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Trs: Apr 29: Virus to Improve Solar-Cell Efficiency, Mystery of Raman Signal Enhancement, Limit to Nanotechnology Mass-Production?

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    =============================================== Masyarakat Nano IndonesiaKawasan PUSPIPTEK Serpong Gd. 410, Balai Inkubator Teknologi BPPT R.129Tangerang
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      Masyarakat Nano Indonesia
      Kawasan PUSPIPTEK Serpong Gd. 410, Balai Inkubator Teknologi BPPT R.129
      Tangerang Banten 15310, INDONESIA
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      --- Pada Jum, 29/4/11, NILT Nano News <newsletter@...> menulis:

      Dari: NILT Nano News <newsletter@...>
      Judul: Apr 29: Virus to Improve Solar-Cell Efficiency, Mystery of Raman Signal Enhancement, Limit to Nanotechnology Mass-Production?
      Kepada: nano_indonesia@...
      Tanggal: Jumat, 29 April, 2011, 12:37 AM

       
      Week 17
      April 2011

      NILT Nano Newsletter

       
      Dear Colleagues, Unsubscribe - Receiving email nano_indonesia@...
      Researchers at MIT have found a way to make significant improvements to the power-conversion efficiency of solar cells by enlisting the services of tiny viruses to perform detailed assembly work of carbon nanotubes. The virus, a genetically engineered version of a virus called M13, is used to control the arrangement of the nanotubes on a surface keeping the tubes separated so they do not short out the circuits and keeping the tubes apart so they do not clump together. In addition, the virus was engineered to produce a coating of titanium dioxide, a key ingredient for dye-sensitized solar cells where the new technique was tested, over each of the nanotubes, putting the titanium dioxide in close proximity to the wire-like nanotubes that carry the electrons. In the tests, adding the virus-built structures enhanced the power conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells to 10.6% from 8%, almost a one-third improvement. Others have attempted to use carbon nanotubes to improve solar cell efficiency but the improvements observed in earlier studies were marginal compared to what the MIT researchers have achieved. The results have been published online this week in Nature Nanotechnology. Read this and the 7 other very interesting news below.
      Editor, CTO, NIL Technology
      Brian Bilenberg
        

      MIT Researchers use Virus to Improve Solar-Cell Efficiency
      Researchers at MIT have found a way to make significant improvements to the power-conversion efficiency of solar cells by enlisting the services of tiny viruses to perform detailed assembly work at the microscopic level.
      [Esciencenews.com]  

      Scientists Shed Light on Mystery of Raman Signal Enhancement
      The mystery behind a detection method that can sense the presence of individual molecules—useful for researchers analyzing artwork and anthrax alike—has been unraveled by scientists with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).
      [Rdmag.com]  

      Limit to Nanotechnology Mass-Production?
      A leading nanotechnology scientist has raised questions over a billion dollar industry by boldly claiming that there is a limit to how small nanotechnology materials can be mass produced
      [Nanotechwire.com]  



      Conducting Ferroelectrics may be Key to New Electronic Memory
      Novel properties of ferroelectric materials discovered at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are moving scientists one step closer to realizing a new paradigm of electronic memory storage.
      [Physorg.com]  

      Sapphire Patterning Boosts Green Light Generation and Extraction
      Researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in the USA and SCIVAX Corp of Japan have used patterned sapphire substrates to improve efficiency of green (520–570nm wavelength) light-emitting diode (LED) indium gallium nitride (InGaN) semiconductor structures.
      [Semiconductor-Today.com]  

      Optical Microscope without Lenses Produces High-Resolution 3-D Images on a Chip
      UCLA researchers have redefined the concept of a microscope by removing the lens to create a system that is small enough to fit in the palm of a hand but powerful enough to create three-dimensional tomographic images of miniscule samples.
      [Eurekalert.org]  



      Full 3-D Invisibility Cloak in Visible Light
      Watching things disappear "is an amazing experience," admits Joachim Fischer of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany. But making items vanish is not the reason he creates invisibility cloaks. Rather, the magic-like tricks are attractive demonstrations of the fantastic capabilities that new optical theories and nanotechnology construction methods now enable.
      [ScienceDaily.com]  

      Is DNA a Conducting Nanowire?
      Researchers have demonstrated how a 34 nm long monolayer of double-stranded DNA on a gold surface, comprising just 100 base pairs, can carry a low current. The discovery is another small step towards the ultimate goal of nanoelectronics but also holds promise for exquisite DNA sensors.
      [Materialstoday.com]  




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