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Re: [LinkStation_General] Webmin on Linkstation ?

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  • Wilson
    ... For this one, it doesn t work with the LS. It can go to the EM mode, but have no telnet access like the kurobox. You can do nothing in the EM mode beside
    Message 1 of 22 , Dec 8, 2004
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      > My other idea was to boot into the
      > emergency/diagnostic OS that happens when you don't
      > have an OS on the hard drive and somehow manage to
      > get
      > another Linux set up from there, but this seems
      > harder
      > and has no real advantage other than you get to
      > claim
      > back the small amount of disk space on partition 1
      > reserved for the original OS.
      >

      For this one, it doesn't work with the LS. It can go
      to the EM mode, but have no telnet access like the
      kurobox. You can do nothing in the EM mode beside
      using the LS firmware updater to flash a firmware on
      it (in that mode, it'll report your old firmware as
      nothing..

      As if we can have telnet access on LS in EM mode, we
      can do a lot of things like make our own partition and
      FS and else..For now, there's nothing we can do until
      someone can hack in to the flash..but by that time,
      it'll be too risky that I don't want to try it unless
      it's been 100% working and proved by many ppl.

      I'm fine with the current OS as I just chroot to
      compile more useful software that I need and have
      those symbolic links from the root. But well,
      customizing the kernel will be great...we actually may
      not need to recompile the kernel..just need to put all
      the compiled modules into proper places and have the
      modutil binaries to install the modules with the stock
      LS kernel. That will be great..if the kernel is the
      same as the kurobox, it may be worth to try to get
      some modules from the kurobox kernel and load it up.

      just my 2 cents.

      W



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    • James Stewart
      ... Anyone want to risk to see if the kurobox OS (especially the parts that live in the flash regions) will install and run on a LinkStation? ... But there
      Message 2 of 22 , Dec 8, 2004
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        --- Wilson <sonsondei@...> wrote:

        > > [Using EM mode to install a custom OS]
        >
        > For this one, it doesn't work with the LS. It can
        > go to the EM mode, but have no telnet access like
        > the kurobox.

        Anyone want to risk to see if the kurobox OS
        (especially the parts that live in the flash regions)
        will install and run on a LinkStation?

        > You can do nothing in the EM mode beside
        > using the LS firmware updater to flash a firmware
        > on it ...

        But there might be work-arounds. Maybe you could fool
        the firmware upgrader into thinking it is installing a
        factory update, when in fact it installs your OS
        instead. I even wondered if the whole thing just ran
        on bootp/tftp protocols anyway.

        > As if we can have telnet access on LS in EM mode,
        > we can do a lot of things like make our own
        > partition and FS and else..For now, there's nothing
        > we can do until someone can hack in to the
        > flash..but by that time, it'll be too risky that I
        > don't want to try it unless it's been 100% working
        > and proved by many ppl.

        We are on the same page here. Having all this locked
        away in flash with no way to recover from a failed
        boot is too risky for me too. There were some people
        on the Revgear forums that thought they had access to
        the hardware tools to recover from this stuff and
        perhaps the smarts to write a bootloader that we can
        all live with. I guess I need to check in over there
        and see if any progress has been made in that
        direction.

        > I'm fine with the current OS as I just chroot to
        > compile more useful software that I need and have
        > those symbolic links from the root.

        Yes, that is basically how I currently run my Debian.
        It works amazingly well.

        > But well, customizing the kernel will be great...we
        > actually may not need to recompile the kernel..just
        > need to put all the compiled modules into proper
        > places and have the modutil binaries to install
        > the modules with the stock LS kernel. That will be
        > great..if the kernel is the same as the kurobox, it
        > may be worth to try to get some modules from the
        > kurobox kernel and load it up.

        I did try this and got a "version mismatch" error.
        The kernels are compiled with different suffexes.
        Granted this is just a label, but then that also says
        that they could be much different kernels. I suspect
        that the Linkstation kernel was not compiled with the
        "hooks" to take the modules that the Kurobox provides.

        My dream here is to compile and install a kernel that
        has support (via modules) for everything you might
        want to plug into a USB port, any file systems, and
        any common network options so you can use things like
        other network interfaces, USB sound cards, CD/DVD
        burners, serial/parellel adapters, more printers,
        cameras, drive arrays, keyboards, mice & USB video
        etc. with the Linkstation if you so desire.





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      • Wilson
        ... This is my dream too...having it connected to a USB hub, put USB serial console to see and manage the thing offline, put USB card reader to read different
        Message 3 of 22 , Dec 8, 2004
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          > My dream here is to compile and install a kernel
          > that
          > has support (via modules) for everything you might
          > want to plug into a USB port, any file systems, and
          > any common network options so you can use things
          > like
          > other network interfaces, USB sound cards, CD/DVD
          > burners, serial/parellel adapters, more printers,
          > cameras, drive arrays, keyboards, mice & USB video
          > etc. with the Linkstation if you so desire.


          This is my dream too...having it connected to a USB
          hub, put USB serial console to see and manage the
          thing offline, put USB card reader to read different
          medias and share to web right away, put a fat32 USB
          disk or flash for friends to come and download files
          right away and they can use in MS windows...put USB
          network adapter to set up firewall and routing...

          My LS is bought mainly for playing and development..I
          don't mind to boot and clean up the parition and try
          again and again..since I have other servers to store
          my actual data. But my first project is to understand
          the things and scripts in /www to customize a better
          web admin tool for my elder brother who I first bought
          the LS120 for his company to use in HK, that's how I
          know this product and why I bought mine and compiled
          the samba 3.x for him to use chinese filename via
          WinXP.

          After it, I'll begin to work on the kernel (maybe)
          since hacking the actual flash is too risky and may
          not be recoverable if anything happens.


          W



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        • Wilson
          http://linkstation.yi.org/index.php?Kernel_source From the link above, you can download the kernel source for linkstation and it has doucmentation on how to
          Message 4 of 22 , Dec 8, 2004
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            http://linkstation.yi.org/index.php?Kernel_source

            From the link above, you can download the kernel
            source for linkstation and it has doucmentation on how
            to compile and install it, also how to update the
            flash to boot the new kernel. But they're all in
            japanese...if one knows japanese in this group and
            able to translate it properly, it'll be so great.

            W



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          • C. Scott Ananian
            The quickest way to get real applications running on your linkstation is to install Debian on it. That will get you a compact but fully-functioning system,
            Message 5 of 22 , Dec 9, 2004
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              The quickest way to get 'real' applications running on your linkstation is
              to install Debian on it. That will get you a compact but
              fully-functioning system, and installing new applications is very easy.
              If you want, you can install a GUI and everything.

              James Stewart has talked about this option before; here's an
              (abbreviated) account of how I did it. Perhaps someone with more time
              could flesh this out into a proper guide.
              ------------
              1. Get root on the LinkStation. Create a share using the standard
              web interface; let's call it 'Linux'. We're
              going to create a slightly-expanded version of the basic
              LinkStation install in 'Linux' (you could perform these
              modifications directly to the linkstation root filesystem, but
              I prefer to leave that as close to 'stock' as possible).
              We'll use the bootstrap to install a 'proper' copy of Debian
              in a 'Debian' subdirectory of the 'Linux' share.

              As root:
              # ls /mnt
              You should see your 'Linux' directories.

              # tar cl / | tar -C /mnt/Linux -xv
              This will transfer the standard linkstation filesystem to 'Linux'.

              2. Download 'binary.zip' from http://kurobox.com/downloads
              Unzip it on your local computer and move the tar.gz files from
              inside it to the linkstation. Easiest way to do that is to move
              them to the linkstation's 'share' folder. Unpack these; for each
              file.tar.gz, do
              # tar -C /mnt/Linux -xf /mnt/share/file.tar.gz

              3. Install chroot; chroot into new root partition.
              The chroot binaries are in the 'Files' section of this group.
              Move chroot.tgz to the 'share' folder, and
              # tar -C /mnt/Linux/usr/sbin -xf /mnt/share/chroot.tgz
              Now move to your new bootstrap filesystem!
              # /mnt/Linux/usr/sbin/chroot /mnt/Linux /bin/bash

              4. Remount stuff inside chroot:
              # mount -t proc boot-proc /proc
              # mount /dev/ram0 /mnt2/ram
              # mount /dev/pts
              # mount /proc/bus/usb
              # mkdir -p /mnt/spool/tmp

              Now you've got a slightly-more functional unix system, with a compiler
              and other good stuff. If it only had 'wget' and 'zcat', it would be
              enough to install the debian bootstrap system...

              5. Install wget, and zcat (gzip).
              On an existing Debian system, do:
              $ apt-get source wget gzip debootstrap
              This will create folders 'wget-1.9.1', 'gzip-1.3.5', and 'debootstrap-0.2.45'.
              The version numbers might be slightly different for you, it shouldn't
              matter too much. But hang on a sec, we want the original gzip
              sources, not the patched Debian ones (or else we'll need to install
              automake on our bootstrap system, which we don't want to do):
              $ /bin/rm -rf gzip-1.3.5
              $ tar xzf gzip_1.3.5.orig.tar.gz
              Also download the debootstrap binary .deb for powerpc from:
              http://ftp.debian.org/debian/pool/main/d/debootstrap/debootstrap_0.2.45_powerpc.deb
              And extract the 'data.tar.gz' file from it:
              $ ar -xf debootstrap_0.2.45_powerpc.deb

              Tar these up:
              $ tar czf deboot_src.tgz debootstrap-0.2.45 data.tar.gz gzip-1.3.5 wget-1.9.1
              and move this to the 'share' folder.
              *** IF YOU DON'T HAVE ACCESS TO A DEBIAN SYSTEM, I'VE UPLOADED deboot_src.tgz
              *** TO THE GROUP 'FILES' SECTION FOR YOU.

              Now we're a little stuck here, because we can't actually see the
              'share' folder from our chroot-ed bootstrap system. Open a new window
              and log in as root again, then
              # mv /mnt/share/deboot_src.tgz /mnt/Linux/root
              Close that window and go back to your first one. As root:
              # cd /root/wget-1.9.1/
              # ./configure --prefix=/usr && make && make install
              # cd /root/gzip-1.3.5/
              # ./configure --prefix=/usr && make && make install

              6. Now we're going to compile debootstrap and ease into the
              instructions at
              http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/powerpc/ch-preparing.en.html#s-linux-upgrade
              We're at the tail end of section 3.7.2 at the moment:

              # tar -C / -xzf /root/data.tar.gz

              7. We're almost there, but the 'pkgdetails' file from the debootstrap
              .deb is broken (wrong library version), so let's fix it:

              # cd /root/debootstrap-0.2.45/
              # make pkgdetails
              # cd /usr/lib/debootstrap/
              # mv pkgdetails pkgdetails.OLD
              # mv /root/debootstrap-0.2.45/pkgdetails .

              8. Check to make sure there is something sensible in /etc/resolv.conf.
              If you've configured your LinkStation to use DHCP there might already be
              something sensible there. But if every line starts with a '#', then
              you need to set up a name server:
              # echo nameserver 128.30.67.10 >> /etc/resolv.conf

              That's a nameserver at MIT. It should work for you, even if it's not ideal.

              9. Check that your PATH includes /usr/sbin and /sbin:
              # echo $PATH
              If you don't see /usr/sbin in the results of that command, do
              # export PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/sbin:/sbin:$PATH
              In fact, it won't hurt to do the above command even if you *do*
              already have /sbin in your path.

              10. OK! Let's install Debian! This is section 3.7.3 of the Debian
              installation manual referenced above (you may also want to 'man
              debootstrap' on an existing debian system and refer to the example):

              # mkdir /Debian
              # /usr/sbin/debootstrap --arch powerpc woody /Debian http://http.us.debian.org/debian
              Now this is section 3.7.5:
              # cp /etc/hosts /Debian/etc/
              # cp /etc/fstab /Debian/etc/
              # mount -t proc chroot-proc /Debian/proc
              # chroot /Debian /bin/bash
              (You can skip 3.7.5.1-3.7.5.3)
              This is section 3.7.5.4:
              # /usr/sbin/base-config
              Refer to
              http://www.debian.org/releases/stable/powerpc/ch-init-config.en.html#s-base-config
              Although if I remember correction section 8.5, 8.6, 8.9, and 8.10 are skipped.
              You can skip 'Select and install packages' for now (although it
              doesn't hurt to try it if you like).
              Finish with 'finish configuring the base system'
              (You can skip sections 3.7.5.5, 3.7.6, 3.7.7, and 3.8 of the debian
              installation guide.)

              ----------
              TA-DA!
              You've got a functioning Debian system!

              # apt-get install ssh
              # /etc/init.d/ssh restart

              will start up ssh for you, and then you can log into the debian system
              directly. Installing new software is easy with apt-get. Use
              'apt-cache search' to find a package, for example:
              # apt-cache search bittorrent
              and 'apt-get install' to install it.
              # apt-get install bittorrent

              For example, I started by installing:

              # apt-get install emacs21-nox ipcheck bittorrent bittornado screen
              # apt-get install bzip2 lynx mime-support gcc xbase-clients apache2 libsasl2-modules ca-certificates

              Then I set NO_START to 0 in /etc/default/apache2 and changed '80' to
              '8008' (so as not to conflict with the built-in web server) in
              /etc/apache2/ports.conf. I also added
              'ServerName xxxxx.dyndns.org'
              to the <VirtualHost> section of /etc/apache2/sites-available/default
              (Editing these files using emacs).
              Then
              # /etc/init.d/apache2 restart
              started apache.

              Perhaps someone else can give a step-by-step to install vnc and a nice
              gui. It's not hard.
              -- C. Scott Ananian
              2004-12-09

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            • James Stewart
              This is great! I was previously trying to get debootstrap to work but kept running into problems with stuff missing, So I ended up downloading a small debian
              Message 6 of 22 , Dec 9, 2004
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                This is great! I was previously trying to get
                debootstrap to work but kept running into problems
                with stuff missing, So I ended up downloading a small
                debian distro from a Japanese site.

                That distro had a few modifications dealing with
                sending commands to the Atmel AVR processor to do
                things like control the LEDs (I think) and to power
                the thing off, and who know what else. Did you have
                to do anything like this to deal with any such issues?

                --- "C. Scott Ananian"
                <cananian@...> wrote:

                > The quickest way to get 'real' applications running
                > on your linkstation is to install Debian on it.
                > That will get you a compact but fully-functioning
                > system, and installing new applications is very
                > easy. If you want, you can install a GUI and
                > everything.
                >
                > Perhaps someone with more time
                > could flesh this out into a proper guide.

                I would love to do this. I guess I need to get my LS
                back up and running soon (even if I have to kludge in
                a different power supply).

                Here is a question about hardware specifics between
                PPC processors: The Debian distro was compiled for
                MacIntoshes which generally run a much more advanced
                and powerful PPC processor. Obviously these binaries
                seem to run on the '603 PPC that is in our
                LinkStations. My question is if there would be any
                significant advantage to using the source based Gentoo
                Linux (as a few others have done) and compiling
                perhaps more optimized code for our PPC other than
                running these binaries that were meant for vastly
                different hardware?



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              • C. Scott Ananian
                ... no, because i left the original installation running underneath. I just launch ssh and my own customizations in the debian chroot. ... The PowerPC family
                Message 7 of 22 , Dec 9, 2004
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                  On Thu, 9 Dec 2004, James Stewart wrote:

                  > That distro had a few modifications dealing with
                  > sending commands to the Atmel AVR processor to do
                  > things like control the LEDs (I think) and to power
                  > the thing off, and who know what else. Did you have
                  > to do anything like this to deal with any such issues?

                  no, because i left the original installation running underneath.
                  I just launch ssh and my own customizations in the debian chroot.

                  > Here is a question about hardware specifics between
                  > PPC processors: The Debian distro was compiled for
                  > MacIntoshes which generally run a much more advanced
                  > and powerful PPC processor. Obviously these binaries
                  > seem to run on the '603 PPC that is in our
                  > LinkStations. My question is if there would be any
                  > significant advantage to using the source based Gentoo
                  > Linux (as a few others have done) and compiling
                  > perhaps more optimized code for our PPC other than
                  > running these binaries that were meant for vastly
                  > different hardware?

                  The PowerPC family is architecturally-compatible, so you should not see
                  any incompatibilities. The 64-bit binaries (ppc64) are different, this is
                  usually only used on high-powered servers. See
                  http://penguinppc.org/ppc64/
                  for a little more info.

                  I wouldn't expect to see Altivec, etc, support on the LinkStation, but
                  apps with this sort of code are probably rare.
                  --scott

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                • James Stewart
                  ... Oh, I missed that part. This is how I was running my Debian too. I did however build a Debian-only system on a different hard drive using the Japanese
                  Message 8 of 22 , Dec 10, 2004
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                    --- "C. Scott Ananian"
                    <cananian@...> wrote:

                    > On Thu, 9 Dec 2004, James Stewart wrote:
                    >
                    > > That distro had a few modifications dealing with
                    > > sending commands to the Atmel AVR processor to do
                    > > things like control the LEDs (I think) and to
                    > power
                    > > the thing off, and who know what else. Did you
                    > have
                    > > to do anything like this to deal with any such
                    > issues?
                    >
                    > no, because i left the original installation running
                    > underneath.
                    > I just launch ssh and my own customizations in the
                    > debian chroot.

                    Oh, I missed that part. This is how I was running my
                    Debian too. I did however build a Debian-only system
                    on a different hard drive using the Japanese
                    distribution, which booted directly and worked fine,
                    but I did notice some (actually the Debian Apt tools
                    discovered them) differences in some of the start-up
                    and shut-down scripts where commands were being sent
                    to the AVR. Fortunately we have a list of what these
                    commands do (in the "files" section of this group), so
                    it's mostly a no-brainer.

                    > > My question is if there would be any significant
                    > > advantage to using the source based Gentoo
                    > > Linux (as a few others have done) and compiling
                    > > perhaps more optimized code for our PPC other than
                    > > running these binaries that were meant for vastly
                    > > different hardware?
                    >
                    > The PowerPC family is architecturally-compatible, so
                    > you should not see any incompatibilities.

                    These binaries have been running, but I was wondering
                    if they would be much better (smaller/faster) if they
                    were compiled for the Linkstation. In other words,
                    I'm trying to determine if there is any advantage to
                    going to Gentoo over Debian. So far I haven't found
                    any other than many people (including me) find Debian
                    convoluted at times. I can certainly cite many
                    advantages of Debian over Gentoo however.




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                  • C. Scott Ananian
                    ... Gentoo has a reputation for super-optimizing, but I don t think there s much optimizing to do here. The LinkStation doesn t have any fancy architectural
                    Message 9 of 22 , Dec 10, 2004
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                      On Fri, 10 Dec 2004, James Stewart wrote:

                      >> The PowerPC family is architecturally-compatible, so
                      >> you should not see any incompatibilities.
                      >
                      > These binaries have been running, but I was wondering
                      > if they would be much better (smaller/faster) if they
                      > were compiled for the Linkstation. In other words,
                      > I'm trying to determine if there is any advantage to
                      > going to Gentoo over Debian. So far I haven't found

                      Gentoo has a reputation for super-optimizing, but I don't think there's
                      much optimizing to do here. The LinkStation doesn't have any fancy
                      architectural features to take advantage of -- it's just a pretty
                      straight-forward PowerPC implementation. No MMX type stuff, nor
                      StrongARM/Thumb-type stuff.

                      But then again, I have Debian installed on all my other machines, too.
                      --scott

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                    • C. Scott Ananian
                      ... Just create your new root in a special share ( /mnt/Debian ) and use mount --bind /mnt /mnt/Debian/mnt to make the shares visible in your chroot. --scott
                      Message 10 of 22 , Dec 13, 2004
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                        On Wed, 8 Dec 2004, Wilson wrote:

                        > I have something in my mind suddenly....can we use a
                        > USB flash disk? I'm thinking if the debian is on a
                        > USB flash disk, it may be nice and fast too, so we can
                        > do another root on USB and don't need to create our
                        > new root on /dev/hda3.

                        Just create your new root in a special share ( /mnt/Debian ) and use
                        'mount --bind /mnt /mnt/Debian/mnt' to make the shares visible in your
                        chroot.
                        --scott

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                      • ar_blanc
                        Hi. Thank s. Very good. Excelent. ... . . ... And now, just a question for the beginner i am. Can i remove every things in /mnt/Linux except Debian directory?
                        Message 11 of 22 , Jan 9, 2005
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                          Hi.

                          Thank's. Very good. Excelent.

                          > 1. Get root on the LinkStation. Create a share using the standard
                          > web interface; let's call it 'Linux'. We're
                          > going to create a slightly-expanded version of the basic
                          > LinkStation install in 'Linux' (you could perform these
                          > modifications directly to the linkstation root filesystem, but
                          > I prefer to leave that as close to 'stock' as possible).
                          > We'll use the bootstrap to install a 'proper' copy of Debian
                          > in a 'Debian' subdirectory of the 'Linux' share.
                          >

                          .
                          .

                          > ----------
                          > TA-DA!
                          > You've got a functioning Debian system!

                          And now, just a question for the beginner i am.

                          Can i remove every things in /mnt/Linux except Debian directory?

                          What is to do after reboot?
                          # chroot /mnt/Linux/Debian /bin/bash
                          # restart apache, ...

                          Is that right for a beginning?

                          Regards.
                        • Marshall D. Lewis
                          I installed gentoo on my linkstation over the weekend, and attached a usb hub to it. I now have 3 usb drives hanging off of it and working fine. Just thought
                          Message 12 of 22 , Jan 17, 2005
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                            I installed gentoo on my linkstation over the weekend, and attached a
                            usb hub to it. I now have 3 usb drives hanging off of it and working
                            fine. Just thought I'd let everyone know.

                            --
                            Marshall

                            --- In LinkStation_General@yahoogroups.com, Wilson <sonsondei@y...> wrote:
                            > > My dream here is to compile and install a kernel
                            > > that
                            > > has support (via modules) for everything you might
                            > > want to plug into a USB port, any file systems, and
                            > > any common network options so you can use things
                            > > like
                            > > other network interfaces, USB sound cards, CD/DVD
                            > > burners, serial/parellel adapters, more printers,
                            > > cameras, drive arrays, keyboards, mice & USB video
                            > > etc. with the Linkstation if you so desire.
                            >
                            >
                            > This is my dream too...having it connected to a USB
                            > hub, put USB serial console to see and manage the
                            > thing offline, put USB card reader to read different
                            > medias and share to web right away, put a fat32 USB
                            > disk or flash for friends to come and download files
                            > right away and they can use in MS windows...put USB
                            > network adapter to set up firewall and routing...
                            >
                            > My LS is bought mainly for playing and development..I
                            > don't mind to boot and clean up the parition and try
                            > again and again..since I have other servers to store
                            > my actual data. But my first project is to understand
                            > the things and scripts in /www to customize a better
                            > web admin tool for my elder brother who I first bought
                            > the LS120 for his company to use in HK, that's how I
                            > know this product and why I bought mine and compiled
                            > the samba 3.x for him to use chinese filename via
                            > WinXP.
                            >
                            > After it, I'll begin to work on the kernel (maybe)
                            > since hacking the actual flash is too risky and may
                            > not be recoverable if anything happens.
                            >
                            >
                            > W
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > __________________________________
                            > Do you Yahoo!?
                            > Yahoo! Mail - 250MB free storage. Do more. Manage less.
                            > http://info.mail.yahoo.com/mail_250
                          • Hans-Göran Puke
                            Congratulations, Marshall! Would you mind telling us how you did the Gentoo installation? Or even better, write a how-to document about it? Are you running the
                            Message 13 of 22 , Jan 19, 2005
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Congratulations, Marshall!
                              Would you mind telling us how you did the Gentoo installation?
                              Or even better, write a how-to document about it?
                              Are you running the Gentoo kernel or are you still using the supplied
                              kernel? In essence, is your system a mix between the MontaVista linux
                              supplied with the box and Gentoo, or is it 100% Gentoo?

                              Myself, I am running a mix of MontaVista and Debian. Have yet to
                              figure out if and how I should make the move to completely eliminate
                              MontaVista...

                              --
                              H-G

                              --- In LinkStation_General@yahoogroups.com, "Marshall D. Lewis"
                              <marshall@n...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I installed gentoo on my linkstation over the weekend, and attached a
                              > usb hub to it. I now have 3 usb drives hanging off of it and working
                              > fine. Just thought I'd let everyone know.
                              >
                              > --
                              > Marshall
                            • Marshall D. Lewis
                              I found the Gentoo installation and instructions at: http://www.kurobox.com/online/tiki-index.php?page=projectsGenToo Gentoo completely replaces the os files
                              Message 14 of 22 , Jan 19, 2005
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                                I found the Gentoo installation and instructions at:

                                http://www.kurobox.com/online/tiki-index.php?page=projectsGenToo

                                Gentoo completely replaces the os files that come with the linkstation,
                                but it is still using the supplied kernel. In order to get Gentoo
                                installed, I first had to turn my linkstation into a kurobox:

                                http://www.kurobox.com/online/tiki-index.php?page=Turn+your+Linkstation
                                +into+a+Kuro+Box

                                Overall then Gentoo installation has been pretty smooth, although I have
                                noticed some problems with random usb lockups. I'm still trying to
                                debug that though, I think I may have been pushing it a bit when I
                                attached a dvd-writer :) I wasn't actually trying to write dvds, I was
                                hoping I'd get a faster transfer rate copying data from a dvd to a usb
                                harddrive with the dvd-writer directly attached... to save anyone else
                                from attempting that, you don't. I was getting about half the rate that
                                I saw when copying via samba, and about a quarter the rate I'd see with
                                ftp.

                                Anyway, check out the forums on kurobox.com for more info on the Gentoo
                                install, and I'm more then happy to answer any questions or tell you
                                about the problems that I've run into.

                                --
                                Marshall



                                On Wed, 2005-01-19 at 14:40 +0000, Hans-Göran Puke wrote:
                                >
                                > Congratulations, Marshall!
                                > Would you mind telling us how you did the Gentoo installation?
                                > Or even better, write a how-to document about it?
                                > Are you running the Gentoo kernel or are you still using the supplied
                                > kernel? In essence, is your system a mix between the MontaVista linux
                                > supplied with the box and Gentoo, or is it 100% Gentoo?
                                >
                                > Myself, I am running a mix of MontaVista and Debian. Have yet to
                                > figure out if and how I should make the move to completely eliminate
                                > MontaVista...
                                >
                                > --
                                > H-G
                                >
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