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Re: [LoganSquare] blame to go around

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  • Laurie Tanenbaum
    I don t know a single teacher who works 5-6 hour days - because being in the classroom is not their only job. They get to spend the rest of the work day
    Message 1 of 78 , Sep 30, 2007
      I don't know a single teacher who works 5-6 hour days - because being in the classroom is not their only job. They get to spend the rest of the work day planning, prepping and grading papers, working out the best ways to work with individual's who need extra support. Most of this gets done at home. I have never met a teacher whose job was 5-6 hours in a classroom and it ended there. Laurie


      On Sunday, September 30, 2007, at 07:54AM, "Denise Lynch" <lynchdm@...> wrote:

      <snip>
      >Oh, yeah, they wanted a shorter school day to take care of
      >all their paperwork and to meet with parents after school. Check out
      >the teacher parking lot when school lets out, they peel out! The public
      >school day is 5 hours and 45 minutes - voted for and approved by the
      >union...
    • Bradley Reeg
      A good point! When I was in grammar school at Nixon (Keeler & Dickens) in the early 60s we had 16-year-olds dropping out of 8th grade. The difference back then
      Message 78 of 78 , Oct 8 1:50 PM
        A good point!

        When I was in grammar school at Nixon (Keeler & Dickens) in the early
        60s we had 16-year-olds dropping out of 8th grade. The difference
        back then is that there wasn't "social promotion," so these doofii
        (plural of doofus) had been held back for three years, and they
        couldn't just stop coming because there were truant officers to drag
        them back.

        At Lane in 63 my freshman wood shop partner offered me some meth. The
        teachers there were on average a notch above what you'd find in
        neighborhood high schools, but they had their fair share numbnuts and
        clock-watchers.

        Despite it all I somehow managed to get a graduate degree and have a
        comfortable middle-class existence.

        Brad Reeg


        On Oct 8, 2007, at 12:06 AM, John Lofton wrote:

        > I'm not sure there ever was a golden age of education in this country.
        > In 1950 a high school graduate who was a lousy student could still
        > find
        > a job that paid a decent living wage. Not anymore.
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