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  • dfw0118
    Hi all, I ve been messing with my linkstation for a little while now. Actually, I bought a device that s called the Kuro-box which basically is a rebranded
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 21, 2004
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      Hi all,

      I've been messing with my "linkstation" for a little while now.
      Actually, I bought a device that's called the "Kuro-box" which
      basically is a rebranded Linkstation sans HD. It's exactly the same
      as a linkstation, but only sold in the Japanese market afaik.

      Anyway, was able to get apache 2.0.51 and Samba 3.0.7 compiled (local
      build) and running on my system w/o any major problems. Getting the
      build environment was the most time consuming part even though the
      Kuro-box comes with a CD of binaries (gcc 2.95.3, binutils, etc).
      Also got openssh and openssl on the box. The CD had binaries of those
      on there too.

      Right now I have a 120GB HD in the box but I was thinking of putting a
      160GB or 250GB in there since the dev stuff takes up a lot of space.
      I had to repartition the drive just to accomodate since everything
      gets installed under /usr in the root partition and it's only 120MB or
      so by default. Here's my current partition scheme:

      dfw@KURO-BOX:~$ df -h
      Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
      /dev/hda1 122M 27M 89M 24% /
      /dev/hda4 6.4G 260M 5.8G 5% /usr
      /dev/hda3 104G 3.2G 95G 4% /mnt
      /dev/sda 250M 211M 40M 85% /mnt/flash

      /dev/sda is my 256MB USB fob. I had to create the mount point and
      manually mount it however.

      I've read through a number of Japanese webpages and there's a lot of
      info there. When I can get some time to translate, I plan on putting
      that info on here and on my webpage.

      - David
    • shawn_ledbetter
      ... Cool -- I ve tried following a couple of those sites via online translators, but it doesn t quite work for technical work. The ones that interest me most
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 21, 2004
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        --- In LinkStation_General@yahoogroups.com, "dfw0118" <dfw1234@h...>
        wrote:

        > I've read through a number of Japanese webpages and there's a lot of
        > info there. When I can get some time to translate, I plan on putting
        > that info on here and on my webpage.

        Cool -- I've tried following a couple of those sites via online
        translators, but it doesn't quite work for technical work. The ones
        that interest me most are the Debian conversions. From what I can
        tell, you have to rip apart the HD inside and mount on a PC, then
        untar or dd over the root filesystem. Unfortunately I couldn't crack
        mine open to mount it - I might try again sometime later. I've got a
        couple links posted at http://del.icio.us/sml/linkstation that are
        frontends into translators. You can see what fun it is :)

        -sml
      • dfw0118
        ... crack ... a ... Reading those machine translated web pages were just too confusing and sometimes funny. :) Luckily I can read enough Japanese to tell
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 22, 2004
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          > Cool -- I've tried following a couple of those sites via online
          > translators, but it doesn't quite work for technical work. The ones
          > that interest me most are the Debian conversions. From what I can
          > tell, you have to rip apart the HD inside and mount on a PC, then
          > untar or dd over the root filesystem. Unfortunately I couldn't
          crack
          > mine open to mount it - I might try again sometime later. I've got
          a
          > couple links posted at http://del.icio.us/sml/linkstation that are
          > frontends into translators. You can see what fun it is :)
          >
          > -sml

          Reading those machine translated web pages were just too confusing and
          sometimes funny. :) Luckily I can read enough Japanese to tell what's
          going on for the most part.

          It's not too hard to open the box, but of course the first time will
          be difficult. Basically you have to take the "belt" off first. It's
          the front plastic part of the unit that has the status lights and
          such. There are tabs on the top and bottom of the unit that you push
          in. If you look in the grooves you'll see a button-like spot. There
          also might be a screw in the back of the unit by the ethernet port
          that you need to take out. Might be hidden behind a sticker or
          something. Mine didn't have one, but others probably do.

          After you push them in, then you should be able to pull the belt off
          by pulling it toward the front about an inch. Then just lift it off.
          Once that is off, you'll see that the case is a clamshell with more
          tabs to undo. There's 4 of them I believe.

          Once you have the clamshell open, then it's pretty easy to get to the
          HD. However, you still have to unscrew the motherboard, HD bay, and
          perhaps the power supply.

          Hope this helps.

          - David
        • Stuart Stegall
          Just a FYI for those who are from the US and Canada, those silly stickers that say you ll void your warranty if they are cut through and what not. We have
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 22, 2004
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            Just a FYI for those who are from the US and Canada, those silly stickers that say you'll void your warranty if they are cut through
            and what not. We have lovely warranty laws in the US and Canada (probably other countries as well), and those laws say that unless
            you do something that would cause the device to malfunction, that they cannot void your warranty. So feel free to slice those stickers.

            dfw0118 wrote:
            >>Cool -- I've tried following a couple of those sites via online
            >>translators, but it doesn't quite work for technical work. The ones
            >>that interest me most are the Debian conversions. From what I can
            >>tell, you have to rip apart the HD inside and mount on a PC, then
            >>untar or dd over the root filesystem. Unfortunately I couldn't
            >
            > crack
            >
            >>mine open to mount it - I might try again sometime later. I've got
            >
            > a
            >
            >>couple links posted at http://del.icio.us/sml/linkstation that are
            >>frontends into translators. You can see what fun it is :)
            >>
            >>-sml
            >
            >
            > Reading those machine translated web pages were just too confusing and
            > sometimes funny. :) Luckily I can read enough Japanese to tell what's
            > going on for the most part.
            >
            > It's not too hard to open the box, but of course the first time will
            > be difficult. Basically you have to take the "belt" off first. It's
            > the front plastic part of the unit that has the status lights and
            > such. There are tabs on the top and bottom of the unit that you push
            > in. If you look in the grooves you'll see a button-like spot. There
            > also might be a screw in the back of the unit by the ethernet port
            > that you need to take out. Might be hidden behind a sticker or
            > something. Mine didn't have one, but others probably do.
            >
            > After you push them in, then you should be able to pull the belt off
            > by pulling it toward the front about an inch. Then just lift it off.
            > Once that is off, you'll see that the case is a clamshell with more
            > tabs to undo. There's 4 of them I believe.
            >
            > Once you have the clamshell open, then it's pretty easy to get to the
            > HD. However, you still have to unscrew the motherboard, HD bay, and
            > perhaps the power supply.
            >
            > Hope this helps.
            >
            > - David
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