Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Oticon on telecoils

Expand Messages
  • David
    Oticon s Instructions for Use booklet for its new Epoq hearing aids offers this comment on its telecoils: 5. Telecoil use in church, theatre, or cinema An
    Message 1 of 11 , Nov 2, 2009
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment

      Oticon's "Instructions for Use" booklet for its new Epoq hearing aids offers this comment on its telecoils:

      5. Telecoil use in church, theatre, or cinema

      An increasing number of churches, theatres and public buildings often have loop systems installed.  These systems send out wireless sound to be received by the telecoil in your hearing instrument.  Typically, a sign will let you know whether the place has a telecoil.  Ask your Hearing Care Professional for details.

      :)

      Dave Myers

    • Loretta Butler
      Dave, This is nice. However, the statement Typically a sign will let you know whether the place has a telecoil . Well, I guess Oticon meant to say whether
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 2, 2009
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        Dave,   This is nice.  However, the statement "Typically a sign will let you know whether the place has a telecoil".
         
        Well, I guess Oticon meant to say "whether the place has a loop system"
         
        Loretta
         
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: David
        Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 7:38 AM
        Subject: [Loops_and_Telecoils] Oticon on telecoils

         

        Oticon's "Instructions for Use" booklet for its new Epoq hearing aids offers this comment on its telecoils:

        5. Telecoil use in church, theatre, or cinema

        An increasing number of churches, theatres and public buildings often have loop systems installed.  These systems send out wireless sound to be received by the telecoil in your hearing instrument.  Typically, a sign will let you know whether the place has a telecoil.  Ask your Hearing Care Professional for details.

        :)

        Dave Myers

      • Judy G. Martin
        I think this is an excellent piece of news. The idea that it is even IN the booklet is progress. Oticon is a leader in the field and it is to be hoped that
        Message 3 of 11 , Nov 2, 2009
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          I think this is an excellent piece of news.  The idea that it is even IN the booklet is progress.  Oticon is a leader in the field and it is to be hoped that they will follow suit in their other manuals and that other manufacturers will do the same.  Any awareness is better than no awareness.

          Judy in Jax


          On Nov 2, 2009, at 11:08 AM, Loretta Butler wrote:


          Dave,   This is nice.  However, the statement "Typically a sign will let you know whether the place has a telecoil".
           
          Well, I guess Oticon meant to say "whether the place has a loop system"
           
          Loretta
           
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: David
          Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 7:38 AM
          Subject: [Loops_and_Telecoil s] Oticon on telecoils

           

          Oticon's "Instructions for Use" booklet for its new Epoq hearing aids offers this comment on its telecoils:

          5. Telecoil use in church, theatre, or cinema

          An increasing number of churches, theatres and public buildings often have loop systems installed.  These systems send out wireless sound to be received by the telecoil in your hearing instrument.  Typically, a sign will let you know whether the place has a telecoil.  Ask your Hearing Care Professional for details.

          :)

          Dave Myers




        • David
          Loretta, I checked . . . that wasn t a typo! (I m guessing their brochure is written by someone who s not an expert . . . and perhaps even by someone whose
          Message 4 of 11 , Nov 2, 2009
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            Loretta, I checked . . . that wasn't a typo! (I'm guessing their
            brochure is written by someone who's not an expert . . . and perhaps
            even by someone whose native language is not English: "An increasing
            number . . . often have").

            Still, the point is made, and welcome.

            Dave



            --- In Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com, "Loretta Butler"
            <lbutler864@...> wrote:
            >
            > Dave, This is nice. However, the statement "Typically a sign will let
            you know whether the place has a telecoil".
            >
            > Well, I guess Oticon meant to say "whether the place has a loop
            system"
            >
            > Loretta
            >
            >
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: David
            > To: Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 7:38 AM
            > Subject: [Loops_and_Telecoils] Oticon on telecoils
            >
            >
            >
            > Oticon's "Instructions for Use" booklet for its new Epoq hearing aids
            offers this comment on its telecoils:
            >
            > 5. Telecoil use in church, theatre, or cinema
            >
            > An increasing number of churches, theatres and public buildings often
            have loop systems installed. These systems send out wireless sound to be
            received by the telecoil in your hearing instrument. Typically, a sign
            will let you know whether the place has a telecoil. Ask your Hearing
            Care Professional for details.
            >
            >
            >
            > Dave Myers
            >
          • Dana Mulvany
            A lot of people make the same mistake. They ll say that a wireless telephone has a telecoil in it, for example, probably because there isn t an easy way to
            Message 5 of 11 , Nov 2, 2009
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              A lot of people make the same mistake.  They'll say that a wireless telephone has a telecoil in it, for example, probably because there isn't an easy way to refer to the phone providing an inductive field.

              David, is there any place on your web site that shows what a telecoil actually looks like?   (It would also be interesting to see how wireless phones typically provide an inductive field, though that's probably beyond the scope of your web site.  Frankly, I don't know whether wireless phones use a different mechanism now than the phones of old did.  It would be nice to see a visual diagram of how the field is generated by the phone or loop system, and then picked up by the telecoil, though.)

              I know that Steve Barber is good at finding visual images, so I'll pick on him to see if he can do that!  Has anyone else found a good visual illustration of this sort of thing already, though?

              Dana 




              On Mon, Nov 2, 2009 at 12:06 PM, David <myers@...> wrote:


              Loretta, I checked . . . that wasn't a typo!  (I'm guessing their
              brochure is written by someone who's not an expert . . . and perhaps
              even by someone whose native language is not English:  "An increasing
              number . . . often have").

              Still, the point is made, and welcome.

              Dave



              --- In Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com, "Loretta Butler"
              <lbutler864@...> wrote:
              >
              > Dave, This is nice. However, the statement "Typically a sign will let
              you know whether the place has a telecoil".
              >
              > Well, I guess Oticon meant to say "whether the place has a loop
              system"
              >
              > Loretta
              >
              >
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: David
              > To: Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 7:38 AM
              > Subject: [Loops_and_Telecoils] Oticon on telecoils
              >
              >
              >
              > Oticon's "Instructions for Use" booklet for its new Epoq hearing aids
              offers this comment on its telecoils:
              >
              > 5. Telecoil use in church, theatre, or cinema
              >
              > An increasing number of churches, theatres and public buildings often
              have loop systems installed. These systems send out wireless sound to be
              received by the telecoil in your hearing instrument. Typically, a sign
              will let you know whether the place has a telecoil. Ask your Hearing
              Care Professional for details.
              >
              >
              >
              > Dave Myers

            • Robert MacPherson
              Nothing new in how the wireless phones generate the electromagnetic field from the audio signal delivered to it s receiver - better called a speaker, more
              Message 6 of 11 , Nov 2, 2009
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                Nothing new in how the wireless phones generate the electromagnetic field
                from the audio signal delivered to it's receiver - better called a speaker,
                more exactly to the "voice coil" of the speaker. This field interacts with
                the static field of a permanent magnet, causing it to move with the audio
                signal. Attached to a diaphragm, the result is audio.

                Same as phones of old, loudspeakers and headphones - it's the stray field
                from the voice coil http://tinyurl.com/ycvaas8 that feeds our telecoils.

                Bob
                ......





                -----Original Message-----
                From: Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com
                [mailto:Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Dana Mulvany
                Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 7:21 PM
                To: Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com
                Cc: Steve Barber
                Subject: Re: [Loops_and_Telecoils] Re: Oticon on telecoils

                SNIP.....


                (It would also be interesting to see how wireless phones typically
                provide an inductive field, though that's probably beyond the scope of your
                web site. Frankly, I don't know whether wireless phones use a different
                mechanism now than the phones of old did. It would be nice to see a visual
                diagram of how the field is generated by the phone or loop system, and then
                picked up by the telecoil, though.)


                I know that Steve Barber is good at finding visual images, so I'll pick on
                him to see if he can do that! Has anyone else found a good visual
                illustration of this sort of thing already, though?


                Dana







                On Mon, Nov 2, 2009 at 12:06 PM, David <myers@...> wrote:



                Loretta, I checked . . . that wasn't a typo! (I'm guessing their
                brochure is written by someone who's not an expert . . . and perhaps
                even by someone whose native language is not English: "An increasing
                number . . . often have").

                Still, the point is made, and welcome.

                Dave



                --- In Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com, "Loretta Butler"

                <lbutler864@...> wrote:
                >
                > Dave, This is nice. However, the statement "Typically a sign will let
                you know whether the place has a telecoil".
                >
                > Well, I guess Oticon meant to say "whether the place has a loop
                system"
                >
                > Loretta
                >
                >
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: David
                > To: Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 7:38 AM
                > Subject: [Loops_and_Telecoils] Oticon on telecoils
                >
                >
                >
                > Oticon's "Instructions for Use" booklet for its new Epoq hearing aids
                offers this comment on its telecoils:
                >
                > 5. Telecoil use in church, theatre, or cinema
                >
                > An increasing number of churches, theatres and public buildings often
                have loop systems installed. These systems send out wireless sound to be
                received by the telecoil in your hearing instrument. Typically, a sign
                will let you know whether the place has a telecoil. Ask your Hearing
                Care Professional for details.
                >
                >
                >

                > Dave Myers
              • Oval Window Audio/Norman Lederman
                Hi Dana, I m not sure if I can send attachments to the list...so let s see what happens. Attached is a low res photo that shows what a passive telecoil looks
                Message 7 of 11 , Nov 2, 2009
                View Source
                Hi Dana,

                I'm not sure if I can send attachments to the list...so let's see what
                happens. Attached is a low res photo that shows what a passive telecoil
                looks like. "Active" telecoils have additional electronics packaged
                with the telecoil to provide boosting and/or other adjustments to the
                coil's signal.

                Of course there are websites by the manufacturers of telecoils. I
                believe this photo came from Tibbets.

                Norman
                Oval Window Audio

                Dana Mulvany wrote:
                >
                >
                > A lot of people make the same mistake. They'll say that a wireless
                > telephone has a telecoil in it, for example, probably because there
                > isn't an easy way to refer to the phone providing an inductive field.
                >
                >
                > David, is there any place on your web site that shows what a telecoil
                > actually looks like? (It would also be interesting to see how
                > wireless phones typically provide an inductive field, though that's
                > probably beyond the scope of your web site. Frankly, I don't know
                > whether wireless phones use a different mechanism now than the phones
                > of old did. It would be nice to see a visual diagram of how the field
                > is generated by the phone or loop system, and then picked up by the
                > telecoil, though.)
                >
                > I know that Steve Barber is good at finding visual images, so I'll
                > pick on him to see if he can do that! Has anyone else found a good
                > visual illustration of this sort of thing already, though?
                >
                > Dana
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > On Mon, Nov 2, 2009 at 12:06 PM, David <myers@...
                > <mailto:myers@...>> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > Loretta, I checked . . . that wasn't a typo! (I'm guessing their
                > brochure is written by someone who's not an expert . . . and perhaps
                > even by someone whose native language is not English: "An increasing
                > number . . . often have").
                >
                > Still, the point is made, and welcome.
                >
                > Dave
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com
                > <mailto:Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com>, "Loretta Butler"
                > <lbutler864@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > Dave, This is nice. However, the statement "Typically a sign
                > will let
                > you know whether the place has a telecoil".
                > >
                > > Well, I guess Oticon meant to say "whether the place has a loop
                > system"
                > >
                > > Loretta
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > From: David
                > > To: Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com
                > <mailto:Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com>
                > > Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 7:38 AM
                > > Subject: [Loops_and_Telecoils] Oticon on telecoils
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Oticon's "Instructions for Use" booklet for its new Epoq hearing
                > aids
                > offers this comment on its telecoils:
                > >
                > > 5. Telecoil use in church, theatre, or cinema
                > >
                > > An increasing number of churches, theatres and public buildings
                > often
                > have loop systems installed. These systems send out wireless sound
                > to be
                > received by the telecoil in your hearing instrument. Typically, a sign
                > will let you know whether the place has a telecoil. Ask your Hearing
                > Care Professional for details.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Dave Myers
                >
                >
                >
              • Dana Mulvany
                Thanks, Norman. I ve seen pictures of telecoils before myself, but I was thinking that to help clear up the public s confusion about inductive technology and
                Message 8 of 11 , Nov 2, 2009
                View Source
                • 0 Attachment
                  Thanks, Norman.  I've seen pictures of telecoils before myself, but I was thinking that to help clear up the public's confusion about inductive technology and telecoils, it would be really useful if there was a public web page illustrating what telecoils look like and how they work with loop systems and inductive fields from phones and loop systems.

                  The web page could also show the relative sizes of telecoils versus the "voice coils" from telephones. 

                  Visual images can be so much more powerful than words, and much easier for many people to understand.  (It would be so useful if we could see other telecoil-related information, like the difference in how different hearing aid companies position their telecoils.)

                  Dana 


                  On Mon, Nov 2, 2009 at 5:52 PM, Oval Window Audio/Norman Lederman <norman@...> wrote:
                  <*>[Attachment(s) from Oval Window Audio/Norman Lederman included below]

                  Hi Dana,

                  I'm not sure if I can send attachments to the list...so let's see what
                  happens.  Attached is a low res photo that shows what a passive telecoil
                  looks like.  "Active" telecoils have additional electronics packaged
                  with the telecoil to provide boosting and/or other adjustments to the
                  coil's signal.

                  Of course there are websites by the manufacturers of telecoils.  I
                  believe this photo came from Tibbets.

                  Norman
                  Oval Window Audio

                  Dana Mulvany wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > A lot of people make the same mistake.  They'll say that a wireless
                  > telephone has a telecoil in it, for example, probably because there
                  > isn't an easy way to refer to the phone providing an inductive field.
                  >
                  >
                  > David, is there any place on your web site that shows what a telecoil
                  > actually looks like?   (It would also be interesting to see how
                  > wireless phones typically provide an inductive field, though that's
                  > probably beyond the scope of your web site.  Frankly, I don't know
                  > whether wireless phones use a different mechanism now than the phones
                  > of old did.  It would be nice to see a visual diagram of how the field
                  > is generated by the phone or loop system, and then picked up by the
                  > telecoil, though.)
                  >
                  > I know that Steve Barber is good at finding visual images, so I'll
                  > pick on him to see if he can do that!  Has anyone else found a good
                  > visual illustration of this sort of thing already, though?
                  >
                  > Dana
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On Mon, Nov 2, 2009 at 12:06 PM, David <myers@...
                  > <mailto:myers@...>> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >     Loretta, I checked . . . that wasn't a typo!  (I'm guessing their
                  >     brochure is written by someone who's not an expert . . . and perhaps
                  >     even by someone whose native language is not English:  "An increasing
                  >     number . . . often have").
                  >
                  >     Still, the point is made, and welcome.
                  >
                  >     Dave
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >     --- In Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com
                  >     <mailto:Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com>, "Loretta Butler"
                  >     <lbutler864@...> wrote:
                  >     >
                  >     > Dave, This is nice. However, the statement "Typically a sign
                  >     will let
                  >     you know whether the place has a telecoil".
                  >     >
                  >     > Well, I guess Oticon meant to say "whether the place has a loop
                  >     system"
                  >     >
                  >     > Loretta
                  >     >
                  >     >
                  >     >
                  >     > ----- Original Message -----
                  >     > From: David
                  >     > To: Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com
                  >     <mailto:Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com>
                  >     > Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 7:38 AM
                  >     > Subject: [Loops_and_Telecoils] Oticon on telecoils
                  >     >
                  >     >
                  >     >
                  >     > Oticon's "Instructions for Use" booklet for its new Epoq hearing
                  >     aids
                  >     offers this comment on its telecoils:
                  >     >
                  >     > 5. Telecoil use in church, theatre, or cinema
                  >     >
                  >     > An increasing number of churches, theatres and public buildings
                  >     often
                  >     have loop systems installed. These systems send out wireless sound
                  >     to be
                  >     received by the telecoil in your hearing instrument. Typically, a sign
                  >     will let you know whether the place has a telecoil. Ask your Hearing
                  >     Care Professional for details.
                  >     >
                  >     >
                  >     >
                  >     > Dave Myers
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  <*>Attachment(s) from Oval Window Audio/Norman Lederman:

                  <*> 1 of 1 Photo(s) http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Loops_and_Telecoils/attachments/folder/675185870/item/list
                   <*> Passive Telecoils on dime.jpg

                  ------------------------------------

                  Yahoo! Groups Links

                  <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
                     http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Loops_and_Telecoils/

                  <*> Your email settings:
                     Individual Email | Traditional

                  <*> To change settings online go to:
                     http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Loops_and_Telecoils/join
                     (Yahoo! ID required)

                  <*> To change settings via email:
                     mailto:Loops_and_Telecoils-digest@yahoogroups.com
                     mailto:Loops_and_Telecoils-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

                  <*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                     Loops_and_Telecoils-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                  <*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                     http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



                • David
                  ... telecoil ... Hi Dana, In my presentations I ve used an image that telecoil manufacturer Tibbetts (now Global Coils) sent me, which I found online at
                  Message 9 of 11 , Nov 2, 2009
                  View Source
                  • 0 Attachment


                    > > David, is there any place on your web site that shows what a telecoil
                    > > actually looks like?

                    Hi Dana,

                    In my presentations I've used an image that telecoil manufacturer Tibbetts (now Global Coils) sent me, which I found online at

                    http://www.dizziness-and-balance.com/disorders/hearing/hearing-aids/images/telecoils.jpg

                    I can send this to you in a ppt slide if you'd like.

                    Best to you,

                    Dave (www.davidmyers.org and www.hearingloop.org)

                  • Steve Barber
                    It might be a little optimistic, also, to assume that most looped (or ALD-supplied) places will have signs. SteveB ... From:
                    Message 10 of 11 , Nov 2, 2009
                    View Source
                    • 0 Attachment
                      It might be a little optimistic, also, to assume that most looped (or ALD-supplied) places will have signs.
                       
                      SteveB
                       
                       
                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of David
                      Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 2:06 PM
                      To: Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [Loops_and_Telecoils] Re: Oticon on telecoils

                       



                      Loretta, I checked . . . that wasn't a typo! (I'm guessing their
                      brochure is written by someone who's not an expert . . . and perhaps
                      even by someone whose native language is not English: "An increasing
                      number . . . often have").

                      Still, the point is made, and welcome.

                      Dave

                      --- In Loops_and_Telecoils @yahoogroups. com, "Loretta Butler"
                      <lbutler864@ ...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Dave, This is nice. However, the statement "Typically a sign will let
                      you know whether the place has a telecoil".
                      >
                      > Well, I guess Oticon meant to say "whether the place has a loop
                      system"
                      >
                      > Loretta
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: David
                      > To: Loops_and_Telecoils @yahoogroups. com
                      > Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 7:38 AM
                      > Subject: [Loops_and_Telecoil s] Oticon on telecoils
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Oticon's "Instructions for Use" booklet for its new Epoq hearing aids
                      offers this comment on its telecoils:
                      >
                      > 5. Telecoil use in church, theatre, or cinema
                      >
                      > An increasing number of churches, theatres and public buildings often
                      have loop systems installed. These systems send out wireless sound to be
                      received by the telecoil in your hearing instrument. Typically, a sign
                      will let you know whether the place has a telecoil. Ask your Hearing
                      Care Professional for details.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Dave Myers
                      >

                    • Steve Barber
                      Here s a google search that will find lots of images of telecoils. Not sure how to find images showing the HAC end of the problem; that would be harder.
                      Message 11 of 11 , Nov 2, 2009
                      View Source
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Here's a google search that will find lots of images of telecoils.  Not sure how to find images showing the "HAC" end of the problem; that would be harder. 
                         
                         
                        Also not sure how to reliably know which images are not in the public domain.  I've heard (but can't prove) that images on government sites are usually available for public use.  Many private or even some corporate images could probably also be used, but the assumption should be that they are not free for the taking.  You can ask for permission of course, and many sites may grant permission.  Not sure what the rules are for including an existing image by referencing its URL rather than actually copying it to your own site, but I'm sure that's done often and perhaps without problems?
                         
                        BTW, you can find images for just about anything with regular google search terms at this address:
                         
                         
                        Use simple rules like
                         
                        -- A "term" may be a single string with no blanks or a string that has quotes around it with mutiple blanks
                        -- Quotes around a string will treat the entire multi-word string as a single term and not as individual words
                        -- Found images will include those on pages that mention all the terms if such pages exist.
                        -- Images that are on pages that only include some of the terms will only be shown if no pages exist with all the terms.
                        -- A minus sign (-) in front of a term will exclude any "hits" that have that term.
                         
                        Examples:
                         
                        To find lots of images related to shoes, the term would be: 
                         
                            shoes
                         
                        To find images related to both shoes and gloves, the search string would be:
                         
                            shoes gloves
                         
                        To find lots of images related to horse shoes but not other shoes (or horses) the term would be:
                         
                            "horse shoes"
                         
                         To find all images of that mention a blue suede shoes, the term would be:
                         
                            "blue suede shoes"
                         
                        But that will get a lot of Elvis stuff you may not want.
                         
                        To find only images that mention blue suede shoes and don't mention elvis the search string would be:
                         
                            "blue suede shoes" -elvis
                         
                        You can exclude images related to carl perkins too, if you want:
                         
                            "blue suede shoes" -elvis -"carl perkins"
                         
                        But  you're on your own on the copyright issue.
                         
                        SteveB
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                         
                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: dana.mulvany@... [mailto:dana.mulvany@...]On Behalf Of Dana Mulvany
                        Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 7:21 PM
                        To: Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com
                        Cc: Steve Barber
                        Subject: Re: [Loops_and_Telecoils] Re: Oticon on telecoils

                        A lot of people make the same mistake.  They'll say that a wireless telephone has a telecoil in it, for example, probably because there isn't an easy way to refer to the phone providing an inductive field.

                        David, is there any place on your web site that shows what a telecoil actually looks like?   (It would also be interesting to see how wireless phones typically provide an inductive field, though that's probably beyond the scope of your web site.  Frankly, I don't know whether wireless phones use a different mechanism now than the phones of old did.  It would be nice to see a visual diagram of how the field is generated by the phone or loop system, and then picked up by the telecoil, though.)

                        I know that Steve Barber is good at finding visual images, so I'll pick on him to see if he can do that!  Has anyone else found a good visual illustration of this sort of thing already, though?

                        Dana 




                        On Mon, Nov 2, 2009 at 12:06 PM, David <myers@...> wrote:


                        Loretta, I checked . . . that wasn't a typo!  (I'm guessing their
                        brochure is written by someone who's not an expert . . . and perhaps
                        even by someone whose native language is not English:  "An increasing
                        number . . . often have").

                        Still, the point is made, and welcome.

                        Dave



                        --- In Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com, "Loretta Butler"
                        <lbutler864@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Dave, This is nice. However, the statement "Typically a sign will let
                        you know whether the place has a telecoil".
                        >
                        > Well, I guess Oticon meant to say "whether the place has a loop
                        system"
                        >
                        > Loretta
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > From: David
                        > To: Loops_and_Telecoils@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 7:38 AM
                        > Subject: [Loops_and_Telecoils] Oticon on telecoils
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Oticon's "Instructions for Use" booklet for its new Epoq hearing aids
                        offers this comment on its telecoils:
                        >
                        > 5. Telecoil use in church, theatre, or cinema
                        >
                        > An increasing number of churches, theatres and public buildings often
                        have loop systems installed. These systems send out wireless sound to be
                        received by the telecoil in your hearing instrument. Typically, a sign
                        will let you know whether the place has a telecoil. Ask your Hearing
                        Care Professional for details.
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Dave Myers

                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.