Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [MEG_builders] Experiments with a new A-potential theory

Expand Messages
  • jonfli
    Hi David, Thanks for your most interesting post and especially the info on your experiment(s). For some reason though, the images did not come thru on my end
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 10 3:50 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi David,

      Thanks for your most interesting post and especially the info on your
      experiment(s). For some reason though, the images did not come thru on my
      end so I'm wondering if you could send them to me or post them on this
      site's archive? I have done many experiments with the external A-Field on
      MEG configurations but never used an external core material!

      Looking forward to hearing more from you-

      Regards,
      Jon

      ----- Original Message -----

      Experiments with a new A-potential theory.

      In searching the internet for information on the interaction of the
      magnetic
      vector potential (A) and charged particles, the following information was
      gleaned
      from a lecture summary:

      (Fig 1.)


      Essentially what is being done is to use the moving charged particle as
      the point of
      reference and observing what it would see as it moves. This derivation
      shows that as it
      moves through a magnetic vector potential, the charged particle will
      experience an electric
      field, which will either accelerate or decelerate the particle depending on
      whether the
      gradient of the magnetic vector potential is decreasing or increasing. The
      most important
      part of this derivation, other than the fact that the magnetic vector
      potential can be static
      (as from a permanent magnet), is that the effect depends entirely on the
      velocity of the
      charged particle. For a copper wire at room temperature, the "drift"
      velocity of the electrons
      (the average velocity after collisions with the molecules of the copper
      wire) within the wire
      is approximately millimeters per second, which yields a very small electric
      field when
      moving through the potential. However, if the electrons can be brought to
      the surface of the
      wire, where there will be fewer collisions, the velocity will be much
      higher, approaching the
      "Fermi" velocity (motion in the empty space between the molecules of the
      copper wire),
      which can be millions of meters per second (and can approach the speed of
      light,
      300,000,000 meters/second). When numbers are plugged into the above
      derivation for
      what might be a typical device:
      1. A neodymium permanent magnet with a magnetic field of 10,000 gauss
      2. A magnetic core completely containing the magnetic field (such as a
      nanocrystalline
      core)
      3. A main core thickness of about 25 millimeters
      4. An external core which might be 12 millimeters above the surface of
      the main core
      5. Windings around the external core to carry electrons.

      If we assume a velocity of 1,000 meters/second, moving away from the main
      core surface,
      the particle will see an effective electric field of about 100 volts/meter.
      This is not
      insignificant. Note that once the charged particle is in motion, the
      particle gains kinetic
      energy simply from moving through the gradient of the magnetic vector
      potential. Of course, when the particle is moving toward the main core
      surface it will lose kinetic energy.
      A possible device that could exploit this is:

      (Fig 2.)


      The main core has a magnetic field that is parallel to its surface. The
      direction of this
      field can be in and out of the this page, or left to right across the page,
      only the gradient
      of the magnetic-vector-potential which forms this field, which is
      perpendicular to the main
      core surface, is important.

      The external core has a primary winding, driven by voltage taken from a
      coil wound
      around the main core, and a secondary winding used to detect changes in the
      external core's magnetic field.

      Note that the electron moving away from the main core experience an
      acceleration,
      whereas the electron moving toward the core will experience a deceleration.
      Assuming
      nothing happens to tap the electron kinetic energy, one-time around the loop
      and the
      electron will end up with the same energy it had when starting. Michael
      Berry
      ( http://www.phy.bris.ac.uk/staff/berry_mv.html ) says that even though
      this is true, the
      phase of the particle as determined by its wave equation will not be the
      same. Thus
      something has changed during the motion around the external core. In
      addition, there
      will be synchrotron radiation because of the acceleration/deceleration of
      the charged
      particle, although the Larmor formula indicates that for the given
      conditions this
      radiation energy will be very small. It is my belief, and the direction of
      my current
      experiments, to determine that the faster motion of the charged particles
      changes the
      magnetic field in the external core, since to the external core this appears
      to the core
      to be a larger current. As long as this external core contains all the
      induced magnetic
      field, such as a toroid, this magnetic field will not produce a Lorentz
      force ( velocity
      times magnetic field) to deflect and interfere with the particle motion.

      A build-up has been constructed, using a Honeywell amorphous
      nanocrystalline core,
      AMCC-320, a nedymium magnet, and a "bridge" MOSFET driver to induce voltage
      into
      a coil which drives electrons into the winding on the external core. The
      coil driven by
      the MOSFETs is 10 turns, the coil driving current through the winding on the
      external
      core is 60 turns. The winding on the external core is a bifilar winding of
      24 turns, with
      a secondary winding of 24 turns. The bifilar winding is to pursuade the
      electrons in the
      winding to move near the surface of the wire, hopefully increasing their
      velocity. The
      value of the load resistor is variable, typically enough to cause a current
      flow of about
      40 mA, which is a good number of electrons in motion.

      (Fig 3.)


      Note that the winding on the external core is connected so that electron
      flow will
      be in the same direction on each of the wires of the bifilar winding to and
      through the
      load resistor.

      To date, experiments to detect this effect have been inconclusive. This is
      probably
      because the charged particles must have a significant velocity relative to
      the drift
      velocity ( and hence travelling on the surface of the wire ), which is not
      the normal
      electron path at low frequencies in a wire, and the influence of the
      voltages used in
      providing a driving voltage on the external core's secondary winding which
      masks
      what is a small effect in comparison (parasitic capacitance between the
      bifilar core
      and the oscilloscope 'sense' winding).
      It may be that only by the use of several drive windings and external-core
      windings
      will there be a clear effect observed due to a multiplying effect of each
      external
      winding on the total voltage/current flow (a ping-pong as explained by
      others).

      I purchased an inexpensive gaussmeter and Neodymium magnets from
      ForceField/WonderMagnet, http://www.wondermagnet.com
      There are plans for an inexpensive gaussmeter at:
      http://my.execpc.com/~rhoadley/magmeter.htm
      http://my.execpc.com/~rhoadley/magmetr1.htm
      Dr. Bearden has mentioned some guidelines of MEG construction in
      correspondence on his site:
      http://www.cheniere.org/correspondence/061603.htm
      and some pitfalls of MEG operation in
      http://www.cheniere.org/correspondence/052003.htm
      When you read this closely, and consider the A-interaction outlined
      above, it
      makes sense.

      David J.
    • David Jenkins
      Experiments with a new A-potential theory. In searching the internet for information on the interaction of the magnetic vector potential (A) and charged
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 10 4:18 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        Experiments with a new A-potential theory.
         
           In searching the internet for information on the interaction of the magnetic
        vector potential (A) and charged particles, the following information was gleaned
        from a lecture summary:
         
            Figure 1:   Derivation of how a static A-potential can influence a charged particle.
            Go to "Files" then go to the folder "MESSAGE ATTACHMENTS", go to the folder
        "Experiments with a new A-poten", and open "Experiments with a new A-potential
        theory Fig1.bmp".
         
           Essentially what is being done is to use the moving charged particle as the point of
        reference and observing what it would see as it moves.  This derivation shows that as it
        moves through a magnetic vector potential, the charged particle will experience an electric
        field, which will either accelerate or decelerate the particle depending on whether the
        gradient of the magnetic vector potential is decreasing or increasing.  The most important
        part of this derivation, other than the fact that the magnetic vector potential can be static
        (as from a permanent magnet), is that the effect depends entirely on the velocity of the
        charged particle.  For a copper wire at room temperature, the "drift" velocity of the electrons
        (the average velocity after collisions with the molecules of the copper wire) within the wire
        is approximately millimeters per second, which yields a very small electric field when
        moving through the potential.  However, if the electrons can be brought to the surface of the
        wire, where there will be fewer collisions, the velocity will be much higher, approaching the
        "Fermi" velocity (motion in the empty space between the molecules of the copper wire),
        which can be millions of meters per second (and can approach the speed of light,
        300,000,000 meters/second).  When numbers are plugged into the above derivation for
        what might be a typical device: 
             1.  A neodymium permanent magnet with a magnetic field of 10,000 gauss
             2.  A magnetic core completely containing the magnetic field (such as a nanocrystalline
        core)
             3.  A main core thickness of about 25 millimeters
             4. An external core which might be 12 millimeters above the surface of the main core
             5.  Windings around the external core to carry electrons.
         
           If we assume a velocity of 1,000 meters/second, moving away from the main core surface,
        the particle will see an effective electric field of about 100 volts/meter.  This is not
        insignificant.  Note that once the charged particle is in motion, the particle gains kinetic
        energy simply from moving through the gradient of the magnetic vector potential.  Of course, when the particle is moving toward the main core surface it will lose kinetic energy.
         
           NOTE:  if the A-potential is also time-varying, there is the additional influence due to that
        variation, but for the purpose of proving the influence of a static A-potential, that is not
        part of the present discussion.
         
           A possible device that could exploit this is:
         
            Figure 2:   Physical arrangement of a device to test this theory
            Go to "Files" then go to the folder "MESSAGE ATTACHMENTS", go to the folder
        "Experiments with a new A-poten", and open "Experiments with a new A-potential
        theory Fig2.bmp".
         
           The main core has a magnetic field that is parallel to its surface.  The direction of this
        field can be in and out of the this page, or left to right across the page,  only the gradient
        of the magnetic-vector-potential which forms this field, which is perpendicular to the main
        core surface, is important.
         
           The external core has a primary winding, driven by voltage taken from a coil wound
        around the main core, and a secondary winding used to detect changes in the
        external core's magnetic field.
         
          Note that the electron moving away from the main core experiences an acceleration,
        whereas the electron moving toward the core will experience a deceleration.  Assuming
        nothing happens to tap the electron kinetic energy, one-time around the loop and the
        electron will end up with the same energy it had when starting.  Michael Berry
         ( http://www.phy.bris.ac.uk/staff/berry_mv.html ) says that even though this is true, the
        phase of the particle as determined by its wave equation will not be the same.  Thus
        something has changed during the motion around the external core.  In addition, there
        will be synchrotron radiation because of the acceleration/deceleration of the charged
        particle, although the Larmor formula indicates that for the given conditions this
        radiation energy will be very small.  It is my belief, and the direction of my current
        experiments, to determine that the faster motion of the charged particles changes the
        magnetic field in the external core, since to the external core this appears to the core
        to be a larger current.  As long as this external core contains all the induced magnetic
        field, such as a toroid, this magnetic field will not produce a Lorentz force ( velocity
        times magnetic field) to deflect and interfere with the particle motion.
         
          A build-up has been constructed, using a Honeywell amorphous nanocrystalline core,
        AMCC-320, a nedymium magnet, and a "bridge" MOSFET driver to induce voltage into
        a coil which drives electrons into the winding on the external core.  The coil driven by
        the MOSFETs is 10 turns, the coil driving current through the winding on the external
        core is 60 turns.  The winding on the external core is a bifilar winding of 24 turns, with
        a secondary winding of 24 turns.  The bifilar winding is to pursuade the electrons in the
        winding to move near the surface of the wire, hopefully increasing their velocity.  The
        value of the load resistor is variable, typically enough to cause a current flow of about
        40 mA, which is a good number of electrons in motion.
        NOTE: bifilar means two wires wound in parallel together, always side-by-side.
         
           Figure 3:   A simple schematic of the current test set-up.
            Go to "Files" then go to the folder "MESSAGE ATTACHMENTS", go to the folder
        "Experiments with a new A-poten", and open "Experiments with a new A-potential
        theory Fig3.bmp".
         
          Note that the winding on the external core is connected so that electron flow will
        be in the same direction on each of the wires of the bifilar winding to and through the
        load resistor.
         
          To date, experiments to detect this effect have been inconclusive. This is probably
        because the charged particles must have a significant velocity relative to the drift
        velocity ( and hence travelling on the surface of the wire ), which is not the normal
        electron path at low frequencies in a wire, and the influence of the voltages used in
        providing a driving voltage on the external core's secondary winding which masks
        what is a small effect in comparison (parasitic capacitance between the bifilar core
        and the oscilloscope 'sense' winding).
          It may be that only by the use of several drive windings and external-core windings
        will there be a clear effect observed due to a multiplying effect of each external
        winding on the total voltage/current flow (a ping-pong as explained by others).
         
           I purchased an inexpensive gaussmeter and Neodymium  magnets from ForceField/WonderMagnet, http://www.wondermagnet.com
          There are plans for an inexpensive gaussmeter at:
          Dr. Bearden has mentioned some guidelines of MEG construction in
        and some pitfalls of MEG operation in
           When you read this closely, and consider the A-interaction outlined above, it
        makes sense.
         
        David J.
         
      • davedameron
        Hi David and all, Thanks for an interesting post. I have been investigating the convective derivative of the A field as it relates to an induced E field, and
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 11 11:31 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi David and all,
          Thanks for an interesting post. I have been investigating the
          convective derivative of the A field as it relates to an induced E
          field, and have not found a
          theory that works completely with experiments. The A field predicts
          the emf generated in a transformer- using the partial time
          derivative,
          in addition the convective derivative works for a coil moving w.r.t.
          a
          magnet or another coil.

          However for the simple case of a crosspiece moving on 2 rails in a
          uniform magnetic field, it gives an incorrect answer. There are
          other examples. In addition, using an electron beam in a CRT with
          velocities about 10E7 m/s, no effects of a force could be detected.
          The CRT neck was placed in the hole of a toroidal coil which produced
          the switched A field.
          -Dave D.

          --- In MEG_builders@yahoogroups.com, "David Jenkins" <djenkins@r...>
          wrote:
          > Experiments with a new A-potential theory.
          >
          > In searching the internet for information on the interaction of
          the magnetic
          > vector potential (A) and charged particles, the following
          information was gleaned
          > from a lecture summary:
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.