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On Ephesians 2:8-9

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  • Christopher Orr
    ...At the other end of the Christian life, many saints (as recognized later by the Church) died with a profound sense of their own sinfulness and unworthiness
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 25, 2008
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      ...At the other end of the Christian life, many saints (as recognized later
      by the Church) died with a profound sense of their own sinfulness and
      unworthiness before a Holy God. I have found the Orthodox approach to
      Scriptures, especially on matters of salvation, to be very "integrative."
      Christ's incarnation, ministry, death, descent into hades, resurrection,
      ascension; our sinfulness, repentance, baptism, carrying our cross, 'doing
      to the least of these', running the race, confidence in God's love and
      mercy, fear of falling away, putting on the new nature, . . . . *There is no
      tendency to pick one aspect of salvation "to reinterpret everything else to
      fit." The parable of the goats and the sheep is taken as seriously as
      Ephesians 2:8-9.*

      Orthodoxy often insists that the whole truth lies in holding on to two (or
      more) apparently contradictory concepts: God is both One God, and Three
      Persons; Christ is one person, two natures. The same applies to our
      salvation. On many points where a Protestant wants and *either/or* answer,
      an Orthodox will insist on *both/and.*

      - From *"*Differences Between Orthodox Teaching on Salvation and That of
      Protestants" by Paul Jacobson (
      http://www.stjohndc.org/Russian/orthhtrdx/e_Protestants.HTM)


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