Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Body for the 226E Hudson

Expand Messages
  • artemisjim
    Hi Folks: I realize that the locomotive I am writing about is a prewar Lionel, but I need help. I am trying to find a fairly decent body for a 1938 Lionel
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 21, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Folks:
      I realize that the locomotive I am writing about is a prewar Lionel, but I need help.  I am trying to find a fairly decent body for a 1938 Lionel 226E.  My 226E runs like a top, but looks like it got dropped tail-end first.  FYI, I am not the offending party, and my Will is being changed.
      I looked at eBay and a few other sites without success.  Can anyone point me in the right direction or know where I might source one?  It doesn't have to be perfect;  just in one piece.  I have no problems with imperfect paint, scratches, repaint, etc.  I believe you can contact me Off List if there is a concern.
      Jim Hamill

       

    • Pete Serrino
      Is the cab bent or broken? If bent they can be straightened. If broken, JB weld can repair it. Pete
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 21, 2014
      • 0 Attachment
        Is the cab bent or broken? If bent they can be straightened. If broken, JB weld can repair it.

        Pete
        Hi Folks:
        I realize that the locomotive I am writing about is a prewar Lionel, but I need help.  I am trying to find a fairly decent body for a 1938 Lionel 226E.  My 226E runs like a top, but looks like it got dropped tail-end first.  FYI, I am not the offending party, and my Will is being changed.
        I looked at eBay and a few other sites without success.  Can anyone point me in the right direction or know where I might source one?  It doesn't have to be perfect;  just in one piece.  I have no problems with imperfect paint, scratches, repaint, etc.  I believe you can contact me Off List if there is a concern.
        Jim Hamill

         



      • Jim Hamill
        Hi Pete: the cab is missing a large chunk. About as much surface area as a quarter on one corner. There are other major dings, too. I thought about molding a
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 21, 2014
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Pete:  the cab is missing a large chunk.
          About as much surface area as a quarter on one corner.  There are other major dings, too.
          I thought about molding a piece from the cab of a
          2046, but haven't a clue how to do it or attach it when I am done.  That's why I'm hunting for a replacement body.
          Jim Hamill
          203-788-3106


          Sent from my iPhone

          On Jul 21, 2014, at 1:03 PM, "Pete Serrino serrino@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

           

          Is the cab bent or broken? If bent they can be straightened. If broken, JB weld can repair it.

          Pete
          Hi Folks:
          I realize that the locomotive I am writing about is a prewar Lionel, but I need help.  I am trying to find a fairly decent body for a 1938 Lionel 226E.  My 226E runs like a top, but looks like it got dropped tail-end first.  FYI, I am not the offending party, and my Will is being changed.
          I looked at eBay and a few other sites without success.  Can anyone point me in the right direction or know where I might source one?  It doesn't have to be perfect;  just in one piece.  I have no problems with imperfect paint, scratches, repaint, etc.  I believe you can contact me Off List if there is a concern.
          Jim Hamill

           



        • Pete Serrino
          Jim, Thats unfortunate. Otherwise a repair would not be that difficult if you had all the pieces. I am not all that familiar with the Pre War variants having
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 21, 2014
          • 0 Attachment
            Jim, Thats unfortunate. Otherwise a repair would not be that difficult if you had all the pieces. I am not all that familiar with the Pre War variants having only a 1666 pre war engine but know there are some differences with their Post War siblings. One option if you can't locate a complete 226 shell would be to find an engine with with the same cab and cut and splice the good cab on the damaged shell. I mentioned JB Weld as that is the only way I know of to hold the pieces together. Solder won't work.

            Pete
            Hi Pete:  the cab is missing a large chunk.
            About as much surface area as a quarter on one corner.  There are other major dings, too.
            I thought about molding a piece from the cab of a
            2046, but haven't a clue how to do it or attach it when I am done.  That's why I'm hunting for a replacement body.
            Jim Hamill

          • Thomas McLean
            That boiler is very similar to the 2046/646 as well as the berkshire. There are some slight differences in the trim and dome details. Probably will just
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 21, 2014
            • 0 Attachment
              That boiler is very similar to the 2046/646 as well as the berkshire. There are some slight differences in the trim and dome details. Probably will just interchange. I'd have to research more to be sure.-TM
               
              Thomas M. McLean
               
               


              From: "Pete Serrino serrino@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com>
              To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, July 21, 2014 2:40 PM
              Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] Body for the 226E Hudson

               
              Jim, Thats unfortunate. Otherwise a repair would not be that difficult if you had all the pieces. I am not all that familiar with the Pre War variants having only a 1666 pre war engine but know there are some differences with their Post War siblings. One option if you can't locate a complete 226 shell would be to find an engine with with the same cab and cut and splice the good cab on the damaged shell. I mentioned JB Weld as that is the only way I know of to hold the pieces together. Solder won't work.

              Pete
              Hi Pete:  the cab is missing a large chunk.
              About as much surface area as a quarter on one corner.  There are other major dings, too.
              I thought about molding a piece from the cab of a
              2046, but haven't a clue how to do it or attach it when I am done.  That's why I'm hunting for a replacement body.
              Jim Hamill



            • Pete Serrino
              I believe the closest complete shell, if not identical, is the 1946 version of the 726 Berkshire. It has the smaller sand dome and open area in front of the
              Message 6 of 13 , Jul 21, 2014
              • 0 Attachment
                I believe the closest complete shell, if not identical, is the 1946 version of the 726 Berkshire. It has the smaller sand dome and open area in front of the valve gear like the 226.

                I would suspect the cabs are all pretty similar between the 226, 726, 736 and 2046 though.

                Pete
                That boiler is very similar to the 2046/646 as well as the berkshire. There are some slight differences in the trim and dome details. Probably will just interchange. I'd have to research more to be sure.-TM
                 
                Thomas M. McLean
                 


              • 074pdrake .
                I m pretty sure they are different. I have a 226E, a 1946 726, and the later 2046 & 736. The 226E is noticably heavier and is a lot thicker in the firebox
                Message 7 of 13 , Jul 21, 2014
                • 0 Attachment

                  I'm pretty sure they are different. I have a 226E, a 1946 726, and the later 2046 & 736. The 226E is noticably heavier and is a lot thicker in the firebox area. It also has a piece of wire to simulate a pipe on the side. I believe the tender latch and trailing truck mounts are different too. The cab roofs could probably be "swapped". I'm not at home or I would check and know for sure.

                  Greg

                  On Jul 21, 2014 3:02 PM, "Pete Serrino serrino@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                   

                  I believe the closest complete shell, if not identical, is the 1946 version of the 726 Berkshire. It has the smaller sand dome and open area in front of the valve gear like the 226.

                  I would suspect the cabs are all pretty similar between the 226, 726, 736 and 2046 though.

                  Pete
                  That boiler is very similar to the 2046/646 as well as the berkshire. There are some slight differences in the trim and dome details. Probably will just interchange. I'd have to research more to be sure.-TM
                   
                  Thomas M. McLean
                   


                • Jim Hamill
                  Hi Greg: You re spot on. I thought of using a 2046 body, but the stainless steel piping would be lost on both sides of the firebox. Frankly, it s very
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jul 21, 2014
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hi Greg:
                    You're spot on.  I thought of using a 2046 body, but the stainless steel piping would be lost on both sides of the firebox.  Frankly, it's very attractive.  Also, the identification tag slots and indentation was phased out with the 2046 and 726 bodies.  This makes the 226E body unique.  That is why I am trying to find one.
                    If I could fix it, I would.  This particular 226E is not intended for display, but for use.  Our group is putting together two prewar displays for the Holidays.  One is box coupler and die-cast body steamers and the other is tin plate with latch couplers.  So, it's going to get used.  That's one of the reasons I'm not overly concerned with the paint, etc.  And, if I knew how to fix the hood of the cab, I would do it.  However, it's way beyond my scope of knowledge and pay grade.
                    Given that, I received a recommendation from Pete that I will try.  JB Weld.  There are some nicks and cracks that might help.  But, I'm still looking for that Lionel 226E-88 body.

                    Jim Hamill
                    New Milford, CT 06776-3210

                    What you learn, you keep forever! - K'ung Ch'iu
                    Cogito, ergo sum! - Rene DesCartes






                    To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                    From: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 15:11:38 -0500
                    Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] Body for the 226E Hudson

                     

                    I'm pretty sure they are different. I have a 226E, a 1946 726, and the later 2046 & 736. The 226E is noticably heavier and is a lot thicker in the firebox area. It also has a piece of wire to simulate a pipe on the side. I believe the tender latch and trailing truck mounts are different too. The cab roofs could probably be "swapped". I'm not at home or I would check and know for sure.

                    Greg

                    On Jul 21, 2014 3:02 PM, "Pete Serrino serrino@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                     

                    I believe the closest complete shell, if not identical, is the 1946 version of the 726 Berkshire. It has the smaller sand dome and open area in front of the valve gear like the 226.

                    I would suspect the cabs are all pretty similar between the 226, 726, 736 and 2046 though.

                    Pete
                    That boiler is very similar to the 2046/646 as well as the berkshire. There are some slight differences in the trim and dome details. Probably will just interchange. I'd have to research more to be sure.-TM
                     
                    Thomas M. McLean
                     




                  • Charles Brumbelow
                    Worth asking about the boiler here: Look at this on eBay: http://pages.ebay.com/link/?nav=item.view&alt=web&id=141348325589 Lionel 226E Original Motor
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jul 21, 2014
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Worth asking about the boiler here:

                      Look at this on eBay:


                      Lionel 226E Original Motor Assembly, E-Unit, Side Rails

                      These parts were stripped from a bad window boiler, but the roof might combine with your if he still has the boiler. 

                      Charles

                      On Jul 21, 2014, at 11:43 AM, "artemisjim@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                       

                      Hi Folks:
                      I realize that the locomotive I am writing about is a prewar Lionel, but I need help.  I am trying to find a fairly decent body for a 1938 Lionel 226E.  My 226E runs like a top, but looks like it got dropped tail-end first.  FYI, I am not the offending party, and my Will is being changed.
                      I looked at eBay and a few other sites without success.  Can anyone point me in the right direction or know where I might source one?  It doesn't have to be perfect;  just in one piece.  I have no problems with imperfect paint, scratches, repaint, etc.  I believe you can contact me Off List if there is a concern.
                      Jim Hamill

                       

                    • Jim Hamill
                      Thanks Charles. I am already in touch with that Seller. We ll see how it goes. However, I have never done a Cut-and-Paste splice. I may need some helpful
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jul 22, 2014
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Thanks Charles.  I am already in touch with that Seller.  We'll see how it goes.
                        However, I have never done a Cut-and-Paste splice.  I may need some helpful hints as to an approach.
                        More info to follow.

                        Jim Hamill
                        5 Fox Run
                        New Milford, CT 06776-3210
                        203-788-3106

                        What you learn, you keep forever! - K'ung Ch'iu
                        Cogito, ergo sum! - Rene DesCartes






                        To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                        From: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Mon, 21 Jul 2014 18:13:49 -0500
                        Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] Body for the 226E Hudson

                         

                        Worth asking about the boiler here:

                        Look at this on eBay:


                        Lionel 226E Original Motor Assembly, E-Unit, Side Rails

                        These parts were stripped from a bad window boiler, but the roof might combine with your if he still has the boiler. 

                        Charles

                        On Jul 21, 2014, at 11:43 AM, "artemisjim@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                         
                        Hi Folks:
                        I realize that the locomotive I am writing about is a prewar Lionel, but I need help.  I am trying to find a fairly decent body for a 1938 Lionel 226E.  My 226E runs like a top, but looks like it got dropped tail-end first.  FYI, I am not the offending party, and my Will is being changed.
                        I looked at eBay and a few other sites without success.  Can anyone point me in the right direction or know where I might source one?  It doesn't have to be perfect;  just in one piece.  I have no problems with imperfect paint, scratches, repaint, etc.  I believe you can contact me Off List if there is a concern.
                        Jim Hamill
                         



                      • Pete Serrino
                        Jim, I know my approach would be a little different here as I have a fairly well equipped machine shop but the idea would be the same. I would cut off the roof
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jul 22, 2014
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Jim, I know my approach would be a little different here as I have a fairly well equipped machine shop but the idea would be the same. I would cut off the roof of the donor shell slightly below the roof line. Then cut the roof off of your engine slightly above the roof line. A band saw would make it easier but a hacksaw would work. Then its a matter of filing the mating edges as flat as possible and finally finishing it up with sandpaper on a piece of plate glass or other very smooth flat surface.
                          In my case I would use a vertical milling machine to replace the filing and sanding steps but realize not many here might have access to this machine.
                          After bonding with epoxy and letting it cure for a day or two, file off the excess then fill any gaps with bondo or even Squadron putty if the gaps are tiny.
                          At least with the 226 you won't have to deal with relettering after you repaint it.

                          Pete
                          Thanks Charles.  I am already in touch with that Seller.  We'll see how it goes.
                          However, I have never done a Cut-and-Paste splice.  I may need some helpful hints as to an approach.
                          More info to follow.

                          Jim Hamill
                          5 Fox Run
                          New Milford, CT 06776-3210
                          203-788-3106

                          What you learn, you keep forever! - K'ung Ch'iu
                          Cogito, ergo sum! - Rene DesCartes

                        • Jim Hamill
                          Pete: Thanks for the ideas. In my own primitive way, I may approach it as you suggest if I can t find a 226E body. I will confess that it would scare the
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jul 22, 2014
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Pete: 
                            Thanks for the ideas.  In my own primitive way, I may approach it as you suggest if I can't find a 226E body.  I will confess that it would scare the daylights out of me to try it.  I may use a cab top from the 2046 series of bodies.  My two concerns are my lack of mechanical skills and the arc of the back of the 226E cab as opposed to the straight up and down of the 2046 style cab.  I thought about this last night (about 2:00AM) in a moment of ADHD compulsion.  I am going to measure the cab with a micrometer when I get home, just to be sure it's about the same size.  Another thought is that I might try and find someone with a 3D printer to generate a precise replica of the missing roof-line from composite material.  I haven't figured out how yet.  And, buying a $5,000.00 printer might upset someone else in the house.  She already has given up enough of the house to my obsession.

                            Jim Hamill
                            New Milford, CT 06776-3210

                            What you learn, you keep forever! - K'ung Ch'iu
                            Cogito, ergo sum! - Rene DesCartes


                            To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                            From: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:01:12 -0400
                            Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] Body for the 226E Hudson

                             

                            Jim, I know my approach would be a little different here as I have a fairly well equipped machine shop but the idea would be the same. I would cut off the roof of the donor shell slightly below the roof line. Then cut the roof off of your engine slightly above the roof line. A band saw would make it easier but a hacksaw would work. Then its a matter of filing the mating edges as flat as possible and finally finishing it up with sandpaper on a piece of plate glass or other very smooth flat surface.
                            In my case I would use a vertical milling machine to replace the filing and sanding steps but realize not many here might have access to this machine.
                            After bonding with epoxy and letting it cure for a day or two, file off the excess then fill any gaps with bondo or even Squadron putty if the gaps are tiny.
                            At least with the 226 you won't have to deal with relettering after you repaint it.

                            Pete
                            Thanks Charles.  I am already in touch with that Seller.  We'll see how it goes.
                            However, I have never done a Cut-and-Paste splice.  I may need some helpful hints as to an approach.
                            More info to follow.

                            Jim Hamill
                            5 Fox Run
                            New Milford, CT 06776-3210
                            203-788-3106

                            What you learn, you keep forever! - K'ung Ch'iu
                            Cogito, ergo sum! - Rene DesCartes


                          • Michael Rinaldi
                            Jim, a family member of mine in Eastchester NY has a 3D printer. Don t know if he will accomdate you but we can try if your interested. Mike
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jul 22, 2014
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Jim, a family member of mine in Eastchester NY has a 3D printer. Don't know if he will accomdate you but we can try if your interested.
                              Mike

                              Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad


                              From: Jim Hamill artemisjim@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains] <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com>;
                              To: Lionel Postwar <lionel_postwartrains@yahoogroups.com>;
                              Subject: RE: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] Body for the 226E Hudson
                              Sent: Tue, Jul 22, 2014 6:52:20 PM

                               

                              Pete: 
                              Thanks for the ideas.  In my own primitive way, I may approach it as you suggest if I can't find a 226E body.  I will confess that it would scare the daylights out of me to try it.  I may use a cab top from the 2046 series of bodies.  My two concerns are my lack of mechanical skills and the arc of the back of the 226E cab as opposed to the straight up and down of the 2046 style cab.  I thought about this last night (about 2:00AM) in a moment of ADHD compulsion.  I am going to measure the cab with a micrometer when I get home, just to be sure it's about the same size.  Another thought is that I might try and find someone with a 3D printer to generate a precise replica of the missing roof-line from composite material.  I haven't figured out how yet.  And, buying a $5,000.00 printer might upset someone else in the house.  She already has given up enough of the house to my obsession.

                              Jim Hamill
                              New Milford, CT 06776-3210

                              What you learn, you keep forever! - K'ung Ch'iu
                              Cogito, ergo sum! - Rene DesCartes


                              To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                              From: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                              Date: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 09:01:12 -0400
                              Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] Body for the 226E Hudson

                               

                              Jim, I know my approach would be a little different here as I have a fairly well equipped machine shop but the idea would be the same. I would cut off the roof of the donor shell slightly below the roof line. Then cut the roof off of your engine slightly above the roof line. A band saw would make it easier but a hacksaw would work. Then its a matter of filing the mating edges as flat as possible and finally finishing it up with sandpaper on a piece of plate glass or other very smooth flat surface.
                              In my case I would use a vertical milling machine to replace the filing and sanding steps but realize not many here might have access to this machine.
                              After bonding with epoxy and letting it cure for a day or two, file off the excess then fill any gaps with bondo or even Squadron putty if the gaps are tiny.
                              At least with the 226 you won't have to deal with relettering after you repaint it.

                              Pete
                              Thanks Charles.  I am already in touch with that Seller.  We'll see how it goes.
                              However, I have never done a Cut-and-Paste splice.  I may need some helpful hints as to an approach.
                              More info to follow.

                              Jim Hamill
                              5 Fox Run
                              New Milford, CT 06776-3210
                              203-788-3106

                              What you learn, you keep forever! - K'ung Ch'iu
                              Cogito, ergo sum! - Rene DesCartes


                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.