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The MEG

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  • Kari
    Hi, I just have a couple of questions. First, is this a powered generator and if is what is the power in vs the power out? Secondly, how exactly does it work?
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 15, 2002
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      Hi,

      I just have a couple of questions.

      First, is this a powered generator and if is what is the power in vs
      the power out?

      Secondly, how exactly does it work?


      Thanks in advance for your answers,

      Kari
    • BobW
      Kari You will, no doubt, get many better explanations of What is the MEG and How does it work but here is my simple understanding. The MEG is a transformer
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 15, 2002
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        Kari
        You will, no doubt, get many better explanations of "What is the MEG" and "How does it work" but here is my simple understanding.
        The MEG is a transformer and control circuit hooked up in such a fashion as to produce electrical energy in excess of the amount of electrical energy required to drive it.�
        Successful claims are in the 2 to 7 times more output than input with some claims going as high as 100 (that claim resulted in destruction of the MEG coil)....but sadly, most claims are below unity.�
        How does it work.....very good question?� I still have the question, "Does it work?" but to continue the effort that question is a waste of time.� Several MEGs have been constructed with the builder claiming success at Over Unity (more out than in.)� Many many more have been constructed without the OU results.� My MEG is still on the bench requiring more wire and refinement of the control circuit before I can attempt to measure the efficiency...but I have not ruled out success!�
        My best theory is this:� The MEG is powered with a pulse that delivers energy during a short time into the input winding.� This creates magnetic and electrostatic fields that�cause a voltage at the output winding terminals.� This output voltage is loaded (usually only during the peaks of the output waves so as not to impede the flipping action) which cause counter fields or reflections back through the core to the input winding while delivering energy to the output load.� Now, imagine these reflections returning at just the right time to assist in the "next" drive pulse.� With proper phasing and loading and drive pulse characteristics this "flyback" energy reduces the power needed in the next input pulse.� After a few cycles the MEG is then running with less energy coming from the input power supply than is being delivered to the load.� I call this state, "Megavation."� During Megavation the input energy is supplied by the input control logic and the flyback fields which are supported by the flipping permanent magnet flux....left, right, left, right....
        A very popular theory that others have stated is:� The input pulse switches off the flux coming from the permanent magnet in one leg (right.)� Having a better path to follow that flux�moves to the left leg.� The next input pulse switches off the left leg which causes the permanent magnet flux to flip to the right leg.� This action continues cycle after cycle.� Like a transistor, if the input power required to switch the permanent magnet flux back and forth is less than the energy that can be delivered to the load from the output windings then you have OU.�
        This is accomplished by having a 3 legged transformer where the outside legs have output coils and the center leg is a permanent magnet.� The control windings are located on the top cross bar to the left and right of the permanent magnet.� The driving signals�are phased to reduce the magnetic flux in one leg �(say the right)�which will cause the permanent magnet to send more of its flux to the other leg (right leg).� Then the driving signals reverse this action.��
        In any event, the input energy is only needed to provide flux gating of the permanent magnets flux.� The permanent magnet is then expected to supply the energy in the output windings and to�supply (in my favorite theory) the energy for the flyback and to somehow replenish it between surges.� Some call this action "regauge" which simply means (in this case) that if you remove energy from a the�permanent magnet, the magnet itself will replenish it.
        This is truly an interesting project and well worth the effort if only in the form of education....
        Are you planning to build a MEG, Kari?
        Best�wishes
        Bob
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