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US Registrar Yanks WikiLeaks Domain

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  • Jon Roland
    US Registrar Yanks WikiLeaks Domain It is interesting that a
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 4, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      US Registrar Yanks WikiLeaks Domain
      <http://news.antiwar.com/2010/12/03/wikileaks-registrar-problems-leave-site-difficult-to-reach/>

      It is interesting that a country that espouses Freedom of Speech will
      resort to such tactics.

      Now, some will say, "Well, he is releasing secret information that might
      cost lives". There is, however, doubtful support of that contention.

      If there is a problem in that area, it is not Americans having access to
      that information who will pose threats to those who might be at risk.
      Obviously, it is foreigners who have access that pose that risk.

      So, the rest of the world can read WikiLeaks, since it is only the US
      Registrar blocking the domain. Consequently, it is only Americans who
      are denied the information.

      Is it, perhaps, more likely that the government doesn't want US to know
      what they are up to?

      What other websites will be disabled the same way, because the
      government doesn't want criticism or exposure? Will constitution.org be
      next?

      If you want to go to WikiLeaks, the IP number will get you there without
      the domain lookup (word address).

      Use one of these links to go direct to Wikileaks.

      http://213.251.145.96/
      http://46.59.1.2/

      Spread the word.

      [This message is modified from an original by Gary Hunt.]

      -- Jon ----------------------------------------------------------
      Constitution Society http://constitution.org 2900 W Anderson Ln
      C-200-322 Austin, TX 78757 512/299-5001 jon.roland@...
      ----------------------------------------------------------




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Harland Harrison
      How to keep Wikileaks up despite the US government ban If you have a server, you can help Wikileaks stay available by hosting a mirror of their site. Risk
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 5, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        How to keep Wikileaks up despite the US government ban



        If you have a server, you can help Wikileaks stay available by hosting a mirror
        of their site. Risk seems minimal because Wikileaks is going to release all of
        the URLs at once after they have uploaded more than 50 mirrors. You can sign up
        at

        http://Wikileaks.ch/mass-mirror.html

        for now, you can reach Wikileaks there, anyway. If worst comes to worst, try
        these:


        http://213.251.145.96/mass-mirror.html

        http://46.59.1.2/mass-mirror.html

        Please spread the word

        ----- Message d'origine ----
        De : Jon Roland <jon.roland@...>
        À : liberty-list@yahoogroups.com
        Envoyé le : Sam 4 décembre 2010, 14h 58min 21s
        Objet : [Libertarian] US Registrar Yanks WikiLeaks Domain


        US Registrar Yanks WikiLeaks Domain

        <http://news.antiwar.com/2010/12/03/wikileaks-registrar-problems-leave-site-difficult-to-reach/>


        It is interesting that a country that espouses Freedom of Speech will
        resort to such tactics.

        Now, some will say, "Well, he is releasing secret information that might
        cost lives". There is, however, doubtful support of that contention.

        If there is a problem in that area, it is not Americans having access to
        that information who will pose threats to those who might be at risk.
        Obviously, it is foreigners who have access that pose that risk.

        So, the rest of the world can read WikiLeaks, since it is only the US
        Registrar blocking the domain. Consequently, it is only Americans who
        are denied the information.

        Is it, perhaps, more likely that the government doesn't want US to know
        what they are up to?

        What other websites will be disabled the same way, because the
        government doesn't want criticism or exposure? Will constitution.org be
        next?

        If you want to go to WikiLeaks, the IP number will get you there without
        the domain lookup (word address).

        Use one of these links to go direct to Wikileaks.

        http://213.251.145.96/
        http://46.59.1.2/

        Spread the word.

        [This message is modified from an original by Gary Hunt.]

        -- Jon ----------------------------------------------------------
        Constitution Society http://constitution.org 2900 W Anderson Ln
        C-200-322 Austin, TX 78757 512/299-5001 jon.roland@...
        ----------------------------------------------------------
      • Bob Giramma
        The two examples in the story, EveryDNS.net and Amazon.com, are private sector entities. So it’s not the government in this case. From: Jon Roland Sent:
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 5, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          The two examples in the story, EveryDNS.net and Amazon.com, are private sector entities. So it’s not the government in this case.

          From: Jon Roland
          Sent: Saturday, December 04, 2010 2:58 PM
          To: liberty-list@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Libertarian] US Registrar Yanks WikiLeaks Domain



          US Registrar Yanks WikiLeaks Domain
          <http://news.antiwar.com/2010/12/03/wikileaks-registrar-problems-leave-site-difficult-to-reach/>

          It is interesting that a country that espouses Freedom of Speech will
          resort to such tactics.

          Now, some will say, "Well, he is releasing secret information that might
          cost lives". There is, however, doubtful support of that contention.

          If there is a problem in that area, it is not Americans having access to
          that information who will pose threats to those who might be at risk.
          Obviously, it is foreigners who have access that pose that risk.

          So, the rest of the world can read WikiLeaks, since it is only the US
          Registrar blocking the domain. Consequently, it is only Americans who
          are denied the information.

          Is it, perhaps, more likely that the government doesn't want US to know
          what they are up to?

          What other websites will be disabled the same way, because the
          government doesn't want criticism or exposure? Will constitution.org be
          next?

          If you want to go to WikiLeaks, the IP number will get you there without
          the domain lookup (word address).

          Use one of these links to go direct to Wikileaks.

          http://213.251.145.96/
          http://46.59.1.2/

          Spread the word.

          [This message is modified from an original by Gary Hunt.]

          -- Jon ----------------------------------------------------------
          Constitution Society http://constitution.org 2900 W Anderson Ln
          C-200-322 Austin, TX 78757 512/299-5001 mailto:jon.roland%40constitution.org
          ----------------------------------------------------------

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • ejpoleii
          Um. You re kidding. Right? Ed$
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 9, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Um. You're kidding. Right?

            Ed$

            --- In Libertarian@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Giramma" <evil_spock@...> wrote:
            >
            > The two examples in the story, EveryDNS.net and Amazon.com, are private sector entities. So it’s not the government in this case.
            >
            > From: Jon Roland
            > Sent: Saturday, December 04, 2010 2:58 PM
            > To: liberty-list@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [Libertarian] US Registrar Yanks WikiLeaks Domain
            >
            >
            >
            > US Registrar Yanks WikiLeaks Domain
            > <http://news.antiwar.com/2010/12/03/wikileaks-registrar-problems-leave-site-difficult-to-reach/>
            >
            > It is interesting that a country that espouses Freedom of Speech will
            > resort to such tactics.
            >
            > Now, some will say, "Well, he is releasing secret information that might
            > cost lives". There is, however, doubtful support of that contention.
            >
            > If there is a problem in that area, it is not Americans having access to
            > that information who will pose threats to those who might be at risk.
            > Obviously, it is foreigners who have access that pose that risk.
            >
            > So, the rest of the world can read WikiLeaks, since it is only the US
            > Registrar blocking the domain. Consequently, it is only Americans who
            > are denied the information.
            >
            > Is it, perhaps, more likely that the government doesn't want US to know
            > what they are up to?
            >
            > What other websites will be disabled the same way, because the
            > government doesn't want criticism or exposure? Will constitution.org be
            > next?
            >
            > If you want to go to WikiLeaks, the IP number will get you there without
            > the domain lookup (word address).
            >
            > Use one of these links to go direct to Wikileaks.
            >
            > http://213.251.145.96/
            > http://46.59.1.2/
            >
            > Spread the word.
            >
            > [This message is modified from an original by Gary Hunt.]
            >
            > -- Jon ----------------------------------------------------------
            > Constitution Society http://constitution.org 2900 W Anderson Ln
            > C-200-322 Austin, TX 78757 512/299-5001 mailto:jon.roland%40constitution.org
            > ----------------------------------------------------------
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
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