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Wray- Divorce over Mulatto Children

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  • Lynn
    These historical records are so interesting--thought I would post it here. While the husband and wife are fighting over their issues (and indescretitions), the
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 10 6:07 PM
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      These historical records are so interesting--thought I would post it
      here. While the husband and wife are fighting over their issues (and
      indescretitions), the African-American slaves are completely ignored.
      I don't know what you call this--the slaves are considered less than
      property. Reading this shows that slaves were not considered human,
      not as valuable or important as a piece of china or a piece of
      land...and the only worth they had (if any) was by how the slave
      holder defined them. If there is any justice, it is in telling the
      story of the slaves & being aware that our lives are built upon their
      struggles and efforts.

      Best, Lynn


      http://www.lexisnexus.com/academic/guides/Aaas/slavpet0201.pdf

      p.256 of 531

      0873, Accession #20184915

      Montgomery County, AL

      In his answer and cross bill, Albert G. Wray denies that he treated
      his wife Susan "with a spirit of unkindness harshness cruelty and
      neglect"; he denies that he has had any illicit sexual relations with
      any of his slaves; and he denies that he encouraged C.G.M. Prince to
      seduce his wife so that he (Wray) could file a divorce petition. Wray
      explains that his wife not only had an affair with Prince but also
      probably with several slaves. "There is one of the children of the
      said Mary about two years old who is the reputed child of a bright
      mulattoe slave called John", Wray explains; whether her other
      children are mulattoes is difficult to know, but he sure about one
      thing; none of them are his, despite their fourteen years of marriage.
    • Jaime Pretell
      Less than human yes. I doubt they were considered less than property as they were property. And expensive property. ... Sent: Saturday, March 11, 2006 1:29 PM
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 12 8:36 AM
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        Less than human yes. I doubt they were considered less than
        property as they were property. And expensive property.

        ----- Original Message -----

        Sent: Saturday, March 11, 2006 1:29 PM
        Subject: Wray- Divorce over Mulatto Children
        From: "Lynn" <graceofwynn@...>

        These historical records are so interesting--thought I would post it here.
        While the husband and wife are fighting over their issues (and
        indescretitions), the African-American slaves are completely ignored.
        I don't know what you call this--the slaves are considered less than property.
        Reading this shows that slaves were not considered human, not as
        valuable or important as a piece of china or a piece of land...
        and the only worth they had (if any) was by how the slave holder defined them.
        If there is any justice, it is in telling the story of the slaves &
        being aware that our lives are built upon their struggles and efforts.

        Best, Lynn

        http://www.lexisnexus.com/academic/guides/Aaas/slavpet0201.pdf
        p.256 of 531 0873, Accession #20184915 Montgomery County, AL

        In his answer and cross bill, Albert G. Wray denies that
        he treated his wife Susan "with a spirit of unkindness
        harshness cruelty and neglect"; he denies that he has
        had any illicit sexual relations with any of his slaves;

        and he denies that he encouraged C.G.M. Prince to seduce
        his wife so that he (Wray) could file a divorce petition.

        Wray explains that his wife not only had an affair
        with Prince but also probably with several slaves.

        "There is one of the children of the said Mary
        about two years old who is the reputed child of a
        bright mulattoe slave called John", Wray explains;
        whether her other children are mulattoes is difficult to know,
        but he sure about one thing; none of them are his,
        despite their fourteen years of marriage.
        ______________________________________________________________________
      • Lynn Mari
        I talked to a representative of the mining union in Alabama to help get some information for my family history... One of the things he told me was that in the
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 15 2:15 PM
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          I talked to a representative of the mining union in Alabama to help get some information for my family history...
           
          One of the things he told me was that in the 1930's and 1940's the mines would enlist labor from African-Americans. There was an exodus of people who worked on the farms and in rural areas to the cities, where they worked the mines. The conditions in the mind were so bad--and the way you were paid was just as bad, if not worse, than share cropping. The representative was telling me that mules were more valuable to mining companies than African-American mine workers. The mules cost money to the company--and were seen as just being a higher status. If an African-American was killed or injured, it didn't matter. They would just get someone else.
           
          I think the same kind of attitude applies to the Wray divorce.
           
          Thanks for your thoughts!
           
          Best, Lynn


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        • wergifts2
          Wow Lynn!! This is incredibly sad to read how truly horrible certain people (in this case, the people of the African-American ethnicity) were treated as little
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 15 2:35 PM
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            Wow Lynn!!

            This is incredibly sad to read how truly horrible certain people
            (in this case, the people of the African-American ethnicity)
            were treated as little as two or three generations ago.

            It makes one grateful to not only find themeselves born in a
            different era -- but also -- for the sacrifice and struggles
            those who arrived before them made on their behalf!

            Thanks for sharing this bit of history with us all.

            You are such a great resource and wealth of knowledge!!

            Lynn Mari <graceofwynn@...> wrote:

            I talked to a representative of the mining union in Alabama
            to help get some information for my family history...

            One of the things he told me was that in the 1930's and
            1940's the mines would enlist labor from African-Americans.
            There was an exodus of people who worked on the farms and
            in rural areas to the cities, where they worked the mines.
            The conditions in the mind were so bad--and the way you were
            paid was just as bad, if not worse, than share cropping.
            The representative was telling me that mules were more valuable
            to mining companies than African-American mine workers.
            The mules cost money to the company--and were seen as just being
            a higher status. If an African-American was killed or
            injured, it didn't matter. They would just get someone else.

            I think the same kind of attitude applies to the Wray divorce.

            Thanks for your thoughts!

            Best, Lynn
          • wergifts2
            Hi Lynn, Have you ever come across the web site found at the following link before?: http://www.archives.state.al.us/adahindx.html If so, did you find it to be
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 15 2:39 PM
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              Hi Lynn,

              Have you ever come across the web site
              found at the following link before?:

              http://www.archives.state.al.us/adahindx.html

              If so, did you find it to be of help in researching
              your family's history / family tree in Alabama?

              Lynn Mari <graceofwynn@...> wrote:

              I talked to a representative of the mining union in Alabama
              to help get some information for my family history......

              Best, Lynn
            • Lynn Mari
              Hello Were2Gifts- Sorry so slow to respond...was having computer problems :( The AL Dept of History and Archives is helpful if you know what you need. They
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 30 8:42 AM
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                Hello Were2Gifts-
                 
                Sorry so slow to respond...was having computer problems :(
                 
                The AL Dept of History and Archives is helpful if you know what you need. They usually charge a fee for their services.
                I did contact them to get copies of  old prison records, and that was really amazing.
                Every county in Alabama has a genealogy web site. I would start there.
                You can also post queries, get tips and look for others with your family name at Afrigeneas.com
                 
                Also, my library has a free subscription to Ancestry.
                You can e-mail me privately at:
                When I get to the library I can do a search for you.
                 
                I hope your family search is going well!
                 
                :) Lynn

              • wergifts2
                Hi Lynn, Thanks for writing. Your information is greatly appreciated! [:)] Lynn Mari wrote: Hello Were2Gifts- Sorry so slow to respond...was
                Message 7 of 7 , Apr 3, 2006
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                  Hi Lynn,

                  Thanks for writing.
                  Your information is greatly appreciated!

                  :)

                  Lynn Mari <graceofwynn@...> wrote:

                  Hello Were2Gifts-

                  Sorry so slow to respond...was having computer problems :(

                  The AL Dept of History and Archives is helpful if you know what you need.
                  They usually charge a fee for their services.
                  I did contact them to get copies of old prison records, and that was really amazing.
                  Every county in Alabama has a genealogy web site. I would start there.
                  You can also post queries, get tips and look for others with your family name at Afrigeneas.com

                  Also, my library has a free subscription to Ancestry.
                  You can e-mail me privately at:
                  WintyreEve@...
                  When I get to the library I can do a search for you.

                  I hope your family search is going well!

                  :) Lynn

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