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Re: [Libertarians-Animal Rights] To Moderators: Public Setting for LFAR

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  • James Dawson
    This Public Or Not issue has several aspects: technical, practical and philosophical.   On the technical side, I tried a few experiments.  I looked at
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 11 1:47 PM
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      This "Public Or Not" issue has several aspects: technical, practical and philosophical.
       
      On the technical side, I tried a few experiments.  I looked at LFAR, and yes, I could see full e-mail addresses.  But was this because I was the owner?  Or a moderator?
       
      I looked at another public Yahoo forum, Left Libertarian 2, which I'm a member of, but neither own nor moderate.  There I could find only partial e-mail addresses, the "name part" followed by dots.  Now, admittedly, it might not take much guessing to fill in the blank and thus have somebody's e-mail address, so maybe even that would be unacceptable to someone particularly concerned about privacy.
       
      On the other hand, if somebody's determined to dredge out somebody else's e-mail address, all they have to join a non-public forum, and they'd have all the information present on a public forum, wouldn't they?  And how far can you, or do you want to go, in screening membership requests?  For most groups I've seen, it's pretty much automatic.
       
      Philosophically, I have long wondered if all this concern over "Internet privacy" isn't a bit of an over-reaction to a few horror stories, that resulted from a ridiculous flight from common sense---plastering your naked pictures all over social networking sites, etc., etc.  All my life, I've lived in rural areas, as I do today, and rural mailboxes along very isolated country roads, stand unlocked, day after day, year after year, decade after decade.  Nobody worries about anybody stealing their mail, or putting bombs or rattlesnakes in their box.  Oh, I'm sure it's happened, but what are the risks and costs of putting up so many barriers to delivery---padlocks---it slows things downs and complicates them and makes them so expensive it'd be ridiculous.  My experience with the Internet has been that it's almost harder to contact somebody than it was back in the old "snail mail" and "land-line phone" days.  Do we want to be "connected" or not?
       
      Practically, LFAR and many public Yahoo forums---which admittedly are in a minority---are of a political, social, religious, and philosophical nature.  They're not, nor are they meant to be, PERSONAL.  As I envision them, they exist to educate, inform and raise awareness AMONG THE PUBLIC.  They're not a place to spill your guts or reveal your innermost secrets.  There are other forums for that, and even those that are well moderated, are probably a little risky to ones privacy.
       
      I have found discussions with my name on them on various public (non-Yahoo) forums I've contributed to through Google searches.  I admit I've never done a thorough investigation, but I doubt that my e-mail address was displayed.  Nor was I that bothered that my comments were shown access to.  Actually, I would have been delighted if somebody HAD contacted me for further comment.
       
      Now, I know everybody has their own gut-level feelings about having their comments available to the public, and I don't want to belittle them, but the importance of LFAR, and many other public Internet forums, as educational tools outweighs concerns about personal privacy.  WE NEED TO GET THE WORD OUT, and too many barriers impede that.  Many people don't like to join groups, because they don't like the contracts, agreements, giving personal info, etc.  But they may like to read the ideas and discussions in them.  I'd like to keep that option open.
       
      Of course, I am open to further discussion.
       
      Thanks,
      James N. Dawson






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    • maureen a. gest
      Well, let s try it then. I think one of the problems public groups have, besides those mentioned below, is advertisers/spammers trolling for email addresses.
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 11 3:03 PM
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        Well, let's try it then. I think one of the problems public groups have, besides those mentioned below, is advertisers/spammers trolling for email addresses. But, I'm not that Internet savvy and, as James indicated, advertisers can get email addresses by briefly joining listserves & keeping the addresses for future spam. We could try the public route and see how it goes.





        ________________________________
        From: James Dawson <jamesndawson@...>
        To: Libertarians_For_Animal_Rights@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sun, April 11, 2010 4:47:55 PM
        Subject: Re: [Libertarians-Animal Rights] To Moderators: Public Setting for LFAR


        This "Public Or Not" issue has several aspects: technical, practical and philosophical.

        On the technical side, I tried a few experiments. I looked at LFAR, and yes, I could see full e-mail addresses. But was this because I was the owner? Or a moderator?

        I looked at another public Yahoo forum, Left Libertarian 2, which I'm a member of, but neither own nor moderate. There I could find only partial e-mail addresses, the "name part" followed by dots. Now, admittedly, it might not take much guessing to fill in the blank and thus have somebody's e-mail address, so maybe even that would be unacceptable to someone particularly concerned about privacy.

        On the other hand, if somebody's determined to dredge out somebody else's e-mail address, all they have to join a non-public forum, and they'd have all the information present on a public forum, wouldn't they? And how far can you, or do you want to go, in screening membership requests? For most groups I've seen, it's pretty much automatic.

        Philosophically, I have long wondered if all this concern over "Internet privacy" isn't a bit of an over-reaction to a few horror stories, that resulted from a ridiculous flight from common sense---plastering your naked pictures all over social networking sites, etc., etc. All my life, I've lived in rural areas, as I do today, and rural mailboxes along very isolated country roads, stand unlocked, day after day, year after year, decade after decade. Nobody worries about anybody stealing their mail, or putting bombs or rattlesnakes in their box. Oh, I'm sure it's happened, but what are the risks and costs of putting up so many barriers to delivery---padlocks ---it slows things downs and complicates them and makes them so expensive it'd be ridiculous. My experience with the Internet has been that it's almost harder to contact somebody than it was back in the old "snail mail" and "land-line phone" days. Do we want to be "connected" or not?

        Practically, LFAR and many public Yahoo forums---which admittedly are in a minority---are of a political, social, religious, and philosophical nature. They're not, nor are they meant to be, PERSONAL. As I envision them, they exist to educate, inform and raise awareness AMONG THE PUBLIC. They're not a place to spill your guts or reveal your innermost secrets. There are other forums for that, and even those that are well moderated, are probably a little risky to ones privacy.

        I have found discussions with my name on them on various public (non-Yahoo) forums I've contributed to through Google searches. I admit I've never done a thorough investigation, but I doubt that my e-mail address was displayed. Nor was I that bothered that my comments were shown access to. Actually, I would have been delighted if somebody HAD contacted me for further comment.

        Now, I know everybody has their own gut-level feelings about having their comments available to the public, and I don't want to belittle them, but the importance of LFAR, and many other public Internet forums, as educational tools outweighs concerns about personal privacy. WE NEED TO GET THE WORD OUT, and too many barriers impede that. Many people don't like to join groups, because they don't like the contracts, agreements, giving personal info, etc. But they may like to read the ideas and discussions in them. I'd like to keep that option open.

        Of course, I am open to further discussion.

        Thanks,
        James N. Dawson

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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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