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Re: Five Best Books on Prayer

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  • Andrew
    I should have stated that I have indeed sought to follow a rule of prayer, and (Glory to God!), rather successfully. I ve been praying the morning, afternoon,
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 1, 2007
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      I should have stated that I have indeed sought to follow a rule of
      prayer, and (Glory to God!), rather successfully. I've been praying
      the morning, afternoon, and evening prayers from that little red book
      that the Antiochian Archdiocese has published. I've also sought to
      incorporate the Jesus Prayer us much as I am able during the day (in
      between and sometimes during classes, in the car, during my shifts at
      Starbucks, etc.).

      The reason I asked about the five best books on prayer is because I've
      already experienced some of the fruit of this effort to pray everyday;
      there's been a constant sense of the abiding presence of God -- a
      presence I can't recall ever being so acutely aware of. It's opened up
      an understanding of communion with God that, quite frankly, has blown
      me away. In fact, it's been so incredible that I've afraid it's too
      good to be true. I'm worried that I'll wake up one day, realize that
      it was all just some chemical imbalance in my brain, and think that it
      was nice while it lasted.

      May it not be! Pray for me that I would continue to wrestle with God
      as did Jacob, and in a sense, I guess, force Him to bless me with His
      abiding presence.

      Andrew.

      --- In LutheransLookingEast@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher Orr"
      <xcjorr@...> wrote:
      >
      > The Way of a Pilgrim is a good intro to the spirit of the Jesus
      Prayer. A
      > schemamonk I know always recommends the writings of St. Ignaty
      > Brianchaninov, and I would recommend St. Theophan the Recluse on
      prayer and
      > the spiritual life ("The Spiritual Life", "The Path to Salvation",
      "Unseen
      > Warfare"; "The Art of Prayer" by Igumen Chariton is also primarily
      composed
      > of selections from St. Theophan). Others often point to Metropolitan
      > Anthony Bloom's "Beginning to Pray" and Archimandrite Sophrony's "On
      > Prayer". A good summation of the Philokalia on prayer and the
      ascetic life
      > is "The Way of the Ascetics" by Tito Colliander.
      >
      > However, the best book to learn prayer from is a Prayer Book. Prayer
      > teaches prayer. Choose a small rule to pray morning and evening,
      perhaps a
      > Canon or Akathist once a week, and 'never let the Jesus Prayer be
      far from
      > you', as my spiritual father said. And, of course, attendance at
      the Divine
      > Services is also essential - especially Matins and/or Vespers since
      you can
      > then hear the changeable hymns for the feast and seasons of the year.
      >
      > The general rule is to pray with your attention focused on the
      meaning of
      > the words themselves with the sense that God is present all around
      you. Do
      > not create or accept images, sounds, smells, etc. while praying, and
      don't
      > worry about the proper posture, breathing, location or accouterments
      (i.e.,
      > icons, incense, candles) - just start praying. Praying with
      attention is
      > best, but praying while distracted is better than no prayer at all - God
      > will take note of your obedience and desire. We are to pray like a
      candle:
      > upright and on fire. If you cannot understand or concentrate, then
      let your
      > standing in the Temple during services be your offering.
      >
      > You are laying your foundation of prayer. If there is one thing I
      wish I
      > would have done better in my conversion it would have been to better
      > establish myself in a prayer rule. Pray more than you read.
      >
      > Christopher
      >
      >
      >
      > On 5/30/07, Andrew <drew1095950@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Can anyone please tell me what they believe to be the best five
      books
      > > on prayer?
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > >
      > > Andrew.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Christopher Orr
      Wonderful! I have found these kinds of blessings to be preparation in the same way that that first rush of dating someone and the rush of the honeymoon period,
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 1, 2007
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        Wonderful!

        I have found these kinds of blessings to be preparation in the same way that
        that first rush of dating someone and the rush of the honeymoon period, etc.
        are preparation for the deeper, not always so dramatic, experiences of a
        marriage. Enjoy these experiences.

        St. Theophan speaks of how these feelings and experiences are then later
        taken away as an opportunity to be obedient, to struggle, and in some sense
        to win what has (and will again) be given. Another Orthodox speaker once
        said that miracles (and such experiences are) take away our free will - we
        HAVE to believe if we see something like that. Miracles rob of us the
        blessedness of those that have not seen and yet believe. There seems to be
        a cycling of blessings and trials, blessings and trials that spiral us
        upward.

        Christopher


        On 6/1/07, Andrew <drew1095950@...> wrote:
        >
        > I should have stated that I have indeed sought to follow a rule of
        > prayer, and (Glory to God!), rather successfully. I've been praying
        > the morning, afternoon, and evening prayers from that little red book
        > that the Antiochian Archdiocese has published. I've also sought to
        > incorporate the Jesus Prayer us much as I am able during the day (in
        > between and sometimes during classes, in the car, during my shifts at
        > Starbucks, etc.).
        >
        > The reason I asked about the five best books on prayer is because I've
        > already experienced some of the fruit of this effort to pray everyday;
        > there's been a constant sense of the abiding presence of God -- a
        > presence I can't recall ever being so acutely aware of. It's opened up
        > an understanding of communion with God that, quite frankly, has blown
        > me away. In fact, it's been so incredible that I've afraid it's too
        > good to be true. I'm worried that I'll wake up one day, realize that
        > it was all just some chemical imbalance in my brain, and think that it
        > was nice while it lasted.
        >
        > May it not be! Pray for me that I would continue to wrestle with God
        > as did Jacob, and in a sense, I guess, force Him to bless me with His
        > abiding presence.
        >
        > Andrew.
        >
        > --- In LutheransLookingEast@yahoogroups.com<LutheransLookingEast%40yahoogroups.com>,
        > "Christopher Orr"
        >
        > <xcjorr@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > The Way of a Pilgrim is a good intro to the spirit of the Jesus
        > Prayer. A
        > > schemamonk I know always recommends the writings of St. Ignaty
        > > Brianchaninov, and I would recommend St. Theophan the Recluse on
        > prayer and
        > > the spiritual life ("The Spiritual Life", "The Path to Salvation",
        > "Unseen
        > > Warfare"; "The Art of Prayer" by Igumen Chariton is also primarily
        > composed
        > > of selections from St. Theophan). Others often point to Metropolitan
        > > Anthony Bloom's "Beginning to Pray" and Archimandrite Sophrony's "On
        > > Prayer". A good summation of the Philokalia on prayer and the
        > ascetic life
        > > is "The Way of the Ascetics" by Tito Colliander.
        > >
        > > However, the best book to learn prayer from is a Prayer Book. Prayer
        > > teaches prayer. Choose a small rule to pray morning and evening,
        > perhaps a
        > > Canon or Akathist once a week, and 'never let the Jesus Prayer be
        > far from
        > > you', as my spiritual father said. And, of course, attendance at
        > the Divine
        > > Services is also essential - especially Matins and/or Vespers since
        > you can
        > > then hear the changeable hymns for the feast and seasons of the year.
        > >
        > > The general rule is to pray with your attention focused on the
        > meaning of
        > > the words themselves with the sense that God is present all around
        > you. Do
        > > not create or accept images, sounds, smells, etc. while praying, and
        > don't
        > > worry about the proper posture, breathing, location or accouterments
        > (i.e.,
        > > icons, incense, candles) - just start praying. Praying with
        > attention is
        > > best, but praying while distracted is better than no prayer at all - God
        > > will take note of your obedience and desire. We are to pray like a
        > candle:
        > > upright and on fire. If you cannot understand or concentrate, then
        > let your
        > > standing in the Temple during services be your offering.
        > >
        > > You are laying your foundation of prayer. If there is one thing I
        > wish I
        > > would have done better in my conversion it would have been to better
        > > establish myself in a prayer rule. Pray more than you read.
        > >
        > > Christopher
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > On 5/30/07, Andrew <drew1095950@...> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Can anyone please tell me what they believe to be the best five
        > books
        > > > on prayer?
        > > >
        > > > Thanks,
        > > >
        > > > Andrew.
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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