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Re: Ancient Roadway

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  • Andis Kaulins
    Len, I have - somewhat reluctantly - OK d your posting but must ask you - as you have offered - to provide more documentation. A gathering of flat stones
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 2, 2006
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      Len,

      I have - somewhat reluctantly - OK'd your posting but must ask you - as you have offered - to provide more documentation.

      A gathering of flat stones somewhere does not make a roadway built by some ancient "civilization" predating the American Indians.

      If it is not a road - and that it is not a "road" is likely if such a construction predates the American Indians - then, if legitimate, it might be a kind of cursus. A cursus is defined as follows in the Wikipedia:

      "Cursus was a name given by early British archaeologists such as William Stukeley to the large parallel lengths of banks with external ditches which they thought were early Roman athletics tracks, hence the Latin name 'Cursus', meaning 'Circus'. Cursus monuments are now understood to be Neolithic structures and may have been of ceremonial function."

      As you see from that quotation, mainstream archaeologists have historically also confused Stone Age ceremonial constructions with what they thought were Roman roads and tracks. Hence you need to describe your stones in greater detail. How long is this "track", how broad, etc. and from where to where does it appear to lead. Where EXACTLY is it located? GPS coordinates of start and beginning of the flat stones? Are there any other apparently ancient constructions of any kind (e.g. mounds) in the area? What do the local archaeologists say?

      The best thing is to make a drawing of the area to scale and to send it to me for posting to this list.

      Thanks.

      Andis

      --- In LexiLine@yahoogroups.com, "ldbenschop" <lbenschop@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi;
      > My name is Len Benschop, I reside in Ontario Canada.
      >
      > There is an ancient roadway that is about 2 miles from where I live.
      > Remnants can still be seen to this day, it is apparently paved with
      > round stones and represents an engineering skill not unlike that of
      > the Romans or Greeks. It is very straight, and has a remarkably flat
      > grade, like a railway bed.
      >
      > Interestingly, most people today do not even notice it's existence,
      > because it has the appearance of an old railway bed.
      >
      > The history of this area is well documented since whites first set
      > foot here, around 1600 AD. This roadway appears to predate the native
      > indians.
      >
      > The local natives were inquired of by the white settlers, who or what
      > had made this roadway, and none of the natives knew. It had always
      > been there from their recollection.
      >
      > This definitely needs to be explored further.
      >
      > I can send more independant info if anyone here is interested. I would
      > be interested in hearing your opinions on what this roadway might
      > actually be, and what civilization may have created it.
      >
      > Regards
      > Len
      >
    • Tom Graves
      Hi Len, Keep up the good work. Please tell us more. Thanks, Thomas Graves ... as ... William ... to ... what ... etc. ... Are ... it ... native ... what ...
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 2, 2006
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        Hi Len,

        Keep up the good work. Please tell us more.

        Thanks, Thomas Graves

        __________________________________


        --- In LexiLine@yahoogroups.com, "Andis Kaulins" <a1ndiskaulins@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Len,
        >
        > I have - somewhat reluctantly - OK'd your posting but must ask you -
        as
        > you have offered - to provide more documentation.
        >
        > A gathering of flat stones somewhere does not make a roadway built by
        > some ancient "civilization" predating the American Indians.
        >
        > If it is not a road - and that it is not a "road" is likely if such a
        > construction predates the American Indians - then, if legitimate, it
        > might be a kind of cursus. A cursus is defined as follows in the
        > Wikipedia:
        >
        > "Cursus was a name given by early British archaeologists such as
        William
        > Stukeley to the large parallel lengths of banks with external ditches
        > which they thought were early Roman athletics tracks, hence the Latin
        > name 'Cursus', meaning 'Circus'. Cursus monuments are now understood
        to
        > be Neolithic structures and may have been of ceremonial function."
        >
        > As you see from that quotation, mainstream archaeologists have
        > historically also confused Stone Age ceremonial constructions with
        what
        > they thought were Roman roads and tracks. Hence you need to describe
        > your stones in greater detail. How long is this "track", how broad,
        etc.
        > and from where to where does it appear to lead. Where EXACTLY is it
        > located? GPS coordinates of start and beginning of the flat stones?
        Are
        > there any other apparently ancient constructions of any kind (e.g.
        > mounds) in the area? What do the local archaeologists say?
        >
        > The best thing is to make a drawing of the area to scale and to send
        it
        > to me for posting to this list.
        >
        > Thanks.
        >
        > Andis
        >
        > --- In LexiLine@yahoogroups.com, "ldbenschop" lbenschop@ wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi;
        > > My name is Len Benschop, I reside in Ontario Canada.
        > >
        > > There is an ancient roadway that is about 2 miles from where I live.
        > > Remnants can still be seen to this day, it is apparently paved with
        > > round stones and represents an engineering skill not unlike that of
        > > the Romans or Greeks. It is very straight, and has a remarkably flat
        > > grade, like a railway bed.
        > >
        > > Interestingly, most people today do not even notice it's existence,
        > > because it has the appearance of an old railway bed.
        > >
        > > The history of this area is well documented since whites first set
        > > foot here, around 1600 AD. This roadway appears to predate the
        native
        > > indians.
        > >
        > > The local natives were inquired of by the white settlers, who or
        what
        > > had made this roadway, and none of the natives knew. It had always
        > > been there from their recollection.
        > >
        > > This definitely needs to be explored further.
        > >
        > > I can send more independant info if anyone here is interested. I
        would
        > > be interested in hearing your opinions on what this roadway might
        > > actually be, and what civilization may have created it.
        > >
        > > Regards
        > > Len
        > >
        >
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