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Re: Two issues I have

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  • mygourami
    This was very helpful. It helps me understand, as I am the daughter of immigrants (Caribbean Islands) and we always greet family and friends that way and do
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 14, 2012
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      This was very helpful. It helps me understand, as I am the daughter of immigrants (Caribbean Islands) and we always greet family and friends that way and do venerate our elders so to speak. Its a 'cultural' thing that disappeared when the puritans came over the great pond.

      --- In LutheransLookingEast@yahoogroups.com, randall hay <stortford@...> wrote:
      >
      > Actually, I was thinking last night that I really should get more knowledgeable about this stuff, and writing a blurb might force me to think things through a little more clearly.
      >
      >
      > ---My thinking about this originally came as I pondered the number of Greek words that have to do with reverencing/venerating, and how we Americans seem to have lost almost all of it..it's as if nothing is holy in the world, or above us....that the Kingdom of Heaven has vanished.
      >
      > In fact, while Scripture has a number of words for it, we don't even have a single one!  If we talk about "venerating" people we seem quite mad...likewise "reverencing," and we'd better not try bowing in the workplace, or people will be hinting that we should call the Employee Assistance hotline.  There is a bit about "respect" floating around in our culture, but mostly among overpaid professional athletes.  
      >
      > Something unique about the Orthodox approach is that kissing is--literally--often involved. We not only bow, but also kiss.  We kiss our spouses, of course; but also icons, Bibles, crosses, corpses at funerals, the chalice, various holy objects...and people!  "Greet ye one another with a holy kiss."  It's hard to get used to, but it is Scriptural.  God is love...and so bows and kisses go together.  
      >
      > Because God blesses veneration, we really don't worry about germs.  If you are sick, nobody cares if they receive Eucharist from the spoon after you did, or venerate the same icons after you did, etc.  This is true even when viruses, colds and the flu are flying around.  We don't get sick more often, so we don't worry about it. 
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      > R.
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      > >________________________________
      > > From: Richard K. Futrell <PastorFutrell@...>
      > >To: LutheransLookingEast@yahoogroups.com
      > >Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2012 8:40 AM
      > >Subject: Re: [LutheransLookingEast] Two issues I have
      > >
      > >
      > > 
      > >
      > >
      > >Randall,
      > >
      > >No apologies for "gong on so long." I have never heard such an
      > >explanation before, and it helps clear up some misconceptions (although
      > >Lutherans reverence the altar, not to worship the altar but because it
      > >is the place where Jesus comes to us in His body and blood).
      > >
      > >Have you written a paper on such "reverencing." I'd like to mull
      > >over this topic theologically. It seems we in the west have a blind
      > >spot on this when you brought out all the biblical examples.
      > >
      > >Pr RF
      > >
      > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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      > >
      > >
      > >
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      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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