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newbie asks: ext3 vs. ntfs/openlink vs. stock firmware/ gigabit vs. ethernet/

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  • robertdotnagle
    I m close to buying a 250 gig linkstation. I have some newbie questions. I have a home/small office backing up files of various sizes. I have a Windows
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 19, 2006
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      I'm close to buying a 250 gig linkstation. I have some newbie questions.

      I have a home/small office backing up files of various sizes. I have a
      Windows desktop, and a dual boot laptop (with FC 5) and a Lacie 160
      USB drive. It's quite conceivable that i will store large unprocessed
      video files (possibly larger than the 4 gig limit for FAT32). I might
      be editing high def video on my desktop, and occasionally would like
      to manipulate larger files and preview them on my Avel linkplayer DVD
      player (either by connecting the usb drive directly or This is not
      absolutely essential.

      My main goal is using linkstation to run backup programs/scripts, so
      things that normally reside on my desktop/PC's would reside elsewhere.
      As a wildcard, I have a Avel linkplayer which conceivably has some
      ability to play media files via ethernet from a
      windows desktop and possibly an ethernet-enabled device. It would be
      REALLY nice if I could figure out how to
      get linkplayer and linkstation to communicate, though I would call
      this a bonus rather than an indispensable feature.

      Here's my questions:
      a)if linkstation drive's file system is ext3, then will windows PC
      have any problems backing up ntfs to the ext 3 filesystem?
      b)I really can't figure out whether stock firmware or openlink is my
      best option.
      c)do I need to wipe clean the usb drive before connecting? If so, does
      that mean it behaves like a journaled file system than whatever file
      system the usb drive was intended for (fat 32).
      d) For openlink, how have the extra command line tools helped people
      (for those not running a web server, for instance). For instance, if
      I am running rsync or ssh from my linux laptop and writing to/from
      this drive, why would I need my NAS to have a command line interface
      anyway? As long as I mount the drive from my linux laptop, can't I
      essentially run the same commands from the laptop?
      e)on neweggg I have a choice between two buffalo 250 gig drives.
      Gigabit ethernet for $25 extra. Are modems or routers these days
      equipped with gigabit support these days? (I don't recall seeing this).
      f)have anyone noticed issues burning CDs or dvds from files on the
      network drive?


      rj
    • robertdotnagle
      I m pleasantly surprised that for the Avel Linkstation, the FAT32 file limitation applies only when you hook up to usb interface. If you hook it up via the
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 19, 2006
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        I'm pleasantly surprised that for the Avel Linkstation, the FAT32 file
        limitation applies only when you hook up to usb interface.

        If you hook it up via the ethernet port, apparently it can read NTFS
        and ext2.

        http://www.iodata.com/usa/forum/showthread.php?t=1315

        So if linkstation has ext3 files which are served via samba, wouldn't
        that be good enough? Does anyone want to rain on my parade?

        If I could get it to work, it would be really cool.

        rj
      • risimmonsuk
        ... Twonkyvision media server apparently supports avel Linkplayer (www.twonkyvision.com). This comes with pre-compiled binaries for either MIPS or PowerPC
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 20, 2006
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          --- In LinkStation_General@yahoogroups.com, "robertdotnagle"
          <idiotprogrammer@...> wrote:
          >
          > I'm pleasantly surprised that for the Avel Linkstation, the FAT32 file
          > limitation applies only when you hook up to usb interface.
          >
          > If you hook it up via the ethernet port, apparently it can read NTFS
          > and ext2.
          >
          > http://www.iodata.com/usa/forum/showthread.php?t=1315
          >
          > So if linkstation has ext3 files which are served via samba, wouldn't
          > that be good enough? Does anyone want to rain on my parade?
          >
          > If I could get it to work, it would be really cool.
          >
          > rj
          >

          Twonkyvision media server apparently supports avel Linkplayer
          (www.twonkyvision.com). This comes with pre-compiled binaries for
          either MIPS or PowerPC processor Linkstations. To install this you'd
          need OpenLink to get root access. It's not free, but it's pretty
          cheap, and it seems to do the trick (I use it to serve music to my
          Soundbridge).

          Can't really help with your other questions i'm afraid!
        • KeepIt SimpleStupid
          ... wrote: ... It s not essential that a modem or router be equipped with a gigabit port, but if you want to utilize gigabit speeds the rest of
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 20, 2006
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            --- robertdotnagle <idiotprogrammer@...>
            wrote:

            <snip>
            > e)on neweggg I have a choice between two buffalo 250
            > gig drives.
            > Gigabit ethernet for $25 extra. Are modems or
            > routers these days
            > equipped with gigabit support these days? (I don't
            > recall seeing this).
            <snip>

            It's not essential that a modem or router be equipped
            with a gigabit port, but if you want to utilize
            gigabit speeds the rest of your network needs to be
            gigabit "certified". Meaning cabeling is much more
            stringent.

            The modem/router would be plugged into the uplink port
            (10/100/1000) on a gigabit hub/switch and would be
            essentially a low-speed device. All LAN traffic could
            be gigabit.

            Be careful with any selection because you can get
            gigabit only switches or 10/100/1000 or just gigabit
            uplink ports with 10/100 normal ports which is the
            most common configuration.

            <snip>

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          • robertdotnagle
            wow, i just had a lightbulb moment after reading these replies. What you re saying is that you ll be able to see the network media software interface on your
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 20, 2006
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              wow, i just had a lightbulb moment after reading these replies. What
              you're saying is that you'll be able to see the network media
              software interface on your TV (if you have iodata linkplayer). I never
              realized that. That is cool and definitely a reason to consider going
              with the open firmware. Also, having more than one network media
              player gives me some flexibility. (this might even be a reason to
              upgrade to the 300 gigs).

              i worry about installation issues though. I don't want the advantages
              of having a network media station to overshadow my main need to run a
              backup storage solution.

              Some other questions:

              a) paths. generally are there any rules/conventions for where you keep
              your backup files and where you keep your media files? I see in
              swissplayer you are able to hardcode paths
              http://www.swisscenter.co.uk/images/gallery/config/config_02.png

              b)when I connect an external usb hard drive to linkstation, how does
              this show up in the file system? Are there lots of latency issues with
              a usb external drive (the buffalo linkplayer manual suggests that usb
              external drives are mainly backups for the main nas. Is that true?)

              c)here's a dumb question about media hardware (in my case the
              Linkplayer DVD player). My remote control for it has a lot of
              buttons, but it can't really function as a keyboard. (there are number
              buttons which double as alphabet buttons too apparently). Do the
              software interfaces for network media players just involve a lot of
              buttons (Play, Resume, Exit, etc), or are there lots of occasions
              where you need to be able to type more complicated things like words?

              d)just out of curiousity, has anyone tried running mythtv, freevo or
              other things on linkstation?

              rj

              rj
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