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Mailserver on a LinkStation

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  • nz_49b
    Hi, as i m new on linux, i would like to have a suggestion which linux i should install on my LS160 (a brand new one ... 2 days). And i would like to know how
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 8, 2005
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      Hi,

      as i'm new on linux, i would like to have a suggestion which linux i
      should install on my LS160 (a brand new one ... 2 days). And i would
      like to know how if it's possible to run a mail-server on the LS160
      (for home-use) and how i can do this.

      many thanks
      NZ
    • Nick Pappas
      If you are new to Linux your choices of Linux flavors, if you want to install a complete system, is Debian. It is the only Linux type that has any
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 8, 2005
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        If you are new to Linux your choices of Linux flavors, if you want to
        install a complete system, is Debian. It is the only Linux type that
        has any documentation on how to get it up and running on a
        LinkStation. Check out http://www.linkstationwiki.org for info.

        Now for a mail server you might be able to install it on a "stock"
        LinkStation. Once you gain root access to your LinkStation you are
        working with a stripped down version of Linux that can be coerced into
        doing a suprisingly large amount of things. I would not be suprised
        if you can install everything you need for a mail server on a base
        LinkStation w/ the default OS.

        You'll want to look at 'fetchmail' (to get mail) and I used to use
        courier-imap as my e-mail server. Simple to set up and it did it's
        job.

        Since the topic is mail servers, I'll put in my 2-cents on home mail
        servers and how useful they are... even though you didn't ask. :)

        I used to run a mail server out of my home (not on a LinkStation).
        The server would pull my mail from multiple e-mail accounts and store
        it all in a central location, with access via POP3 and IMAP. I was
        pretty pleased with myself when I first set it up and loved working
        with it at the beginning... then it just became something I had to
        maintain.

        These days I forward all my mail to Gmail. I never thought I'd
        actually plug a web-based e-mail system but it is nice not having to
        worry about keeping my own server up, not having to worry about my IP
        changing, or if the network I am is blocking POP3 or IMAP, and just
        being able to read/write e-mail over the browser. Another option to
        think about perhaps.

        ... and the Gmail interface is very different from Yahoo, so don't
        judge it based on that. :)

        Good luck!

        On 11/8/05, nz_49b <nz_49b@...> wrote:
        > Hi,
        >
        > as i'm new on linux, i would like to have a suggestion which linux i
        > should install on my LS160 (a brand new one ... 2 days). And i would
        > like to know how if it's possible to run a mail-server on the LS160
        > (for home-use) and how i can do this.
        >
        > many thanks
        > NZ
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


        --
        Whatever you do - don't congratulate yourself too much, or berate
        yourself either.
        Your choices are half chance, and so are everybody else's.
      • James Stewart
        I agree with most of of what Nick says. Since getting Linux onto a Linkstation in the first place is kind of a chore with many pitfalls, you might consider
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 8, 2005
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          I agree with most of of what Nick says. Since getting Linux onto a
          Linkstation in the first place is kind of a chore with many pitfalls,
          you might consider installing Debian Linux on a PC first just to see
          how you like it and to get more familiar with Debian. If you get
          everything working the way you want on the PC, once you get the same
          stuff installed on the LinkStation, you can simply copy over the
          configuration files and you should be up an running in the same way.

          Dealing with Linux on the Linkstation is somewhat challenging to
          someone new to Linux. However if you are up to it, it is all
          possible. I am running the Exim mail-transfer-agent on my Debianized
          Linkstation at the moment. My problem is that I don't know much about
          mail servers, but I can send it email from out on the Internet and it
          gets it. Like Nick, I too just use a Web based email service (Yahoo)
          and like it more and more every year. Yahoo's spam filtering seems to
          work amazingly well.

          --- In LinkStation_General@yahoogroups.com, Nick Pappas
          <nwpappas@g...> wrote:
          >
          > If you are new to Linux your choices of Linux flavors, if you want to
          > install a complete system, is Debian. It is the only Linux type that
          > has any documentation on how to get it up and running on a
          > LinkStation. Check out http://www.linkstationwiki.org for info.
          >
          > Now for a mail server you might be able to install it on a "stock"
          > LinkStation. Once you gain root access to your LinkStation you are
          > working with a stripped down version of Linux that can be coerced into
          > doing a suprisingly large amount of things. I would not be suprised
          > if you can install everything you need for a mail server on a base
          > LinkStation w/ the default OS.
          >
          > You'll want to look at 'fetchmail' (to get mail) and I used to use
          > courier-imap as my e-mail server. Simple to set up and it did it's
          > job.
          >
          > Since the topic is mail servers, I'll put in my 2-cents on home mail
          > servers and how useful they are... even though you didn't ask. :)
          >
          > I used to run a mail server out of my home (not on a LinkStation).
          > The server would pull my mail from multiple e-mail accounts and store
          > it all in a central location, with access via POP3 and IMAP. I was
          > pretty pleased with myself when I first set it up and loved working
          > with it at the beginning... then it just became something I had to
          > maintain.
          >
          > These days I forward all my mail to Gmail. I never thought I'd
          > actually plug a web-based e-mail system but it is nice not having to
          > worry about keeping my own server up, not having to worry about my IP
          > changing, or if the network I am is blocking POP3 or IMAP, and just
          > being able to read/write e-mail over the browser. Another option to
          > think about perhaps.
          >
          > ... and the Gmail interface is very different from Yahoo, so don't
          > judge it based on that. :)
          >
          > Good luck!
          >
          > On 11/8/05, nz_49b <nz_49b@y...> wrote:
          > > Hi,
          > >
          > > as i'm new on linux, i would like to have a suggestion which linux i
          > > should install on my LS160 (a brand new one ... 2 days). And i would
          > > like to know how if it's possible to run a mail-server on the LS160
          > > (for home-use) and how i can do this.
          > >
          > > many thanks
          > > NZ
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
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