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Re: [LinkStation_General] Re: Open Sesame?

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  • Ian Ball
    should you need one without having to run setup. i.e. run it from a floppy (remember those) or CD, DVD or USB pen drives etc etc. you can try this one
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 14, 2006
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      should you need one without having to run setup. i.e. run it from a floppy (remember those) or CD, DVD or USB pen drives etc etc.
      you can try this one

      http://www.nonags.com/nonags/lan.html

      scroll down to "SoftPerfect Network Scanner" and good luck, hope you find your allusive box.

      With
      My
      Very
      Best
      Regards And A Very

      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Saturday, January 14, 2006 2:22 AM
      Subject: [LinkStation_General] Re: Open Sesame?

      try this freeware, very useful network discovery tool

      http://www.snapfiles.com/get/lanlook.html


      --- In LinkStation_General@yahoogroups.com, "James Ronald"
      <jronald@c...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "prb0x" <yahoo_ls@t...>
      > To: <LinkStation_General@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Friday, January 13, 2006 11:12 AM
      > Subject: [LinkStation_General] Re: Open Sesame?
      >
      >
      > > --- In LinkStation_General@yahoogroups.com, Sean Bennett
      > > <mail.jsbennett@g...> wrote:
      > >>
      > >> Hi all;
      > >>
      > >> In short:
      > >> I've plugged my HG into a new router, but have forgotten the former
      > > network
      > >> configurations for which the kurobox was configured; as such it
      is not
      > >> visible on the network, and I can't get into it (The old router
      has been
      > >> reset and it's configuration settings long gone).   Any ideas on how
      > > I can
      > >> access my kurobox to either discover or reset the current network
      work
      > >> configuation?
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> TIA!
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> Sean in Tokyo.
      > >>
      > >
      > > First run in windows shell run:
      > >
      > > arp -a
      > >
      > > That should give a list of all recently known IP and MAC addresses
      > > accessed by the host.  You might be lucky and it's there.
      > >
      > > Can you remember the address range you put it on? i.e if it was
      > > 192.168.0.X then run in a windows shell:
      > >
      > > ping 192.168.0.255
      > >
      > > let it go 4 times - you should get an echo from only one address
      > > (usually your most responsive linux box).  Basically it's pinging the
      > > broadcast address - windows will only accept the first response but
      > > you can do this under linux and see the results for multiple hosts but
      > > it seems windows boxes don't answer broadcast requests.  Actually
      > > maybe it's just certain linux kernels because my two VoIP phones, PS2,
      > > wireless bridge, repeater and media player don't reply either.
      > >
      > >
      > > Though I'm not too sure if you are on different subnets and moreoever
      > > different masks if you can ping across subnets.  I've found it has
      > > worked in the past.
      > >
      > > The other thing you could try is nmap because I think it formulates
      > > packets that work at lower OSI levels than ping.  I tried looking for
      > > a sort of 'ping' that works with MAC Addresses.
      > >
      > > The other thing you can do is reboot the HG in emergency mode and set
      > > your IP on your PC to that given in the manual log in, mount your main
      > > drive and view what settings you have in your net config file.
      > >
      > > Cheers,
      > > Al
      > >
      > > output below:
      > >
      > >
      > > G:\>ping 192.168.0.255
      > >
      > > Pinging 192.168.0.255 with 32 bytes of data:
      > >
      > > Reply from 192.168.0.66: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      > > Reply from 192.168.0.66: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      > > Reply from 192.168.0.66: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      > > Reply from 192.168.0.66: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
      > >
      > > Ping statistics for 192.168.0.255:
      > >    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
      > > Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
      > >    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms
      > >
      > > G:\>arp -a
      > >
      > > Interface: 192.168.0.101 --- 0x2
      > >  Internet Address      Physical Address      Type
      > >  192.168.0.66          00-07-40-fb-e4-76     dynamic
      > >  192.168.0.100         00-07-40-fb-dd-83     dynamic
      > >
      > > bash-2.05a# ping -b -c 2 192.168.0.255
      > > WARNING: pinging broadcast address
      > > PING 192.168.0.255 (192.168.0.255) from 192.168.0.66 : 56(84) bytes of
      > > data.
      > > 64 bytes from 192.168.0.66: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.104 ms
      > > 64 bytes from 192.168.0.100: icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=0.312 ms (DUP!)
      > > 64 bytes from 192.168.0.254: icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=1.11 ms (DUP!)
      > >
      > >
      >
      > Very Cool!!  I used to know this.  I'm just spoiled these days using
      managed
      > switches and forget the basics tools.  Also it's important to do the
      arp -a
      > right after the ping.  Not all of my hosts show up but most do
      including my
      > Kuro.
      >





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