Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Problems accessing LS outside LAN

Expand Messages
  • Jeff
    I m anticipating this would solve my problem, but I can t login to find out. I m assuming I need to telnet the WAN IP address to get into configure the modem
    Message 1 of 23 , Apr 25, 2006
      I'm anticipating this would solve my problem, but I can't login to
      find out. I'm assuming I need to telnet the WAN IP address to get into
      configure the modem itself to include the LS's IP address as a
      nameserver? I either have a different username/password for the modem
      than I thought I did or I don't have access to do this. If I can
      figure out how to login, I'll let you know if this works.

      --- In LinkStation_General@yahoogroups.com, "oseyboldt" <oli@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Jeff,
      > I had the same problem and I solved it by adding the router-IP
      > adress as a nameserver to the resolv.conf.
      >
      > To do so log in via telnet/ssh,
      > cd /etc
      > vi resolv.conf (the file was empty in my case)
      > "i" (for insert text)
      > type "nameserver your.own.router.ip"
      > press "esc", ":" and "x"
      >
      > then reboot and it should work (it did in my case).
      >
      > Good luck,
      > Oliver
      >
      > --- In LinkStation_General@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff"
      > <jfish_berean@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I still cannot FTP from the Internet from an outside location.
      > When I
      > > enter in my username/password combo with the WAN IP that the
      > newtwork
      > > with the LinkStation is on (i.e. ftp://username:password@)
      > > it times out every time.
      > >
      > > I set up my Linkstation to have a static IP address of 192.168.x.y
      > and
      > > a Gateway of 192.168.x.1 (which is the same as the IP address of my
      > > router). I can access the Linkstation locally either through the
      > > Workgroup, as a Network Drive, and by FTP using the local LAN IP
      > > 192.168.x.y. I configured my D-Link router to allow ports 20, 21,
      > and
      > > 1025-1027 for FTP access and set up the Virtual FTP Server to
      > point to
      > > the IP address of my LinkStation 192.168.x.y, but I still can't
      > access
      > > it from the internet - using passive or active modes of any FTP
      > > program or web browser...
      > >
      > > Neither Buffalo nor D-Link has been helpful at all. Any other
      > > thoughts out there? I'm still tinkering around with it to see if I
      > > can discover something I overlooked.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In LinkStation_General@yahoogroups.com, KeepIt SimpleStupid
      > > <keepitsimplestupid@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Opening ports 20-21 is not enough to get FTP to work.
      > > > You need to open a few (say 3) higher number ports.
      > > > Try opening 1025, 1026 and 1027 as well. I just
      > > > looked at what I had forwarded on my router. For more
      > > > info look at the RFC for FTP. You also need to use
      > > > the right mode of FTP.
      > > >
      > > > It's also difficult to test since you can't ftp from
      > > > inside to your public IP address. I was able to ssh
      > > > to a unix host and then ftp back into my LAN from that
      > > > host to test.
      > >
      >
    • KeepIt SimpleStupid
      Modems can be weird like mine. I have my DSL configured in bridge mode. The only way I can configure it is with a crossover cable directly connected to the
      Message 2 of 23 , Apr 25, 2006
        Modems can be weird like mine. I have my DSL
        configured in bridge mode. The only way I can
        configure it is with a crossover cable directly
        connected to the modem. This is neither here nor
        there, though.

        Routers on the other hand might be configured by
        telnet or http. They usually have an option to allow
        configuration from the WAN, otherwise they must be
        configured from the LAN side only.

        Your internal LAN when using DHCP gets the name server
        address using DHCP. When you have a static IP
        address, your nameserver and gateway for your LAN is
        generally your router's IP address.

        Without a gateway defined, you can't get outside your
        LAN. Without a nameserver defined things like
        www.google.com makes no sense, but 64.233.161.104
        does.

        The subnet mask determines what addresses the devices
        on your LAN respond to. So, the most common subnet
        mask of 255.255.255.0 means anything that matches the
        first 3 digits of the IP address. Anything else the
        router processes.

        I checked on a Unix system "ifconfig -a" lists some of
        the configuration parameters in a different form, but
        not the gateway.

        --- Jeff <jfish_berean@...> wrote:

        > I'm anticipating this would solve my problem, but I
        > can't login to
        > find out. I'm assuming I need to telnet the WAN IP
        > address to get into
        > configure the modem itself to include the LS's IP
        > address as a
        > nameserver? I either have a different
        > username/password for the modem
        > than I thought I did or I don't have access to do
        > this. If I can
        > figure out how to login, I'll let you know if this
        > works.
        >
        > --- In LinkStation_General@yahoogroups.com,
        > "oseyboldt" <oli@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi Jeff,
        > > I had the same problem and I solved it by adding
        > the router-IP
        > > adress as a nameserver to the resolv.conf.
        > >
        > > To do so log in via telnet/ssh,
        > > cd /etc
        > > vi resolv.conf (the file was empty in my case)
        > > "i" (for insert text)
        > > type "nameserver your.own.router.ip"
        > > press "esc", ":" and "x"
        > >
        > > then reboot and it should work (it did in my
        > case).
        > >
        > > Good luck,
        > > Oliver
        > >
        > > --- In LinkStation_General@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff"
        >
        > > <jfish_berean@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I still cannot FTP from the Internet from an
        > outside location.
        > > When I
        > > > enter in my username/password combo with the WAN
        > IP that the
        > > newtwork
        > > > with the LinkStation is on (i.e.
        > ftp://username:password@)
        > > > it times out every time.
        > > >
        > > > I set up my Linkstation to have a static IP
        > address of 192.168.x.y
        > > and
        > > > a Gateway of 192.168.x.1 (which is the same as
        > the IP address of my
        > > > router). I can access the Linkstation locally
        > either through the
        > > > Workgroup, as a Network Drive, and by FTP using
        > the local LAN IP
        > > > 192.168.x.y. I configured my D-Link router to
        > allow ports 20, 21,
        > > and
        > > > 1025-1027 for FTP access and set up the Virtual
        > FTP Server to
        > > point to
        > > > the IP address of my LinkStation 192.168.x.y,
        > but I still can't
        > > access
        > > > it from the internet - using passive or active
        > modes of any FTP
        > > > program or web browser...
        > > >
        > > > Neither Buffalo nor D-Link has been helpful at
        > all. Any other
        > > > thoughts out there? I'm still tinkering around
        > with it to see if I
        > > > can discover something I overlooked.
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In LinkStation_General@yahoogroups.com,
        > KeepIt SimpleStupid
        > > > <keepitsimplestupid@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Opening ports 20-21 is not enough to get FTP
        > to work.
        > > > > You need to open a few (say 3) higher number
        > ports.
        > > > > Try opening 1025, 1026 and 1027 as well. I
        > just
        > > > > looked at what I had forwarded on my router.
        > For more
        > > > > info look at the RFC for FTP. You also need
        > to use
        > > > > the right mode of FTP.
        > > > >
        > > > > It's also difficult to test since you can't
        > ftp from
        > > > > inside to your public IP address. I was able
        > to ssh
        > > > > to a unix host and then ftp back into my LAN
        > from that
        > > > > host to test.
        > > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail.yahoo.com
      • bill fumerola
        ... it masks away the last octet of the IP address. a network of 1.1.1.0 with a mask of 255.255.255.0 means that addresses belonging to that network are
        Message 3 of 23 , Apr 25, 2006
          On Tue, Apr 25, 2006 at 07:17:22PM -0700, KeepIt SimpleStupid wrote:
          > The subnet mask determines what addresses the devices
          > on your LAN respond to. So, the most common subnet
          > mask of 255.255.255.0 means anything that matches the
          > first 3 digits of the IP address. Anything else the
          > router processes.

          it masks away the last octet of the IP address. a network of 1.1.1.0
          with a mask of 255.255.255.0 means that addresses belonging to that
          network are 1.1.1.0 through 1.1.1.255.

          it's easier to think of it as a mask not as the decimal 255.255.255.0
          but the hex 0xffffff00. 1.1.1.0 is 0x01010100. with our netmask in mind,
          0x01010100 through 0x010101ff are part of the same network.

          > I checked on a Unix system "ifconfig -a" lists some of
          > the configuration parameters in a different form, but
          > not the gateway.

          interface ip assignment and routing are related but are two different
          concepts and are tracked in different structures.

          to see the a machine's gateway:
          as an unprivleged user: 'netstat -nrt | grep default'
          as root: 'route get 0.0.0.0'

          -- bill
        • KeepIt SimpleStupid
          ... Nice job: So to get the deafult nameserver: dig | grep default To get the default gateway netstat -nr | grep default and to find the IP address
          Message 4 of 23 , Apr 26, 2006
            --- bill fumerola <billf@...> wrote:

            <snip>

            Nice job:

            So to get the deafult nameserver: "dig | grep default"

            To get the default gateway
            "netstat -nr | grep default"

            and to find the IP address of the interfaces:
            "ifconfig -a", a netmask of ffffff00 hex is really
            255.255.255.0 in dotted decimal

            Simplistic, but it's a place to start. The -t option
            for netstat didn't work under SunOS.

            __________________________________________________
            Do You Yahoo!?
            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
            http://mail.yahoo.com
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.