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Osprey Watch: join a global community of observers

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  • Wilson, Michael D
    Become an Osprey Watcher: Connect with a global community of observers The Center for Conservation Biology has launched Osprey-Watch, a project created to
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 4, 2012
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      Become an Osprey Watcher: Connect with a global community of observers

      The Center for Conservation Biology has launched Osprey-Watch, a project created to engage a global community to collect data on breeding osprey. Linked by an interest in osprey and a concern for the health of the aquatic environments on which they rely, this community will for the first time provide a global perspective on this charismatic species. The mission of Osprey-Watch is to bring citizen scientists together in order to collect information on a large enough spatial scale to be useful in addressing three of the most pressing issues facing aquatic ecosystems including global climate change, depletion of fish stocks, and environmental contaminants.

      Osprey are one of very few truly global sentinels for aquatic health. They feed almost exclusively on live fish throughout their entire life cycle. They are a top consumer within aquatic ecosystems and are very sensitive to both overfishing and environmental contaminants. Nearly all populations breed in the northern latitudes and winter in the southern latitudes, effectively linking the aquatic health of the hemispheres. Their breeding season in the north is highly seasonal making them an effective barometer of climate change.

      Osprey-Watch is a user-friendly, internet platform that allows observers across the globe to map their nests, log observations, upload photos, and interact within an observer forum. Information entered into the platform will be immediately accessible to users and will be summarized following the breeding season.

      To join a growing community of global citizens, please visit http://www.osprey-watch.org and become an Osprey-Watcher.


      Michael Wilson
      Center for Conservation Biology
      College of William and Mary & Virginia Commonwealth University
      P.O. Box 8795
      Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795
      phone: 757-221-1649
      fax: 757-221-1650
      email: mdwils@...
      http://www.osprey-watch.org
    • A Montana View
      Hi Michael. I just the Osprey-Watch site. I live in the Bitterroot and we are a fly fishing outfitting company on the Clark Fork, Blackfoot, Big Hole and
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 4, 2012
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        Hi Michael. I just the Osprey-Watch site. I live in the Bitterroot and we are a fly fishing outfitting company on the Clark Fork, Blackfoot, Big Hole and Bitterroot Rivers. My partner Jack the outfitter/guide is actually on the water more than I am, but I get out, too. We LOVE osprey. We both take photos of the osprey as often as we can and have our favorite nests we watch. I did not know about the Osprey-Watch project. I just joined the site and will get more familiar with it. Thank you for sending this. Not sure if you heard but Milltown Dam near Missoula, MT on the Clark Fork River was recently removed. For 100 years it had trapped toxic sediments from the Butte area mines. Terrible stuff. It was a huge superfund site. We are very interested in how the river, the waterfowl, and other birds (definitely osprey) will benefit from that dam removal and cleanup. I look forward to participating in this important and fascinating project. Thanks for the opportunity through your email.

        Visit http://www.clarkfork.org/.

         

        Merle Ann Loman

        Victor, Montana

         

        From: MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com [mailto:MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Wilson, Michael D
        Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2012 12:35 PM
        To: 'MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com'
        Subject: [MOB-Montana] Osprey Watch: join a global community of observers

         

         

        Become an Osprey Watcher: Connect with a global community of observers

        The Center for Conservation Biology has launched Osprey-Watch, a project created to engage a global community to collect data on breeding osprey. Linked by an interest in osprey and a concern for the health of the aquatic environments on which they rely, this community will for the first time provide a global perspective on this charismatic species. The mission of Osprey-Watch is to bring citizen scientists together in order to collect information on a large enough spatial scale to be useful in addressing three of the most pressing issues facing aquatic ecosystems including global climate change, depletion of fish stocks, and environmental contaminants.

        Osprey are one of very few truly global sentinels for aquatic health. They feed almost exclusively on live fish throughout their entire life cycle. They are a top consumer within aquatic ecosystems and are very sensitive to both overfishing and environmental contaminants. Nearly all populations breed in the northern latitudes and winter in the southern latitudes, effectively linking the aquatic health of the hemispheres. Their breeding season in the north is highly seasonal making them an effective barometer of climate change.

        Osprey-Watch is a user-friendly, internet platform that allows observers across the globe to map their nests, log observations, upload photos, and interact within an observer forum. Information entered into the platform will be immediately accessible to users and will be summarized following the breeding season.

        To join a growing community of global citizens, please visit http://www.osprey-watch.org and become an Osprey-Watcher.

        Michael Wilson
        Center for Conservation Biology
        College of William and Mary & Virginia Commonwealth University
        P.O. Box 8795
        Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795
        phone: 757-221-1649
        fax: 757-221-1650
        email: mdwils@...
        http://www.osprey-watch.org

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