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Re: [livingworld] Re: Observations for On-line Region/ Play [Long]

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  • dargall345@aol.com
    ... I don t see how this would happen. A ftf game arrives as a packet [or used to. But even if it also is just an e-mail now, the form should be distinctly
    Message 1 of 31 , Sep 1, 2000
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      In a message dated 8/31/00 9:05:22 PM !!!First Boot!!!, tyler@... writes:

      >
      > Once any real world regional modules can be played on-line, they will all
      > be available on-line. Anyone within a region can order a module and the
      > only effective measure is disallowing all real-world regional modules
      > on-line. That way everyone knows that playing them on-line is disallowed.
      > If any of them are played on-line too many people will make the honest
      > mistake of thinking they don't need to ask permission first and will just
      > start running them.
      I don't see how this would happen. A ftf game arrives as a packet
      [or used to. But even if it also is just an e-mail now, the form should be
      distinctly different.] while the on-line game would arrive as pure e-mail.
      So the DM knows right from the start which way he is authorized to use the
      adventure.

      >
      > Now with an on-line region, it becomes simple to determine which modules
      > were authorized on-line and which weren't. Only the core modules and
      > modules set in the on-line region are authorized.
      >
      > > I have trouble understanding how many Triads you think are going to
      > > offer up events with major specialty items or region-specific plot
      > > breaking opportunities. Do you really expect these volunteers to
      > > be this short-sighted about the material they've been working so
      > > hard on?
      >
      > How many modules do you think I'm going to write or authorize that aren't
      > strongly tied to the region and it's plot lines? The first module or two
      > played by an player and going to have a lot of mysterious stuff that the
      > player doesn't get. However after the initial module or two the player
      > should begin understand those things, and how they fit into the region. If
      > on-line players can only dabble in a region, they're going to be missing a
      > whole dimension of the campaign.
      >
      What you are saying is that the player who dabbles loses out. This is
      a counter to the claim that those picking & choosing will have an unfair
      advantage. & it is quite possible a number of online players will play only
      or heavily in one region. In any case, it is no argument against online play.

      David Argall
      dargall345@...
    • dargall345@aol.com
      ... I don t see how this would happen. A ftf game arrives as a packet [or used to. But even if it also is just an e-mail now, the form should be distinctly
      Message 31 of 31 , Sep 1, 2000
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        In a message dated 8/31/00 9:05:22 PM !!!First Boot!!!, tyler@... writes:

        >
        > Once any real world regional modules can be played on-line, they will all
        > be available on-line. Anyone within a region can order a module and the
        > only effective measure is disallowing all real-world regional modules
        > on-line. That way everyone knows that playing them on-line is disallowed.
        > If any of them are played on-line too many people will make the honest
        > mistake of thinking they don't need to ask permission first and will just
        > start running them.
        I don't see how this would happen. A ftf game arrives as a packet
        [or used to. But even if it also is just an e-mail now, the form should be
        distinctly different.] while the on-line game would arrive as pure e-mail.
        So the DM knows right from the start which way he is authorized to use the
        adventure.

        >
        > Now with an on-line region, it becomes simple to determine which modules
        > were authorized on-line and which weren't. Only the core modules and
        > modules set in the on-line region are authorized.
        >
        > > I have trouble understanding how many Triads you think are going to
        > > offer up events with major specialty items or region-specific plot
        > > breaking opportunities. Do you really expect these volunteers to
        > > be this short-sighted about the material they've been working so
        > > hard on?
        >
        > How many modules do you think I'm going to write or authorize that aren't
        > strongly tied to the region and it's plot lines? The first module or two
        > played by an player and going to have a lot of mysterious stuff that the
        > player doesn't get. However after the initial module or two the player
        > should begin understand those things, and how they fit into the region. If
        > on-line players can only dabble in a region, they're going to be missing a
        > whole dimension of the campaign.
        >
        What you are saying is that the player who dabbles loses out. This is
        a counter to the claim that those picking & choosing will have an unfair
        advantage. & it is quite possible a number of online players will play only
        or heavily in one region. In any case, it is no argument against online play.

        David Argall
        dargall345@...
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