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As to MEG theory document in files section

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  • Dave
    Hello all, First I would like to say, I am very impressed with the site. It will take a bit to catch up with the posts. I read through the files section, and
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 20, 2005
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      Hello all,

      First I would like to say, I am very impressed with the site.
      It will take a bit to catch up with the posts.
      I read through the files section, and the photos.
      This is some very good work, I apreciate that such a good record is
      available. Congrats to the moderators.

      I would like to comment on the one file by Dave Squires on 11/8/2000.
      "MEG Theory.htm" posted by dnarby.

      This is an excellent document, however I see one problem that really
      glares out at me. The assumption that an opened copper coil will not
      effect the energy of a moving magnetic field inside it. I believe that
      this assumption is wrong because of the magnetic expierments I have
      conducted using spining copper cylinders. Any copper inside a moving
      magnetic field becomes a drag to the system and draws energy. This is
      the down side of using copper wire. Copper atoms are never at rest in a
      a moving magnetic field. They will attempt to convert the field to
      [electricity] and/or to motion [torsional energy]. Thus copper losses
      are still present in an opened circuited copper winding. Copper always
      resists a moving magnetic field, and will be physically dragged along
      with it.

      In a moving magnetic field, copper is either generating fields
      [induction] or sucking them up and changing them to heat or [torsion]
      pressure. Since this is happening at the atomic level there is really
      no way to stop it by opening the circuit. This effect has been observed
      to be far stronger then I originally expected, and needs consideration
      if OU is involved.

      The only solution to these losses I have found is to keep all copper
      windings energized and in a state that will aid the desired effect, or
      keep the magnetic field away from the copper with opposing static
      fields, or positioning during off periods.

      Has anyone done anything with other kinds of wire like, iron or mu-
      metal wire, where little resistance to moving magnetic fields is
      encountered? Or has anyone tried capacitive wound, dual wiring
      techniques with pancake type coils?

      Dave
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