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Re: Speaking of Rentals...

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  • Alice Singleton
    Contact the Metropolitan Tenants Organization. They;re in the 1100 block of Milwaukee. Ask for Rasheeda. Also lookup Paul Bernstein. He is an attorney who
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 31, 2008
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      Contact the Metropolitan Tenants Organization. They;re in the 1100
      block of Milwaukee. Ask for Rasheeda.

      Also lookup Paul Bernstein. He is an attorney who specializes in
      landlord/tenant rights issues (co-authored the '86 ordinance). I don't
      have his number but he's in the book and MTO has it.

      If your landlord fails to return your security deposit or pay
      interest, he must pay you x4 and x2 your deposit respectfully. If he
      has co-mingled your deposit then it's an additional x2, plus all of
      your legal fees. You are allowed a reasonable amount of wear and tear
      on our unit, so unless you took a hammer and knocked gapping holes in
      the wall, the landlord can't charge you for reasonable use of your unit.

      --- In LoganSquare@yahoogroups.com, "Jennifer" <jmlong.rm@...> wrote:
      >
      > I've contacted our former landlord and manager several times since
      > moving and still haven't received our deposit or even a portion of our
      > deposit...
    • Jennifer
      Thank you so much for all of the responses and the links on renters rights. I ve had 3 apartments here and have never received any interest on the deposit. I
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 31, 2008
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        Thank you so much for all of the responses and the links on renters
        rights. I've had 3 apartments here and have never received any
        interest on the deposit. I had no idea.

        Hector - I definitely didn't know anything about doubling the deposit
        refund. I wrote a separate check for the deposit, I've never received
        any interest annually and I don't know what the charges for wear and
        tear will be.

        Our landlord and owner isn't Jay Strauss or Regent Realty - that
        situation is a mess.

        Tomorrow is day 45 from the move out so we'll see what happens. I'll
        probably get a call around 4:59 asking to meet to give me the check.
        If not, I'll send a certified letter tomorrow asking for the deposit
        in full plus interest and see where that gets me. If it gets me
        nothing - I'll take it to the next level.

        Wish us luck!

        Jennifer
      • Jane Heron
        Jennifer-I think you can look up the City s landlord-tenant code on line. As a landlord, I can tell you that it gives a 45 day period for the refund and yes,
        Message 3 of 12 , Feb 1 7:00 AM
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          Jennifer-I think you can look up the City's landlord-tenant code on line. As a landlord, I can tell you that it gives a 45 day period for the refund and yes, interest is due unless it's a 3 or 4-flat with a live-in owner. Jane
        • laine morreau
          All of my Chicago landlords have given me interest annually. For instance, we moved to a new place in Logan Square in April. In November our landlord gave us
          Message 4 of 12 , Feb 1 8:24 AM
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            All of my Chicago landlords have given me interest
            annually. For instance, we moved to a new place in
            Logan Square in April. In November our landlord gave
            us a check for $16, as that's how much interest had
            accrued on our deposit as of that date. I assume he
            will give us the interest accrued b/t November and
            April when we renew with him at the end of March. All
            of my Chicago landlords have done something similar,
            though some of them have given a check for interest at
            renewal or move-out only (so, once a year instead of
            twice like my newest landlord).

            Also, by law your landlord has to provide your deposit
            return, with all deductions itemized, within 30 days
            of you moving out. If the landlord used the entirety
            of the deposit to repair the unit you occupied (HIGHLY
            unlikely), they still have to provide an itemized list
            of expenditures within 30 days.

            I would send a notarized letter (or Certified, as your
            landlord will have to acknowledge receipt with a
            signature) asking for your deposit and outlining your
            case in relation to law (i.e. that it has been more
            than 30 days, and law requires 30-day turnaround,
            etc.). If you still get no response/deposit, I would
            take them to court for the deposit plus all costs
            incurred in your recovery of said deposit (court
            costs, etc.). Hope this helps.
            --- Jennifer <jmlong.rm@...> wrote:

            > I've contacted our former landlord and manager
            > several times since
            > moving and still haven't received our deposit or
            > even a portion of our
            > deposit...
          • Jason Guthartz
            ... Actually, the 30-day period relates to written notice of damage. The landlord has 45 days to return your security deposit. See earlier messages. ... I
            Message 5 of 12 , Feb 1 11:00 AM
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              --- In LoganSquare@yahoogroups.com, laine morreau <lmorreau@...> wrote:
              > Also, by law your landlord has to provide your deposit
              > return, with all deductions itemized, within 30 days
              > of you moving out. If the landlord used the entirety
              > of the deposit to repair the unit you occupied (HIGHLY
              > unlikely), they still have to provide an itemized list
              > of expenditures within 30 days.

              Actually, the 30-day period relates to written notice of damage. The
              landlord has 45 days to return your security deposit. See earlier
              messages.


              > I would send a notarized letter (or Certified, as your
              > landlord will have to acknowledge receipt with a
              > signature) asking for your deposit and outlining your
              > case in relation to law (i.e. that it has been more
              > than 30 days, and law requires 30-day turnaround,
              > etc.). If you still get no response/deposit, I would
              > take them to court for the deposit plus all costs
              > incurred in your recovery of said deposit (court
              > costs, etc.). Hope this helps.

              I see no reason for sending a notarized letter -- certified/return
              receipt is good enough.

              I would suggest adding "cc: [name of attorney], Esq." (even if you
              haven't yet spoken with an attorney) at the bottom of your letter,
              just to show you mean business.

              And, as indicated earlier, you will be entitled to twice your security
              deposit, plus court costs and attorney's fees.

              Jason
            • rwludemann
              I represented my brother in just such a suit. The landlord compelely ignored us both, but after I filed a suit and got a judgment, they paid the whole thing -
              Message 6 of 12 , Feb 1 2:55 PM
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                I represented my brother in just such a suit. The landlord
                compelely ignored us both, but after I filed a suit and got a
                judgment, they paid the whole thing - twice the entire deposit,
                costs, and my fees. So it works.

                I would be happy to share a sample complaint with you or do it
                myself for a small fee. Please contact me off the list if you'd
                like.

                Robert Ludemann



                --- In LoganSquare@yahoogroups.com, "Jason Guthartz" <jguthartz@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Actually, the 30-day period relates to written notice of damage.
                The
                > landlord has 45 days to return your security deposit. See earlier
                > messages.
                >
                > I see no reason for sending a notarized letter -- certified/return
                > receipt is good enough.
                >
                > I would suggest adding "cc: [name of attorney], Esq." (even if you
                > haven't yet spoken with an attorney) at the bottom of your letter,
                > just to show you mean business.
                >
                > And, as indicated earlier, you will be entitled to twice your
                security
                > deposit, plus court costs and attorney's fees.
                >
                > Jason
                >
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