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Trs: Oct 02: Nanosensing Transistors Powered by Stress, Artificial Pore Created, Microchip that could Restore Vision

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    Masyarakat Nano IndonesiaKawasan PUSPIPTEK Serpong Gd. 410Balai Inkubator Teknologi BPPT R.129Tangerang Banten 15310INDONESIATelp/Fax    : (021) 7587 0479
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 2, 2009


      Masyarakat Nano Indonesia
      Kawasan PUSPIPTEK Serpong Gd. 410
      Balai Inkubator Teknologi BPPT R.129
      Tangerang Banten 15310
      INDONESIA
      Telp/Fax    : (021) 7587 0479
      website      : www.nano.or.id
      email         : nano_indonesia@...



      --- Pada Jum, 2/10/09, nanonews@... <nanonews@...> menulis:

      Dari: nanonews@... <nanonews@...>
      Judul: Oct 02: Nanosensing Transistors Powered by Stress, Artificial Pore Created, Microchip that could Restore Vision
      Kepada: nano_indonesia@...
      Tanggal: Jumat, 2 Oktober, 2009, 3:14 AM

       
      Week 40
      October 2009

      NILT Nano Newsletter

       
      Dear Colleagues, Unsubscribe - Receiving email nano_indonesia@...
      Nanoscale sensors have many potential applications, from detecting disease molecules in blood to sensing sound within an artificial ear. But nanosensors typically have to be integrated with bulky power sources and integrated circuits. Now researchers, led by Professor of materials science Zhong Lin Wang, at Georgia Tech have demonstrated a nanoscale sensor that does not need these other parts. The new sensors consist of a vertical zinc oxide wire, 25 nanometers in diameter, forming a field-effect transistor. The nanowire is partially embedded in a substrate and connected at the root to gold electrodes that act as the source and the drain. When the wire is bent, the mechanical stress concentrates at the root, and charges build up. This creates an electrical potential that acts as a gate voltage, allowing electrical current to flow from source to drain, turning the device on. Wang's group has successfully tested various triggers, including using a nanoscale probe to nudge the wire, and blowing gas over it. Using different lengths of nanowires in an array, each of them responsive to different frequencies of sound, the new device could potentially lead to battery free hearing aids. Read this and the 7 other very interested news below.
      Editor, CTO, NIL Technology
      Brian Bilenberg
        

      Nanosensing Transistors Powered by Stress
      Nanoscale sensors have many potential applications, from detecting disease molecules in blood to sensing sound within an artificial ear. But nanosensors typically have to be integrated with bulky power sources and integrated circuits. Now researchers at Georgia Tech have demonstrated a nanoscale sensor that doesn't need these other parts.
      [Technologyreview.com]  

      Nanotechnology: Artificial Pore Created
      Using an RNA-powered nanomotor, University of Cincinnati (UC) biomedical engineering researchers have successfully developed an artificial pore able to transmit nanoscale material through a membrane.
      [Sciencedaily.com]   

      MIT Creating Microchip that could Restore Vision
      Researchers use wireless tech, chip and a camera to fight macular degeneration.
      [Computerworld.com]   



      Cheap, Sensitive Sensors could Detect Explosives, Toxins in Water
      A sensitive new Stanford-developed disposable chip detects low concentrations of the explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT) and a close chemical cousin of the dreaded toxic nerve agent sarin in water samples. The research appears online this week in the journal ACS Nano.
      [Physorg.com]   

      New Brain Implants Developed using Nanotechnology
      Brain implants that can more clearly record signals from surrounding neurons in rats have been created at the University of Michigan. The findings could eventually lead to more effective treatment of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease and paralysis.
      [Nanotech-now.com]   

      Time Lens Speeds Optical Data
      Researchers at Cornell University have developed a simple silicon device for speeding up optical data.
      [Technologyreview.com]   


      Harnessing Nanopatterns: Tiny Textures can Produce Big Differences
      Research at MIT has uncovered new information about how nanoscale patterns on the surface of a material can produce significant changes in the way it interacts with liquids. The discovery could be significant in understanding interactions that affect a wide variety of biological processes in living cells.
      [MIT.edu]   

      Silicon-Germanium Microelectronics Reduces Spacecraft Weight
      Space environments can deliver a beating to spacecraft electronics. For decades, satellites and other spacecraft have used bulky and expensive shielding to protect vital microelectronics-microprocessors and other integrated circuits-from space radiation.
      [Azonano.com] 



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