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Smoke?

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  • William Manley
    I m a newbie with several steamers but little smoke. I got the locos on ebay none have instructions. I only put in 3 or 4 drops of liquid smoke and get very
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 14, 2014
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      I'm a newbie with several steamers but little smoke. I got the locos on ebay none have instructions. I only put in 3 or 4 drops of liquid smoke and get very little smoke pouring out. You have to look very carefully to see small white wiffs. What am I doing wrong or are wiffs what you're supposed to get. How can you tell if they use liquid or pellets?

      Bill Manley
    • miked_smith@bellsouth.net
      What engine numbers do you have? If they are postwar engines they may need pellets instead of fluid, There are conversion kits to convert pot war smoke units
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 14, 2014
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        What engine numbers do you have?  If they are postwar engines they may need pellets instead of fluid,  There are conversion kits to convert pot war smoke units to fluid.  Fluid in the right type of smoke unit usually produces more smoke.  Pellet type unit do well when cleaned but tend to slow as they become dirty especially if you add pellets too often.
      • Thomas McLean
        Most postwar steamers will work well with liquid smoke. What does happen though over time with a smoke pellet unit is that they clog. There is a small hole in
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 14, 2014
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          Most postwar steamers will work well with liquid smoke. What does happen though over time with a smoke pellet unit is that they clog. There is a small hole in the smoke unit that directs air from the piston movement that causes the puffing action. Often this hole clogs or  the piston itself becomes stuck in its bore and no longer moves. Sometimes if you place the train in e unit neutral and turn up the voltage, it is possible to remelt the clogs and restore operation. This is a sever procedure as it really heats up the nichrome. The best solution is to disassemble and clean the smoke unit. At that point you could convert to a liquid smoke element but I have found that the pellet unit works fine with liquid smoke fluid-TM

           
          Thomas M. McLean
           
           


          On Friday, February 14, 2014 9:06 AM, "miked_smith@..." <miked_smith@...> wrote:
           
          What engine numbers do you have?  If they are postwar engines they may need pellets instead of fluid,  There are conversion kits to convert pot war smoke units to fluid.  Fluid in the right type of smoke unit usually produces more smoke.  Pellet type unit do well when cleaned but tend to slow as they become dirty especially if you add pellets too often.


        • Joe Francis
          IMHO (take it for what it s worth), trying to resurrect a wispy OEM smoke unit is a waste of time, UNLESS the locomotive in question is in collectible (Mint
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 15, 2014
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            RE: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] RE: Smoke?

            IMHO (take it for what it's worth), trying to resurrect a wispy OEM smoke unit is a waste of time, UNLESS the locomotive in question is in "collectible" (Mint or Like New) condition. If it's a runner, then give it a worthy smoke unit, i.e., a liquid smoke conversion! The smoke output is FANTASTIC, can be a variety of smells (from good ol' Lionel to peppermint candy to <gasp> American Flyer), and won't break the bank (the last ones I bought several years ago set me back $5 apiece; I don't think they've gone up much since).

            One thing I did do was to replace the plastic top cover on the liquid unit with the metal top cover from the original unit. You have to make sure one of the wires passing through the hole on the top is insulated (a little shrink wrap takes care of that), but other than that it's a snap. The reason for the modification is because the unit generates a LOT of heat, enough (I found) to melt the plastic cover. Not good :-/

            --
            Joseph Francis
            Wauwatosa, WI
            jfrancis4@...

          • kennybaughman
            Hello,One thing you can try is to just run the bejeezers out of the engines,with a lot of cars on them,so you can really crank up the voltage on the
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 17, 2014
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              Hello,One thing you can try is to just run the bejeezers out of the engines,with a lot of cars on them,so you can really crank up the voltage on the transformer.As Tom said,these smoke units  are usually clogged up,and if the smoke unit is working,it will get better with time.


              Another option is to hold the loco just off the track,where it is still running,but barely making contact.Crank up the transformer,and just let it run at full tilt while holding it,and this basically does the same thing I previously stated,but you don't have to hookup a long line of cars.


              And if you can learn how to do it,you can take off the shell,pop the cap of the smoke unit off,and carefully clean all of that old smoke pellet residue out of there,making sure that that hole is open as Ton stated.If all else fails,you can buy a complete smoke unit for about $25.00,and solder the one wire to the "hot" terminal of the e-unit,where the old one was connected to.

              You can also rebuild the old one, just buy the heating element,there are two kinds,one for the pellets and one for smoke fluid only.Pop off the cap,clean the old smoke pellets out of there,install new wadding,put the new unit in,and make sure to replace the felt gasket on top,as the engine will short out if the shell touches the smoke unit,without this insulation on it.If you decide to rebuild one,feel free to contact me if you run into any problems,and I'll be glad to walk you through it.

              But first try to see if just running the daylights out of it works first.I am not a fan of smoke fluid,to me the pellets make the whole Lionel experience complete.The smell is one of a kind!!!Hope this helps-Kenny Baughman



              ---In Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com, <wkmanley@...> wrote:

              I'm a newbie with several steamers but little smoke. I got the locos on ebay none have instructions. I only put in 3 or 4 drops of liquid smoke and get very little smoke pouring out. You have to look very carefully to see small white wiffs. What am I doing wrong or are wiffs what you're supposed to get. How can you tell if they use liquid or pellets?

              Bill Manley
            • Luther Stanton
              Is there a modern day replacement for what Lionel I believe called electrical cement used to seal the top of the original smoke unit?   I like my work to
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 17, 2014
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                Is there a "modern day" replacement for what Lionel I believe called "electrical cement" used to seal the top of the original smoke unit?  

                I like my work to be as close to factory (in appearance and function) as possible when done so I would like to get that look after rebuilding the unit.

                - Luther


                From: "kennybaughman@..." <kennybaughman@...>
                To: Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, February 17, 2014 8:49 AM
                Subject: [Lionel_PostwarTrains] RE: Smoke?

                 
                Hello,One thing you can try is to just run the bejeezers out of the engines,with a lot of cars on them,so you can really crank up the voltage on the transformer.As Tom said,these smoke units  are usually clogged up,and if the smoke unit is working,it will get better with time.

                Another option is to hold the loco just off the track,where it is still running,but barely making contact.Crank up the transformer,and just let it run at full tilt while holding it,and this basically does the same thing I previously stated,but you don't have to hookup a long line of cars.

                And if you can learn how to do it,you can take off the shell,pop the cap of the smoke unit off,and carefully clean all of that old smoke pellet residue out of there,making sure that that hole is open as Ton stated.If all else fails,you can buy a complete smoke unit for about $25.00,and solder the one wire to the "hot" terminal of the e-unit,where the old one was connected to.
                You can also rebuild the old one, just buy the heating element,there are two kinds,one for the pellets and one for smoke fluid only.Pop off the cap,clean the old smoke pellets out of there,install new wadding,put the new unit in,and make sure to replace the felt gasket on top,as the engine will short out if the shell touches the smoke unit,without this insulation on it.If you decide to rebuild one,feel free to contact me if you run into any problems,and I'll be glad to walk you through it.
                But first try to see if just running the daylights out of it works first.I am not a fan of smoke fluid,to me the pellets make the whole Lionel experience complete.The smell is one of a kind!!!Hope this helps-Kenny Baughman


                ---In Lionel_PostwarTrains@yahoogroups.com, <wkmanley@...> wrote:

                I'm a newbie with several steamers but little smoke. I got the locos on ebay none have instructions. I only put in 3 or 4 drops of liquid smoke and get very little smoke pouring out. You have to look very carefully to see small white wiffs. What am I doing wrong or are wiffs what you're supposed to get. How can you tell if they use liquid or pellets?

                Bill Manley


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