Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: The next "Mega"-rarity

Expand Messages
  • Mike Lesnik
    Maybe wishfull thinking, but I think that a lot of southern Montana is Sage Sparrow habitat. Mike ... that ... than
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 11, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Maybe wishfull thinking, but I think that a lot of southern Montana is
      Sage Sparrow habitat. Mike

      --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com, "radley521" <ricenoggle@...> wrote:
      >
      > As we discuss the current ebb and flow of birds through Montana, I
      > wonder what the next "mega"-rarity will be. By "mega"-rarity, I mean
      > species that have been seen less than 5 times of never within the
      > state. I have my own guess, but I would really like to know what the
      > entire community thinks the next "mega"-rarity sighting will be.
      >
      > My guess is Eastern Wood-pewee. I believe this because I actually
      that
      > this species a much more frequent migrant through the Westby area
      than
      > the data reflects.
      >
      > So what is your guess and why?
      >
    • JEFFREY MARKS
      Radd and Mike, Dan Casey went through a similar exercise a few years back: he polled Montana birders as to which species we thought would be the next new
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 11, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Radd and Mike,
         
        Dan Casey went through a similar exercise a few years back: he polled Montana birders as to which species we thought would be the next new species for the state.  
         
        The first two guesses for the next "mega-rarity" perhaps should be disqualified because they've been seen more than 5 times.  Sage Sparrows have been recorded dozens of times, having recently been found to be regular (albeit local) breeders in Beaverhead Co.  And Eastern Wood-Pewee has been recorded at least 8 times, though Montana Bird Distribution contains about half that number of accepted records (see Wright, Northwestern Naturalist 77:57-85).  It is a "cryptic" rarity because it can be identified reliably only if it is vocalizing.  Given that it breeds close to the northeastern corner of the state, it probably occurs here (in Montana, not Portland) every year but goes undetected.
         
        Jeff
         
        *****************
        Jeff Marks
        5316 SE Henry Street
        Portland, OR 97206
        503-774-4783
        406-396-3331 (cell)
        *****************
      • radley521
        Jeff, Great point on the Eastern Wood-pewee being a cryptic species...maybe Ted Nordhagen, Harriett, the Carlsons, or any other northeastern montana birders
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 12, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Jeff,

          Great point on the Eastern Wood-pewee being a cryptic species...maybe
          Ted Nordhagen, Harriett, the Carlsons, or any other northeastern
          montana birders have some insight into the possibility?

          Radd



          --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com, "JEFFREY MARKS"
          <jeff17_marks@...> wrote:
          >
          > Radd and Mike,
          >
          > Dan Casey went through a similar exercise a few years back: he
          polled Montana birders as to which species we thought would be the
          next new species for the state.
          >
          > The first two guesses for the next "mega-rarity" perhaps should be
          disqualified because they've been seen more than 5 times. Sage
          Sparrows have been recorded dozens of times, having recently been
          found to be regular (albeit local) breeders in Beaverhead Co. And
          Eastern Wood-Pewee has been recorded at least 8 times, though Montana
          Bird Distribution contains about half that number of accepted records
          (see Wright, Northwestern Naturalist 77:57-85). It is a "cryptic"
          rarity because it can be identified reliably only if it is
          vocalizing. Given that it breeds close to the northeastern corner of
          the state, it probably occurs here (in Montana, not Portland) every
          year but goes undetected.
          >
          > Jeff
          >
          > *****************
          > Jeff Marks
          > 5316 SE Henry Street
          > Portland, OR 97206
          > 503-774-4783
          > 406-396-3331 (cell)
          > *****************
          >
        • Radd Icenoggle
          Jeff, Do you have a guess? Radd ... polled Montana birders as to which species we thought would be the next new species for the state. ... disqualified because
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 12, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Jeff,

            Do you have a guess?

            Radd

            --- In MOB-Montana@yahoogroups.com, "JEFFREY MARKS"
            <jeff17_marks@...> wrote:
            >
            > Radd and Mike,
            >
            > Dan Casey went through a similar exercise a few years back: he
            polled Montana birders as to which species we thought would be the
            next new species for the state.
            >
            > The first two guesses for the next "mega-rarity" perhaps should be
            disqualified because they've been seen more than 5 times. Sage
            Sparrows have been recorded dozens of times, having recently been
            found to be regular (albeit local) breeders in Beaverhead Co. And
            Eastern Wood-Pewee has been recorded at least 8 times, though Montana
            Bird Distribution contains about half that number of accepted records
            (see Wright, Northwestern Naturalist 77:57-85). It is a "cryptic"
            rarity because it can be identified reliably only if it is
            vocalizing. Given that it breeds close to the northeastern corner of
            the state, it probably occurs here (in Montana, not Portland) every
            year but goes undetected.
            >
            > Jeff
            >
            > *****************
            > Jeff Marks
            > 5316 SE Henry Street
            > Portland, OR 97206
            > 503-774-4783
            > 406-396-3331 (cell)
            > *****************
            >
          • JEFFREY MARKS
            Great-tailed Grackle, which officially has been recorded only once before (pair at Bowdoin in mid-1990s). JM ***************** Jeff Marks 5316 SE Henry Street
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 12, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Great-tailed Grackle, which officially has been recorded only once before (pair at Bowdoin in mid-1990s).
               
              JM
               
              *****************
              Jeff Marks
              5316 SE Henry Street
              Portland, OR 97206
              503-774-4783
              406-396-3331 (cell)
              *****************
            • Dan Casey
              Radd et al: I polled birders for two sets of ranked predictions...their top ten choices for the next new species for the state, and which of the species on the
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 12, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Radd et al:

                I polled birders for two sets of ranked predictions...their top ten
                choices for the next new species for the state, and which of the
                species on the supplemental list at the time would be seen again.
                Both within your "mega" category. Unfortunately, I am writing this
                from the road and do not have the final tally on my laptop. But the
                top few species included Lesser-black Backed Gull (a sighting to be
                reviewed now); Slaty-backed Gull, Tufted Duck and Curve-billed
                Thrasher (first record this year). Other accurate predictions were
                Eastern Towhee, White-tailed Kite, and Ross's Gull (pretty far down
                the list); but the first new state bird after I put together the list
                was Siberian Accentor, not mentioned by one participant. And as you
                might imagine, no one predicted Manx Shearwater either. Proof that
                birds have wings.

                I will post that list when I'm home again next week. It also included
                several species of hummingbird (e.g. Magnificent), Eastern Meadowlark,
                Northern Wheatear, and many others.

                Dan Casey
                Somers
                >
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.