's all spend more time riding our bikes to local birding hotspots and finding rarities in our own backyards!
      >
      >
      > Respectfully,
      > Vince Slabe
      > Bozeman
      >
    • mtn_equus
      My own particular guilt lies in disturbing the poor bird as it tries to make a living. Every calorie counts and every time any bird has to run away from nosey
      Message 2 of 7 , May 3, 2013
        My own particular guilt lies in disturbing the poor bird as it tries to make a living. Every calorie counts and every time any bird has to run away from nosey humans is one more impact on the bird's survival.
        ~k
        living vicariously thru listserves and internet photos in belgrade

        --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com, "Vincent" <gavimmer@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dear MOB -
        >
        > As an avid birder and career field biologist, I have on more than one occasion traveled many miles to add birds to my life list. The joy of taking witness to a rare visitor is an experience a birder never forgets. This email is not to criticize this practice but rather respectfully bring about the possible reasons "why" we do it and how this practice adds to our individual carbon footprint. I encourage responses to this post and welcome opposing views.
        >
        > Many birders feel "left out" as they read reports of rare birds posted on listservs. More then a few birders are all packed and ready to go chase a rarity the minute the sighting is reported. Recording the presence of a rare bird through photographs, keeping track of it's location, and documenting it's behavior is valuable to conservation. Furthermore, it is a benefit to conservation if all this information is recorded by individuals who do not travel hundreds of miles to reach the destination of the rare bird.
        >
        > Many birds are killed every year by directly colliding with automobiles. Bird populations around the globe are widely believed to be decreasing as a direct result of increased carbon emissions.
        > At the very least, please carpool to the location of the rare bird. At the very most, enjoy the postings and pictures on MOB at home and wait for the next rare bird to come to your area.
        >
        > I will end this post with these questions:
        >
        > Are we chasing rare birds for our own benefit or for the overall conservation of that species?
        >
        > Are we chasing rare birds for personal recognition or to raise awareness for bird conservation?
        >
        > Is the act of chasing rare birds a green practice?
        >
        > I challenge everyone (including myself) to consider the overall environmental impacts of "chasing" rare birds.
        >
        > Let's all spend more time riding our bikes to local birding hotspots and finding rarities in our own backyards!
        >
        >
        > Respectfully,
        > Vince Slabe
        > Bozeman
        >
      • mtn_equus
        My own particular guilt lies in disturbing the poor bird as it tries to make a living. Every calorie counts and every time any bird has to run away from nosey
        Message 3 of 7 , May 3, 2013
          My own particular guilt lies in disturbing the poor bird as it tries to make a living. Every calorie counts and every time any bird has to run away from nosey humans is one more impact on the bird's survival.
          ~k
          living vicariously thru listserves and internet photos in belgrade

          --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com, "Vincent" <gavimmer@...> wrote:
          >
          > Dear MOB -
          >
          > As an avid birder and career field biologist, I have on more than one occasion traveled many miles to add birds to my life list. The joy of taking witness to a rare visitor is an experience a birder never forgets. This email is not to criticize this practice but rather respectfully bring about the possible reasons "why" we do it and how this practice adds to our individual carbon footprint. I encourage responses to this post and welcome opposing views.
          >
          > Many birders feel "left out" as they read reports of rare birds posted on listservs. More then a few birders are all packed and ready to go chase a rarity the minute the sighting is reported. Recording the presence of a rare bird through photographs, keeping track of it's location, and documenting it's behavior is valuable to conservation. Furthermore, it is a benefit to conservation if all this information is recorded by individuals who do not travel hundreds of miles to reach the destination of the rare bird.
          >
          > Many birds are killed every year by directly colliding with automobiles. Bird populations around the globe are widely believed to be decreasing as a direct result of increased carbon emissions.
          > At the very least, please carpool to the location of the rare bird. At the very most, enjoy the postings and pictures on MOB at home and wait for the next rare bird to come to your area.
          >
          > I will end this post with these questions:
          >
          > Are we chasing rare birds for our own benefit or for the overall conservation of that species?
          >
          > Are we chasing rare birds for personal recognition or to raise awareness for bird conservation?
          >
          > Is the act of chasing rare birds a green practice?
          >
          > I challenge everyone (including myself) to consider the overall environmental impacts of "chasing" rare birds.
          >
          > Let's all spend more time riding our bikes to local birding hotspots and finding rarities in our own backyards!
          >
          >
          > Respectfully,
          > Vince Slabe
          > Bozeman
          >
        • Patricia Mclaughlin
          From previous readings and discussions on MOB, my understanding is that these articles reflect philosophy and opinions vs. sitings. Am I wrong? Dan and Jeff,
          Message 4 of 7 , May 3, 2013
            From previous readings and discussions on MOB, my understanding is that these articles reflect philosophy and opinions vs. sitings. Am I wrong? Dan and Jeff, it seems that you frowned on this type of posting in the past and recommended other discussion sites. Curious.
            Thanks,
            Pat McLaughlin
            Happy Valley
            Whitefish, MT

            On 5/3/2013 9:32 AM, mtn_equus wrote:
             

            My own particular guilt lies in disturbing the poor bird as it tries to make a living. Every calorie counts and every time any bird has to run away from nosey humans is one more impact on the bird's survival.
            ~k
            living vicariously thru listserves and internet photos in belgrade

            --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com, "Vincent" <gavimmer@...> wrote:
            >
            > Dear MOB -
            >
            > As an avid birder and career field biologist, I have on more than one occasion traveled many miles to add birds to my life list. The joy of taking witness to a rare visitor is an experience a birder never forgets. This email is not to criticize this practice but rather respectfully bring about the possible reasons "why" we do it and how this practice adds to our individual carbon footprint. I encourage responses to this post and welcome opposing views.
            >
            > Many birders feel "left out" as they read reports of rare birds posted on listservs. More then a few birders are all packed and ready to go chase a rarity the minute the sighting is reported. Recording the presence of a rare bird through photographs, keeping track of it's location, and documenting it's behavior is valuable to conservation. Furthermore, it is a benefit to conservation if all this information is recorded by individuals who do not travel hundreds of miles to reach the destination of the rare bird.
            >
            > Many birds are killed every year by directly colliding with automobiles. Bird populations around the globe are widely believed to be decreasing as a direct result of increased carbon emissions.
            > At the very least, please carpool to the location of the rare bird. At the very most, enjoy the postings and pictures on MOB at home and wait for the next rare bird to come to your area.
            >
            > I will end this post with these questions:
            >
            > Are we chasing rare birds for our own benefit or for the overall conservation of that species?
            >
            > Are we chasing rare birds for personal recognition or to raise awareness for bird conservation?
            >
            > Is the act of chasing rare birds a green practice?
            >
            > I challenge everyone (including myself) to consider the overall environmental impacts of "chasing" rare birds.
            >
            > Let's all spend more time riding our bikes to local birding hotspots and finding rarities in our own backyards!
            >
            >
            > Respectfully,
            > Vince Slabe
            > Bozeman
            >


          • Jeff Marks
            Pat, I don t mind this type of discussion, especially if it s fairly brief. I don t see much value in sustained back-and-forth discussions, because it s a
            Message 5 of 7 , May 3, 2013
              Pat,
               
              I don't mind this type of discussion, especially if it's fairly brief.  I don't see much value in sustained back-and-forth discussions, because it's a straightforward point and as you say philosophical versus black and white.  So far it's been just fine, in my opinion.  I think about this issue a lot myself.  Thanks for asking.
               
              Jeff
               
              *******************
              Jeff Marks
              4241 SE Liebe Street
              Portland, OR 97206
              503-774-4783
              Birds of Montana Project
              http://mtaudubon.org/
              *******************
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Friday, May 03, 2013 6:07 PM
              Subject: Re: [MOB-Montana] Re: A few thoughts on chasing rare birds.

               

              From previous readings and discussions on MOB, my understanding is that these articles reflect philosophy and opinions vs. sitings. Am I wrong? Dan and Jeff, it seems that you frowned on this type of posting in the past and recommended other discussion sites. Curious.
              Thanks,
              Pat McLaughlin
              Happy Valley
              Whitefish, MT

              On 5/3/2013 9:32 AM, mtn_equus wrote:
               

              My own particular guilt lies in disturbing the poor bird as it tries to make a living. Every calorie counts and every time any bird has to run away from nosey humans is one more impact on the bird's survival.
              ~k
              living vicariously thru listserves and internet photos in belgrade

              --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com, "Vincent" <gavimmer@...> wrote:
              >
              > Dear MOB -
              >
              > As an avid birder and career field biologist, I have on more than one occasion traveled many miles to add birds to my life list. The joy of taking witness to a rare visitor is an experience a birder never forgets. This email is not to criticize this practice but rather respectfully bring about the possible reasons "why" we do it and how this practice adds to our individual carbon footprint. I encourage responses to this post and welcome opposing views.
              >
              > Many birders feel "left out" as they read reports of rare birds posted on listservs. More then a few birders are all packed and ready to go chase a rarity the minute the sighting is reported. Recording the presence of a rare bird through photographs, keeping track of it's location, and documenting it's behavior is valuable to conservation. Furthermore, it is a benefit to conservation if all this information is recorded by individuals who do not travel hundreds of miles to reach the destination of the rare bird.
              >
              > Many birds are killed every year by directly colliding with automobiles. Bird populations around the globe are widely believed to be decreasing as a direct result of increased carbon emissions.
              > At the very least, please carpool to the location of the rare bird. At the very most, enjoy the postings and pictures on MOB at home and wait for the next rare bird to come to your area.
              >
              > I will end this post with these questions:
              >
              > Are we chasing rare birds for our own benefit or for the overall conservation of that species?
              >
              > Are we chasing rare birds for personal recognition or to raise awareness for bird conservation?
              >
              > Is the act of chasing rare birds a green practice?
              >
              > I challenge everyone (including myself) to consider the overall environmental impacts of "chasing" rare birds.
              >
              > Let's all spend more time riding our bikes to local birding hotspots and finding rarities in our own backyards!
              >
              >
              > Respectfully,
              > Vince Slabe
              > Bozeman
              >


            • Dan Casey
              Pat: The topic here is Montana birds and birding, and certainly relevant at a time when one can see a Harris s Hawk and a Baikal Teal in the same day in
              Message 6 of 7 , May 4, 2013
                Pat:

                The topic here is Montana birds and birding, and certainly relevant at a time when one can see a Harris's Hawk and a Baikal Teal in the same day in Montana. If the tone gets personal or stays too far, that's another matter.

                We do, however, ask that people use their name in their posts, rather than an initial or an alias.

                Dan Casey
                Somers
                --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com, Patricia Mclaughlin <2birders@...> wrote:
                >
                > From previous readings and discussions on MOB, my understanding is that
                > these articles reflect philosophy and opinions vs. sitings. Am I wrong?
                > Dan and Jeff, it seems that you frowned on this type of posting in the
                > past and recommended other discussion sites. Curious.
                > Thanks,
                > Pat McLaughlin
                > Happy Valley
                > Whitefish, MT
                >
                > On 5/3/2013 9:32 AM, mtn_equus wrote:
                > >
                > > My own particular guilt lies in disturbing the poor bird as it tries
                > > to make a living. Every calorie counts and every time any bird has to
                > > run away from nosey humans is one more impact on the bird's survival.
                > > ~k
                > > living vicariously thru listserves and internet photos in belgrade
                > >
                > > --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com
                > > , "Vincent" gavimmer@ wrote:
                > > >
                > > > Dear MOB -
                > > >
                > > > As an avid birder and career field biologist, I have on more than
                > > one occasion traveled many miles to add birds to my life list. The joy
                > > of taking witness to a rare visitor is an experience a birder never
                > > forgets. This email is not to criticize this practice but rather
                > > respectfully bring about the possible reasons "why" we do it and how
                > > this practice adds to our individual carbon footprint. I encourage
                > > responses to this post and welcome opposing views.
                > > >
                > > > Many birders feel "left out" as they read reports of rare birds
                > > posted on listservs. More then a few birders are all packed and ready
                > > to go chase a rarity the minute the sighting is reported. Recording
                > > the presence of a rare bird through photographs, keeping track of it's
                > > location, and documenting it's behavior is valuable to conservation.
                > > Furthermore, it is a benefit to conservation if all this information
                > > is recorded by individuals who do not travel hundreds of miles to
                > > reach the destination of the rare bird.
                > > >
                > > > Many birds are killed every year by directly colliding with
                > > automobiles. Bird populations around the globe are widely believed to
                > > be decreasing as a direct result of increased carbon emissions.
                > > > At the very least, please carpool to the location of the rare bird.
                > > At the very most, enjoy the postings and pictures on MOB at home and
                > > wait for the next rare bird to come to your area.
                > > >
                > > > I will end this post with these questions:
                > > >
                > > > Are we chasing rare birds for our own benefit or for the overall
                > > conservation of that species?
                > > >
                > > > Are we chasing rare birds for personal recognition or to raise
                > > awareness for bird conservation?
                > > >
                > > > Is the act of chasing rare birds a green practice?
                > > >
                > > > I challenge everyone (including myself) to consider the overall
                > > environmental impacts of "chasing" rare birds.
                > > >
                > > > Let's all spend more time riding our bikes to local birding hotspots
                > > and finding rarities in our own backyards!
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Respectfully,
                > > > Vince Slabe
                > > > Bozeman
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                >
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