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671 seen at local flea market

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  • Bruce Sherman
    Walking near my home, there is a local flea market. a 671 caught my eye. The locomotive itself looked very clean, like someone cleaned it recently. The
    Message 1 of 18 , May 28 11:39 AM
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      Walking near my home, there is a local flea market.  a 671 caught my eye.  The locomotive itself looked very clean, like someone cleaned it recently.  The tender it came with was a whistle tender, the wheels had some light rust.  The 671 itself, the smoke stack caught my eye.  I am used to the empty hole of a pellet smoke unit.  This one had a white piece just inside with what looked like a couple of vent holes around the edges.  I know Lionel had a bulb type smoke unit.  I never saw what that looks like.  Could that be it?
       
      And now for the $64,000 question, I asked how much, he said $150.  I motioned like he is crazy and walked away.  This also included the flattened box for the tender, nothing for the locomotive.
       
      This flea market is more like people just selling used junk like rings and watches, and there is maybe just 3 tables max.
       
       
      Bruce
    • Toni & Brian
      The 1946 turbine, like the 46 Berkshire, is a totally different animal then the 47 and later models. The easiest way to determine if it is a 46 model, and
      Message 2 of 18 , May 28 12:51 PM
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        The 1946 turbine, like the 46 Berkshire, is a totally different animal then the 47 and later models.  The easiest way to determine if it is a 46 model, and hence a smoke bulb, is by the motor. The 46 motors are horizontal to the loco and frame, where the 47 and later motors are at an angle. The 46 smoke bulb units have a cast metal chamber that the bulb fits into.  The later ones have the standard type smoke unit. FYI the 46 turbines had less cast in detail in the body shells. One of the few times Lionel made changes and added detail.

         

        A  46 turbine might fetch $150 if it was real nice. Turbines are a weird item in that pricing sways wildly.  I wouldn’t pay more then $75 -$100 for a nice one.

         

        From: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com]
        Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 11:39 AM
        To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market

         

         

        Walking near my home, there is a local flea market.  a 671 caught my eye.  The locomotive itself looked very clean, like someone cleaned it recently.  The tender it came with was a whistle tender, the wheels had some light rust.  The 671 itself, the smoke stack caught my eye.  I am used to the empty hole of a pellet smoke unit.  This one had a white piece just inside with what looked like a couple of vent holes around the edges.  I know Lionel had a bulb type smoke unit.  I never saw what that looks like.  Could that be it?

         

        And now for the $64,000 question, I asked how much, he said $150.  I motioned like he is crazy and walked away.  This also included the flattened box for the tender, nothing for the locomotive.

         

        This flea market is more like people just selling used junk like rings and watches, and there is maybe just 3 tables max.

         

         

        Bruce

      • Thomas McLean
        With the smoke bulb unit, you can see the dimpled glass of the bulb. Now, there were conversion units to convert from the smoke bulb to the pill type unit, or
        Message 3 of 18 , May 28 1:24 PM
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          With the smoke bulb unit, you can see the dimpled glass of the bulb. Now, there were conversion units to convert from the smoke bulb to the pill type unit, or it could have been a custom smoke unit installation. 150? I got a nice unit on e bay for 120. or a bit less ,I forget now. Turbines are plentiful so look for a good one at any price.-TM
           
          Thomas M. McLean
           
           


          From: "'Bruce Sherman' brucesherman@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com>
          To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 2:39 PM
          Subject: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market

           
          Walking near my home, there is a local flea market.  a 671 caught my eye.  The locomotive itself looked very clean, like someone cleaned it recently.  The tender it came with was a whistle tender, the wheels had some light rust.  The 671 itself, the smoke stack caught my eye.  I am used to the empty hole of a pellet smoke unit.  This one had a white piece just inside with what looked like a couple of vent holes around the edges.  I know Lionel had a bulb type smoke unit.  I never saw what that looks like.  Could that be it?
           
          And now for the $64,000 question, I asked how much, he said $150.  I motioned like he is crazy and walked away.  This also included the flattened box for the tender, nothing for the locomotive.
           
          This flea market is more like people just selling used junk like rings and watches, and there is maybe just 3 tables max.
           
           
          Bruce


        • Bruce Sherman
          I am maybe thinking it could have been a liquid conversion?? Any photos of what they look like?? I didn’t take a good look in the rear of the model to see
          Message 4 of 18 , May 28 1:24 PM
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            I am maybe thinking it could have been a liquid conversion??  Any photos of what they look like??
             
            I didn’t take a good look in the rear of the model to see if I can see the motor, how it was mounted.
             
            You know what also bothered me.. sending off warning bells??  The E unit tab.  It looked brand new,  very shiny. I can understand cleaning the black metal body, (the 671 numbers looked factory, not a repaint.. maybe), but how do you reverse years of body oils tarnishing the tab??
             
            If it was maybe 1/2 the price, I would have taken a better look.  $150 on a untested model??  I don’t think so.
             
            Bruce
             
            Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 3:51 PM
            Subject: RE: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market
             
             

            The 1946 turbine, like the 46 Berkshire, is a totally different animal then the 47 and later models.  The easiest way to determine if it is a 46 model, and hence a smoke bulb, is by the motor. The 46 motors are horizontal to the loco and frame, where the 47 and later motors are at an angle. The 46 smoke bulb units have a cast metal chamber that the bulb fits into.  The later ones have the standard type smoke unit. FYI the 46 turbines had less cast in detail in the body shells. One of the few times Lionel made changes and added detail.

            A  46 turbine might fetch $150 if it was real nice. Turbines are a weird item in that pricing sways wildly.  I wouldn’t pay more then $75 -$100 for a nice one.

            From: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com]
            Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 11:39 AM
            To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market

             

            Walking near my home, there is a local flea market.  a 671 caught my eye.  The locomotive itself looked very clean, like someone cleaned it recently.  The tender it came with was a whistle tender, the wheels had some light rust.  The 671 itself, the smoke stack caught my eye.  I am used to the empty hole of a pellet smoke unit.  This one had a white piece just inside with what looked like a couple of vent holes around the edges.  I know Lionel had a bulb type smoke unit.  I never saw what that looks like.  Could that be it?

            And now for the $64,000 question, I asked how much, he said $150.  I motioned like he is crazy and walked away.  This also included the flattened box for the tender, nothing for the locomotive.

            This flea market is more like people just selling used junk like rings and watches, and there is maybe just 3 tables max.

            Bruce

          • Bruce Sherman
            Maybe a piece of plastic that covered the dimple of the glass bulb?? I have a couple of S2 Turbines (that is what I call them) Not really in the market for
            Message 5 of 18 , May 28 1:50 PM
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              Maybe a piece of plastic that covered the dimple of the glass bulb??  I have a couple of S2 Turbines (that is what I call them)  Not really in the market for another.  It just caught my attention, that is all.  I didn’t think $150 was a realistic price.  Some people see Lionel and see dollar signs.  Like I mentioned, how it looked, set off warning signs.
               
               
              Bruce
               
              Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 4:24 PM
              Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market
               
               

              With the smoke bulb unit, you can see the dimpled glass of the bulb. Now, there were conversion units to convert from the smoke bulb to the pill type unit, or it could have been a custom smoke unit installation. 150? I got a nice unit on e bay for 120. or a bit less ,I forget now. Turbines are plentiful so look for a good one at any price.-TM
               
              Thomas M. McLean
               
               
               

              From: "'Bruce Sherman' brucesherman@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com>
              To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 2:39 PM
              Subject: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market
               
               
              Walking near my home, there is a local flea market.  a 671 caught my eye.  The locomotive itself looked very clean, like someone cleaned it recently.  The tender it came with was a whistle tender, the wheels had some light rust.  The 671 itself, the smoke stack caught my eye.  I am used to the empty hole of a pellet smoke unit.  This one had a white piece just inside with what looked like a couple of vent holes around the edges.  I know Lionel had a bulb type smoke unit.  I never saw what that looks like.  Could that be it?
               
              And now for the $64,000 question, I asked how much, he said $150.  I motioned like he is crazy and walked away.  This also included the flattened box for the tender, nothing for the locomotive.
               
              This flea market is more like people just selling used junk like rings and watches, and there is maybe just 3 tables max.
               
               
              Bruce


            • Bob bunge
              Dead give away is the 46 doesn t have the e-unit hole on the top of the boiler. Instead there is a wire/plug and two sockets in the cab. The 46 is fun, but
              Message 6 of 18 , May 28 6:45 PM
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                Dead give away is the '46 doesn't have the e-unit hole on the top of the boiler.  Instead there is a wire/plug and two sockets in the cab.  The '46 is fun, but doesn't pull as well either.  

                Bob

                On May 28, 2014, at 4:50 PM, "'Bruce Sherman' brucesherman@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                Maybe a piece of plastic that covered the dimple of the glass bulb??  I have a couple of S2 Turbines (that is what I call them)  Not really in the market for another.  It just caught my attention, that is all.  I didn’t think $150 was a realistic price.  Some people see Lionel and see dollar signs.  Like I mentioned, how it looked, set off warning signs.
                 
                 
                Bruce
                 
                Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 4:24 PM
                Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market
                 
                 

                With the smoke bulb unit, you can see the dimpled glass of the bulb. Now, there were conversion units to convert from the smoke bulb to the pill type unit, or it could have been a custom smoke unit installation. 150? I got a nice unit on e bay for 120. or a bit less ,I forget now. Turbines are plentiful so look for a good one at any price.-TM
                 
                Thomas M. McLean
                 
                 
                 

                From: "'Bruce Sherman' brucesherman@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com>
                To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 2:39 PM
                Subject: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market
                 
                 
                Walking near my home, there is a local flea market.  a 671 caught my eye.  The locomotive itself looked very clean, like someone cleaned it recently.  The tender it came with was a whistle tender, the wheels had some light rust.  The 671 itself, the smoke stack caught my eye.  I am used to the empty hole of a pellet smoke unit.  This one had a white piece just inside with what looked like a couple of vent holes around the edges.  I know Lionel had a bulb type smoke unit.  I never saw what that looks like.  Could that be it?
                 
                And now for the $64,000 question, I asked how much, he said $150.  I motioned like he is crazy and walked away.  This also included the flattened box for the tender, nothing for the locomotive.
                 
                This flea market is more like people just selling used junk like rings and watches, and there is maybe just 3 tables max.
                 
                 
                Bruce


              • Ambika Parks
                I ve got the electronic set version of the 671 from 1947 with the larger atomic motor, red brush plate with the e-unit plug (though it also has a regular
                Message 7 of 18 , May 29 8:31 AM
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                  I've got the electronic set version of the 671 from 1947 with the larger atomic motor, red brush plate with the e-unit plug (though it also has a regular e-unit inside the engine as well), it seems to pull better than my dad's 671's from 1946 and 1948 (though that could be due to a lack of maintenance on his end).  To be fair though, I installed a traction weight in the 671 from 1947 when I bought it off of e-bay as it was missing one when it came in the mail (the front end would lift off the track on turns at high speed without it).  Was the 1947 version supposed to have a traction weight?
                   
                  Out of curiosity, which version of the 671 is supposed to pull better?
                   
                  Andy


                  On Wednesday, May 28, 2014 10:03 PM, "Bob bunge bbunge@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                   
                  Dead give away is the '46 doesn't have the e-unit hole on the top of the boiler.  Instead there is a wire/plug and two sockets in the cab.  The '46 is fun, but doesn't pull as well either.  

                  Bob

                  On May 28, 2014, at 4:50 PM, "'Bruce Sherman' brucesherman@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                  Maybe a piece of plastic that covered the dimple of the glass bulb??  I have a couple of S2 Turbines (that is what I call them)  Not really in the market for another.  It just caught my attention, that is all.  I didn’t think $150 was a realistic price.  Some people see Lionel and see dollar signs.  Like I mentioned, how it looked, set off warning signs.
                   
                   
                  Bruce
                   
                  Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 4:24 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market
                   
                   
                  With the smoke bulb unit, you can see the dimpled glass of the bulb. Now, there were conversion units to convert from the smoke bulb to the pill type unit, or it could have been a custom smoke unit installation. 150? I got a nice unit on e bay for 120. or a bit less ,I forget now. Turbines are plentiful so look for a good one at any price.-TM
                   
                  Thomas M. McLean
                   
                   
                   
                  From: "'Bruce Sherman' brucesherman@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com>
                  To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 2:39 PM
                  Subject: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market
                   
                   
                  Walking near my home, there is a local flea market.  a 671 caught my eye.  The locomotive itself looked very clean, like someone cleaned it recently.  The tender it came with was a whistle tender, the wheels had some light rust.  The 671 itself, the smoke stack caught my eye.  I am used to the empty hole of a pellet smoke unit.  This one had a white piece just inside with what looked like a couple of vent holes around the edges.  I know Lionel had a bulb type smoke unit.  I never saw what that looks like.  Could that be it?
                   
                  And now for the $64,000 question, I asked how much, he said $150.  I motioned like he is crazy and walked away.  This also included the flattened box for the tender, nothing for the locomotive.
                   
                  This flea market is more like people just selling used junk like rings and watches, and there is maybe just 3 tables max.
                   
                   
                  Bruce




                • John Warren
                  The prices on post war is dropping like a rock. Look, for example, at Trainz s postwar ebay offerings and you ll see how little Ex plus postwar is going for.
                  Message 8 of 18 , May 29 10:47 AM
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                    The prices on post war is dropping like a rock. Look, for example, at Trainz's postwar ebay offerings and you'll see how little Ex plus postwar is going for.
                     
                    As respects to your 671, I recently had an absolutly beautiful 681 (a 671 but with magnetraction, basically), that I tried to sell for almost a year, six local train show meets and York.
                    Started at $170, then down to $150, then to $130.
                     
                    Got tired of lugging it and sold it for $80.
                     
                    John ('Ski) Warren
                     
                    Visit: www.WarrenvilleRailroad.com

                    From: "Ambika Parks m1raje@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com>
                    To: "Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Thursday, May 29, 2014 11:31 AM
                    Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market

                     
                    I've got the electronic set version of the 671 from 1947 with the larger atomic motor, red brush plate with the e-unit plug (though it also has a regular e-unit inside the engine as well), it seems to pull better than my dad's 671's from 1946 and 1948 (though that could be due to a lack of maintenance on his end).  To be fair though, I installed a traction weight in the 671 from 1947 when I bought it off of e-bay as it was missing one when it came in the mail (the front end would lift off the track on turns at high speed without it).  Was the 1947 version supposed to have a traction weight?
                     
                    Out of curiosity, which version of the 671 is supposed to pull better?
                     
                    Andy


                    On Wednesday, May 28, 2014 10:03 PM, "Bob bunge bbunge@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                     
                    Dead give away is the '46 doesn't have the e-unit hole on the top of the boiler.  Instead there is a wire/plug and two sockets in the cab.  The '46 is fun, but doesn't pull as well either.  

                    Bob

                    On May 28, 2014, at 4:50 PM, "'Bruce Sherman' brucesherman@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                    Maybe a piece of plastic that covered the dimple of the glass bulb??  I have a couple of S2 Turbines (that is what I call them)  Not really in the market for another.  It just caught my attention, that is all.  I didn’t think $150 was a realistic price.  Some people see Lionel and see dollar signs.  Like I mentioned, how it looked, set off warning signs.
                     
                     
                    Bruce
                     
                    Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 4:24 PM
                    Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market
                     
                     
                    With the smoke bulb unit, you can see the dimpled glass of the bulb. Now, there were conversion units to convert from the smoke bulb to the pill type unit, or it could have been a custom smoke unit installation. 150? I got a nice unit on e bay for 120. or a bit less ,I forget now. Turbines are plentiful so look for a good one at any price.-TM
                     
                    Thomas M. McLean
                     
                     
                     
                    From: "'Bruce Sherman' brucesherman@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com>
                    To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 2:39 PM
                    Subject: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market
                     
                     
                    Walking near my home, there is a local flea market.  a 671 caught my eye.  The locomotive itself looked very clean, like someone cleaned it recently.  The tender it came with was a whistle tender, the wheels had some light rust.  The 671 itself, the smoke stack caught my eye.  I am used to the empty hole of a pellet smoke unit.  This one had a white piece just inside with what looked like a couple of vent holes around the edges.  I know Lionel had a bulb type smoke unit.  I never saw what that looks like.  Could that be it?
                     
                    And now for the $64,000 question, I asked how much, he said $150.  I motioned like he is crazy and walked away.  This also included the flattened box for the tender, nothing for the locomotive.
                     
                    This flea market is more like people just selling used junk like rings and watches, and there is maybe just 3 tables max.
                     
                     
                    Bruce






                  • Bruce Sherman
                    I took another look at it. The motor brush plate is visible from the rear of the engine. The motor is mounted on a angle, not horizontal or vertical, at
                    Message 9 of 18 , May 29 11:48 AM
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                      I took another look at it.  The motor brush plate is visible from the rear of the engine.  The motor is mounted on a angle, not horizontal or vertical, at least not what I would call it.  The smoke unit is still throwing me.  Its like a white piece of plastic was inserted in the smoke stack.
                       
                      I also noticed a 1060.  Isn't that a scout?  I didn’t even want to waste my time offering $5.  No tender.
                       
                       
                      Bruce
                       
                      Sent: Thursday, May 29, 2014 11:31 AM
                      Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market
                       
                       

                      I've got the electronic set version of the 671 from 1947 with the larger atomic motor, red brush plate with the e-unit plug (though it also has a regular e-unit inside the engine as well), it seems to pull better than my dad's 671's from 1946 and 1948 (though that could be due to a lack of maintenance on his end).  To be fair though, I installed a traction weight in the 671 from 1947 when I bought it off of e-bay as it was missing one when it came in the mail (the front end would lift off the track on turns at high speed without it).  Was the 1947 version supposed to have a traction weight?
                       
                      Out of curiosity, which version of the 671 is supposed to pull better?
                       
                      Andy


                      On Wednesday, May 28, 2014 10:03 PM, "Bob bunge bbunge@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                       
                      Dead give away is the '46 doesn't have the e-unit hole on the top of the boiler.  Instead there is a wire/plug and two sockets in the cab.  The '46 is fun, but doesn't pull as well either. 
                       
                      Bob

                      On May 28, 2014, at 4:50 PM, "'Bruce Sherman' brucesherman@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                      Maybe a piece of plastic that covered the dimple of the glass bulb??  I have a couple of S2 Turbines (that is what I call them)  Not really in the market for another.  It just caught my attention, that is all.  I didn’t think $150 was a realistic price.  Some people see Lionel and see dollar signs.  Like I mentioned, how it looked, set off warning signs.
                       
                       
                      Bruce
                       
                      Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 4:24 PM
                      Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market
                       
                       
                      With the smoke bulb unit, you can see the dimpled glass of the bulb. Now, there were conversion units to convert from the smoke bulb to the pill type unit, or it could have been a custom smoke unit installation. 150? I got a nice unit on e bay for 120. or a bit less ,I forget now. Turbines are plentiful so look for a good one at any price.-TM
                       
                      Thomas M. McLean
                       
                       
                       
                      From: "'Bruce Sherman' brucesherman@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com>
                      To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 2:39 PM
                      Subject: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market
                       
                       
                      Walking near my home, there is a local flea market.  a 671 caught my eye.  The locomotive itself looked very clean, like someone cleaned it recently.  The tender it came with was a whistle tender, the wheels had some light rust.  The 671 itself, the smoke stack caught my eye.  I am used to the empty hole of a pellet smoke unit.  This one had a white piece just inside with what looked like a couple of vent holes around the edges.  I know Lionel had a bulb type smoke unit.  I never saw what that looks like.  Could that be it?
                       
                      And now for the $64,000 question, I asked how much, he said $150.  I motioned like he is crazy and walked away.  This also included the flattened box for the tender, nothing for the locomotive.
                       
                      This flea market is more like people just selling used junk like rings and watches, and there is maybe just 3 tables max.
                       
                       
                      Bruce




                    • kennybaughman
                      Hello,I agree that postwar prices are dropping to prices I ve never seen since I started back in the hobby 13 years ago.I thought it was just me,but it is
                      Message 10 of 18 , Jun 2, 2014
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                        Hello,I agree that postwar prices are dropping to prices I've never seen since I started back in the hobby 13 years ago.I thought it was just me,but it is happening right before our eyes. My best guess on this is that everyone is going into Legacy and Command Control,and selling their now called"Conventional" engines to help pay the outragegous prices for the new engines.


                        And While this is good for the economy,and the hobby in general,postwar is dropping very QUICKLY.Once coveted items are being sold for a fraction of what they used to command,and the DCC craze is the only reason I can think of that these guys are unloading most of their postwar collections. 


                        I love it,because I am just starting to build my modest collection,and am going to be able to acquire some PRIMO stuff that just not so long ago,was not in my budget.

                        A PRIMO #681 used to bring $150.00 all day long,but with what's going on,$80.00 seems to be the new price for one.

                        Bad for Postwar dealers,TERRIFIC for postwar collectors!!!!!But I could not agree with you more about the prices dropping. Happy Railroading-Kenny Baughman

                      • Toni & Brian
                        It is not the DCC craze that drives it. It is demographics! The boomers that have a childhood connection to the postwar trains are aging and the younger
                        Message 11 of 18 , Jun 2, 2014
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                          It is not the DCC craze that drives it. It is demographics!  The boomers that have a childhood connection to the postwar trains are aging and the younger generations do not have an emotional connection to the Postwar stuff.  If you research the TCA records the number of collector/operators of toy trains has fallen off the map.  The numbers of collectors, born after 1980 in the TCA, number about 150. This is out of about 28,000 total members in the TCA. Your Postwar items will soon be doorstops.

                           

                          I have bought more trains locally thru Craig’s List in the last 6 months then I have in the last 6 years. Every one of the buys has the same basic story. The seller is between 65 and 80, they are downsizing, the kids nor the grandkids want the trains so they have to go.

                           

                          From: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com]
                          Sent: Monday, June 2, 2014 7:50 PM
                          To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market

                           

                           

                           

                           

                          Hello,I agree that postwar prices are dropping to prices I've never seen since I started back in the hobby 13 years ago.I thought it was just me,but it is happening right before our eyes. My best guess on this is that everyone is going into Legacy and Command Control,and selling their now called"Conventional" engines to help pay the outragegous prices for the new engines.

                           

                          And While this is good for the economy,and the hobby in general,postwar is dropping very QUICKLY.Once coveted items are being sold for a fraction of what they used to command,and the DCC craze is the only reason I can think of that these guys are unloading most of their postwar collections. 

                           

                          I love it,because I am just starting to build my modest collection,and am going to be able to acquire some PRIMO stuff that just not so long ago,was not in my budget.

                          A PRIMO #681 used to bring $150.00 all day long,but with what's going on,$80.00 seems to be the new price for one.

                          Bad for Postwar dealers,TERRIFIC for postwar collectors!!!!!But I could not agree with you more about the prices dropping. Happy Railroading-Kenny Baughman

                        • Tony
                          I have to agree with the sad truth.. Postwar just isn t bringing any money . I tried selling box cars I bought for between $30 and $40 for $10 and they are
                          Message 12 of 18 , Jun 3, 2014
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                            I have to agree with the sad truth.. Postwar just isn't bringing any money .. I tried selling box cars I bought for between $30 and $40 for $10 and they are not moving .. It's very sad..  You can put me in your retiring group.  I just turned 60 and I retire and downsize my home .. Now I only have a spare bedroom for trains .. Not near enough room to have a nice layout and storage for a big collection .. I'm trying to thin the herd and it's not going well ..
                             
                            I guess like everyone else .. The older ones are not buying anymore and the younger ones aren't interested in the postwar .. Again I think this true with all collectibles
                            IMHO  -  
                             
                             
                             
                             
                            -------Original Message-------
                             
                            Date: 6/3/2014 12:26:49 AM
                            Subject: RE: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market
                             
                             

                            It is not the DCC craze that drives it. It is demographics!  The boomers that have a childhood connection to the postwar trains are aging and the younger generations do not have an emotional connection to the Postwar stuff.  If you research the TCA records the number of collector/operators of toy trains has fallen off the map.  The numbers of collectors, born after 1980 in the TCA, number about 150. This is out of about 28,000 total members in the TCA. Your Postwar items will soon be doorstops.

                             

                            I have bought more trains locally thru Craig’s List in the last 6 months then I have in the last 6 years. Every one of the buys has the same basic story. The seller is between 65 and 80, they are downsizing, the kids nor the grandkids want the trains so they have to go.

                             

                            From: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com]
                            Sent: Monday, June 2, 2014 7:50 PM
                            To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market

                             

                             

                             

                             

                            Hello,I agree that postwar prices are dropping to prices I've never seen since I started back in the hobby 13 years ago.I thought it was just me,but it is happening right before our eyes. My best guess on this is that everyone is going into Legacy and Command Control,and selling their now called"Conventional" engines to help pay the outragegous prices for the new engines.

                             

                            And While this is good for the economy,and the hobby in general,postwar is dropping very QUICKLY.Once coveted items are being sold for a fraction of what they used to command,and the DCC craze is the only reason I can think of that these guys are unloading most of their postwar collections. 

                             

                            I love it,because I am just starting to build my modest collection,and am going to be able to acquire some PRIMO stuff that just not so long ago,was not in my budget.

                            A PRIMO #681 used to bring $150.00 all day long,but with what's going on,$80.00 seems to be the new price for one.

                            Bad for Postwar dealers,TERRIFIC for postwar collectors!!!!!But I could not agree with you more about the prices dropping. Happy Railroading-Kenny Baughman

                             
                          • Mike
                            Boy don t I know.  Been trying to sell my post war 726 and cars No bitters Mike H. Michael Pierce On Tuesday, June 3, 2014 9:44 PM, Tony mrv94@cfl.rr.com
                            Message 13 of 18 , Jun 3, 2014
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                              Boy don't I know.  Been trying to sell my post war 726 and cars
                              No bitters
                              Mike
                               
                              H. Michael Pierce


                              On Tuesday, June 3, 2014 9:44 PM, "'Tony' mrv94@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                               
                              I have to agree with the sad truth.. Postwar just isn't bringing any money .. I tried selling box cars I bought for between $30 and $40 for $10 and they are not moving .. It's very sad..  You can put me in your retiring group.  I just turned 60 and I retire and downsize my home .. Now I only have a spare bedroom for trains .. Not near enough room to have a nice layout and storage for a big collection .. I'm trying to thin the herd and it's not going well ..
                               
                              I guess like everyone else .. The older ones are not buying anymore and the younger ones aren't interested in the postwar .. Again I think this true with all collectibles
                              IMHO  -  
                               
                               
                               
                               
                              -------Original Message-------
                               
                              Date: 6/3/2014 12:26:49 AM
                              Subject: RE: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market
                               
                               
                              It is not the DCC craze that drives it. It is demographics!  The boomers that have a childhood connection to the postwar trains are aging and the younger generations do not have an emotional connection to the Postwar stuff.  If you research the TCA records the number of collector/operators of toy trains has fallen off the map.  The numbers of collectors, born after 1980 in the TCA, number about 150. This is out of about 28,000 total members in the TCA. Your Postwar items will soon be doorstops.
                               
                              I have bought more trains locally thru Craig’s List in the last 6 months then I have in the last 6 years. Every one of the buys has the same basic story. The seller is between 65 and 80, they are downsizing, the kids nor the grandkids want the trains so they have to go.
                              From: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com]
                              Sent: Monday, June 2, 2014 7:50 PM
                              To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market
                               
                               
                               
                               
                              Hello,I agree that postwar prices are dropping to prices I've never seen since I started back in the hobby 13 years ago.I thought it was just me,but it is happening right before our eyes. My best guess on this is that everyone is going into Legacy and Command Control,and selling their now called"Conventional" engines to help pay the outragegous prices for the new engines.
                               
                              And While this is good for the economy,and the hobby in general,postwar is dropping very QUICKLY.Once coveted items are being sold for a fraction of what they used to command,and the DCC craze is the only reason I can think of that these guys are unloading most of their postwar collections. 
                               
                              I love it,because I am just starting to build my modest collection,and am going to be able to acquire some PRIMO stuff that just not so long ago,was not in my budget.
                              A PRIMO #681 used to bring $150.00 all day long,but with what's going on,$80.00 seems to be the new price for one.
                              Bad for Postwar dealers,TERRIFIC for postwar collectors!!!!!But I could not agree with you more about the prices dropping. Happy Railroading-Kenny Baughman
                               


                            • Toni & Brian
                              What kind of price were you asking for your 726 and cars? What are the cars? Which 726? 46, 47,48, 49, or 52? From: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                              Message 14 of 18 , Jun 3, 2014
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                                What kind of price were you asking for your 726 and cars? What are the cars? Which 726? 46, 47,48, 49, or 52?

                                 

                                From: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com]
                                Sent: Tuesday, June 3, 2014 6:54 PM
                                To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market

                                 

                                 

                                Boy don't I know.  Been trying to sell my post war 726 and cars

                                No bitters

                                Mike

                                 

                                H. Michael Pierce

                                 

                                On Tuesday, June 3, 2014 9:44 PM, "'Tony' mrv94@... [Lionel_PostwarTrains]" <Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                 

                                 

                                I have to agree with the sad truth.. Postwar just isn't bringing any money .. I tried selling box cars I bought for between $30 and $40 for $10 and they are not moving .. It's very sad..  You can put me in your retiring group.  I just turned 60 and I retire and downsize my home .. Now I only have a spare bedroom for trains .. Not near enough room to have a nice layout and storage for a big collection .. I'm trying to thin the herd and it's not going well ..

                                 

                                I guess like everyone else .. The older ones are not buying anymore and the younger ones aren't interested in the postwar .. Again I think this true with all collectibles

                                IMHO  -  

                                 

                                 

                                 

                                 

                                -------Original Message-------

                                 

                                Date: 6/3/2014 12:26:49 AM

                                Subject: RE: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market

                                 

                                 

                                It is not the DCC craze that drives it. It is demographics!  The boomers that have a childhood connection to the postwar trains are aging and the younger generations do not have an emotional connection to the Postwar stuff.  If you research the TCA records the number of collector/operators of toy trains has fallen off the map.  The numbers of collectors, born after 1980 in the TCA, number about 150. This is out of about 28,000 total members in the TCA. Your Postwar items will soon be doorstops.

                                 

                                I have bought more trains locally thru Craig’s List in the last 6 months then I have in the last 6 years. Every one of the buys has the same basic story. The seller is between 65 and 80, they are downsizing, the kids nor the grandkids want the trains so they have to go.

                                 

                                From: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com]
                                Sent: Monday, June 2, 2014 7:50 PM
                                To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] 671 seen at local flea market

                                 

                                 

                                 

                                 

                                Hello,I agree that postwar prices are dropping to prices I've never seen since I started back in the hobby 13 years ago.I thought it was just me,but it is happening right before our eyes. My best guess on this is that everyone is going into Legacy and Command Control,and selling their now called"Conventional" engines to help pay the outragegous prices for the new engines.

                                 

                                And While this is good for the economy,and the hobby in general,postwar is dropping very QUICKLY.Once coveted items are being sold for a fraction of what they used to command,and the DCC craze is the only reason I can think of that these guys are unloading most of their postwar collections. 

                                 

                                I love it,because I am just starting to build my modest collection,and am going to be able to acquire some PRIMO stuff that just not so long ago,was not in my budget.

                                A PRIMO #681 used to bring $150.00 all day long,but with what's going on,$80.00 seems to be the new price for one.

                                Bad for Postwar dealers,TERRIFIC for postwar collectors!!!!!But I could not agree with you more about the prices dropping. Happy Railroading-Kenny Baughman

                                 

                                 

                              • n9aep
                                My experience selling postwar tells me that the price is much lower after January and falls through summer. I tend to buy in Spring and Summer and sell in
                                Message 15 of 18 , Jun 4, 2014
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                                  My experience selling postwar tells me that the price is much lower after January and falls through summer.  I tend to buy in Spring and Summer and sell in Fall and Winter.  I have seen prices move as much as 100% between seasons.  I agree that right now, prices are very low.  I also agree postwar items are not moving well. I see a lot of lower quality postwar now that I did not see a few years ago.  If your items are in very good to excellent shape, they will sell best in the window between late September and early December.  If your battered and broken items are not selling, I suggest getting them repaired and cleaned up so they are in much better shape.
                                • land46lord
                                  Greetings, I have been collecting Lionel Trains continuously all my life. I see a lot of comments about the price levels of 1996 on, but almost no comment
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Jun 4, 2014
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                                    Greetings,
                                     
                                    I have been collecting Lionel Trains continuously all my life.  
                                     
                                    I see a lot of comments about the price levels of 1996 on, but almost no comment about the rapid escalation of prices immediately prior to that period.  I have met quite a few people over the years that were interested in Lionel trains only because of the financial viewpoint.  They were more interested in what someone paid (or could get) for a particular item, than the engineering, production variation, operational aspects, decoration, or appearance in the Lionel line.  Many of these same people had speculated in baseball cards,  Matchbox cars, Wild Turkey Decanters, etc.  The activities of the hoarders hoping to make a profit at resale was I.M.H.O. one of the driving forces in that unsustainable rise in prices.
                                     
                                    Other hobby areas (like the ones just mentioned) have also experienced a rise and bust in value, partially due to changing population, but also weeding out the profit speculators.
                                     
                                    I known that I will not recover equal for anything I purchased in the normal market during that period, but in many cases, prices still have not yet sunk to what I paid prior to that time.
                                     
                                    For many reasons, these hoarders/speculators are now going bust and we are seeing the price sink back to reasonable levels.  Take a general look (not just a few specific exceptional items) at the Greenberg guides(or equivalent) of 1978, then late 1980's, then mid 1990's, then mid 2000's and then now.  Where the identity remains the same(no new discovered variations, etc.), the 1978 guide is more often than not a more accurate price guide than the mid 2000 guide to current values for many items. 
                                     
                                    For those of us who operate, and actually enjoy viewing and running our collections, this is an excellent time to upgrade by replacement of existing items in our collections with better examples.
                                     
                                    Now, I will dive for cover as the knives fly!


                                    Louie B. Hydrick
                                    Associate Broker
                                    RE/MAX Partners
                                    4316 Washington Rd.
                                    Evans GA 30809-3957

                                    706-922-7355 office
                                    706-922-7368 direct office
                                    706-922-7356 fax
                                    706-832-6263 cell

                                    Or visit me on the web at:
                                    www.csrahomesandland.com
                                    or http://www.louiebhydrick.remax-georgia.com/
                                  • Toni & Brian
                                    The rapid escalation of prices 25-30 years ago was supply and demand. Limited supply and a growing number of 30ish boomers, with young children, wanting to buy
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Jun 4, 2014
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                                      The rapid escalation of prices 25-30 years ago was supply and demand. Limited supply and a growing number of 30ish boomers, with young children, wanting to buy the childhood they didn’t have. 

                                       

                                      That brings up the why an eye on values is important. When the collection exceeds 3000 pieces you have to keep an eye on the monies.  In the 60’s when Lionel trains were just used model railroad equipment the values really didn’t matter. I can remember in the early 70’s, when I was a kid, a nice  F3 set could be had for $50. Less than a new MPC engine.  Even in inflation adjusted dollars it was a relatively reasonable amount of money. But as demand increased and all of a sudden those same engines were headed toward $1000, or many thousands in some cases, the money became Important. It  is hard to justify spending that kind of money without an “out”.  

                                       

                                      The guys who got in early, when it was cheap, have had a good ride up and will not get hurt on the ride down.  The smart ones have sold at top, or near top dollar, and did well.  Somehow they were able to separate themselves from the trains, a hard thing to do, one that I just can’t seem to accomplish.  The guys who bought at the top will have a “firm grip” on their stuff.

                                       

                                      I still buy a lot of trains and I run into a lot of the guys who paid big dollars for their stuff. These  guys sneer (read are really teed off) at me when I offer them a small percentage of what they think their stuff is worth.  I now buy based on future values, not what it is worth today. I have a firm understanding of where prices are going and I don’t panic. If the seller won’t sell at a price I am comfortable with I just wait as there will be others to buy. I also remind the “I can’t take a loss crowd” that their heirs are not so emotionally attached and will want to free up the cash. I am young and can wait.

                                       

                                      I have bought more trains from Craig’s list in the last 6 months then I have in the last 6 years. 80% of the trains I look at are not in the hands of collectors and the sellers are very reasonable. They are downsizing and the kids and grandkids want nothing to do with the trains.

                                       

                                      The upside is that I should be able to buy items for my collection that have become to scarce or expensive over the last 30 years. With less demand they will be easier to find and affordable. There is a silver lining!

                                       

                                      From: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com]
                                      Sent: Wednesday, June 4, 2014 5:32 AM
                                      To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] Re: 671 seen at local flea market

                                       

                                       

                                      Greetings,

                                       

                                      I have been collecting Lionel Trains continuously all my life.  

                                       

                                      I see a lot of comments about the price levels of 1996 on, but almost no comment about the rapid escalation of prices immediately prior to that period.  I have met quite a few people over the years that were interested in Lionel trains only because of the financial viewpoint.  They were more interested in what someone paid (or could get) for a particular item, than the engineering, production variation, operational aspects, decoration, or appearance in the Lionel line.  Many of these same people had speculated in baseball cards,  Matchbox cars, Wild Turkey Decanters, etc.  The activities of the hoarders hoping to make a profit at resale was I.M.H.O. one of the driving forces in that unsustainable rise in prices.

                                       

                                      Other hobby areas (like the ones just mentioned) have also experienced a rise and bust in value, partially due to changing population, but also weeding out the profit speculators.

                                       

                                      I known that I will not recover equal for anything I purchased in the normal market during that period, but in many cases, prices still have not yet sunk to what I paid prior to that time.

                                       

                                      For many reasons, these hoarders/speculators are now going bust and we are seeing the price sink back to reasonable levels.  Take a general look (not just a few specific exceptional items) at the Greenberg guides(or equivalent) of 1978, then late 1980's, then mid 1990's, then mid 2000's and then now.  Where the identity remains the same(no new discovered variations, etc.), the 1978 guide is more often than not a more accurate price guide than the mid 2000 guide to current values for many items. 

                                       

                                      For those of us who operate, and actually enjoy viewing and running our collections, this is an excellent time to upgrade by replacement of existing items in our collections with better examples.

                                       

                                      Now, I will dive for cover as the knives fly!



                                      Louie B. Hydrick
                                      Associate Broker
                                      RE/MAX Partners
                                      4316 Washington Rd.
                                      Evans GA 30809-3957

                                      706-922-7355 office
                                      706-922-7368 direct office
                                      706-922-7356 fax
                                      706-832-6263 cell

                                      Or visit me on the web at:
                                      www.csrahomesandland.com
                                      or http://www.louiebhydrick.remax-georgia.com/

                                    • Toni & Brian
                                      Another thought for those of you who are dollar conscious. Sell now! The prices are down but not as down as they will be in the future. Any Hot Wheels guys
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Jun 4, 2014
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                                        Another thought for those of you who are dollar conscious. Sell now! The prices are down but not as down as they will be in the future.    Any Hot Wheels guys out there?  Sell now as it has reached is apex in the demographics game.

                                         

                                        From: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com]
                                        Sent: Wednesday, June 4, 2014 5:32 AM
                                        To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                                        Subject: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] Re: 671 seen at local flea market

                                         

                                         

                                        Greetings,

                                         

                                        I have been collecting Lionel Trains continuously all my life.  

                                         

                                        I see a lot of comments about the price levels of 1996 on, but almost no comment about the rapid escalation of prices immediately prior to that period.  I have met quite a few people over the years that were interested in Lionel trains only because of the financial viewpoint.  They were more interested in what someone paid (or could get) for a particular item, than the engineering, production variation, operational aspects, decoration, or appearance in the Lionel line.  Many of these same people had speculated in baseball cards,  Matchbox cars, Wild Turkey Decanters, etc.  The activities of the hoarders hoping to make a profit at resale was I.M.H.O. one of the driving forces in that unsustainable rise in prices.

                                         

                                        Other hobby areas (like the ones just mentioned) have also experienced a rise and bust in value, partially due to changing population, but also weeding out the profit speculators.

                                         

                                        I known that I will not recover equal for anything I purchased in the normal market during that period, but in many cases, prices still have not yet sunk to what I paid prior to that time.

                                         

                                        For many reasons, these hoarders/speculators are now going bust and we are seeing the price sink back to reasonable levels.  Take a general look (not just a few specific exceptional items) at the Greenberg guides(or equivalent) of 1978, then late 1980's, then mid 1990's, then mid 2000's and then now.  Where the identity remains the same(no new discovered variations, etc.), the 1978 guide is more often than not a more accurate price guide than the mid 2000 guide to current values for many items. 

                                         

                                        For those of us who operate, and actually enjoy viewing and running our collections, this is an excellent time to upgrade by replacement of existing items in our collections with better examples.

                                         

                                        Now, I will dive for cover as the knives fly!



                                        Louie B. Hydrick
                                        Associate Broker
                                        RE/MAX Partners
                                        4316 Washington Rd.
                                        Evans GA 30809-3957

                                        706-922-7355 office
                                        706-922-7368 direct office
                                        706-922-7356 fax
                                        706-832-6263 cell

                                        Or visit me on the web at:
                                        www.csrahomesandland.com
                                        or http://www.louiebhydrick.remax-georgia.com/

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