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The other side of the water....

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  • George H. Smith
    I quoted this passage from Blaise Pascal (1623-62) in my last Cato essay (#64). I am reprinting it here because it deserves to be better known, even though
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 16, 2013
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      I quoted this passage from Blaise Pascal (1623-62) in my last Cato essay (#64). I am reprinting it here because it deserves to be better known, even though Pascal ended up with anti-libertarian conclusions.

      “Why are you killing me for your own benefit? I am unarmed.”

      “Why, do you not live on the other side of the water? My friend, if you lived on this side, I should be a murderer, but since you live on the other side, I am a brave man and it is right.”

      "Could there be anything more absurd than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of the water, and his prince has picked a quarrel with mine, though I have none with him?”

      Ghs

    • Dan
      While I appreciate and agree with the sentiment of this passage, it s main effect on me was soporific. I wonder if that comes from rendering it in English or
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 18, 2013
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        While I appreciate and agree with the sentiment of this passage, it's main effect on me was soporific. I wonder if that comes from rendering it in English or if that's a quality evinced in the writer's language as well.

        From: George H. Smith <smikro@...>
        To: LL2 <LeftLibertarian2@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2013 12:18 AM
        Subject: [LeftLibertarian2] The other side of the water....

         
        I quoted this passage from Blaise Pascal (1623-62) in my last Cato essay (#64). I am reprinting it here because it deserves to be better known, even though Pascal ended up with anti-libertarian conclusions.

        “Why are you killing me for your own benefit? I am unarmed.”

        “Why, do you not live on the other side of the water? My friend, if you lived on this side, I should be a murderer, but since you live on the other side, I am a brave man and it is right.”

        "Could there be anything more absurd than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of the water, and his prince has picked a quarrel with mine, though I have none with him?”

        Ghs

      • Joshua Katz
        I am unaware of anything the man had to say that impressed me as sophisticated. ... I am unaware of anything the man had to say that impressed me as
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 18, 2013
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          I am unaware of anything the man had to say that impressed me as sophisticated. 

          On Mon, Feb 18, 2013 at 5:54 PM, Dan <dan_ust@...> wrote:
           

          While I appreciate and agree with the sentiment of this passage, it's main effect on me was soporific. I wonder if that comes from rendering it in English or if that's a quality evinced in the writer's language as well.

          From: George H. Smith <smikro@...>
          To: LL2 <LeftLibertarian2@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2013 12:18 AM
          Subject: [LeftLibertarian2] The other side of the water....

           
          I quoted this passage from Blaise Pascal (1623-62) in my last Cato essay (#64). I am reprinting it here because it deserves to be better known, even though Pascal ended up with anti-libertarian conclusions.

          “Why are you killing me for your own benefit? I am unarmed.”

          “Why, do you not live on the other side of the water? My friend, if you lived on this side, I should be a murderer, but since you live on the other side, I am a brave man and it is right.”

          "Could there be anything more absurd than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of the water, and his prince has picked a quarrel with mine, though I have none with him?”

          Ghs


        • Dan
          I recall reading some stuff that seemed to... I also recall some writer saying the French are either followers of Pascal or of Descartes. I forget which
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 18, 2013
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            I recall reading some stuff that seemed to... I also recall some writer saying the French are either followers of Pascal or of Descartes. I forget which writer. It struck me as a cute saying and nothing more. By the way, I've heard Pascal is a mean drunk, so don't ever tell him any of this over a glass of wine.

            From: Joshua Katz <jalankatz@...>
            To: LeftLibertarian2@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 6:21 PM
            Subject: Re: [LeftLibertarian2] The other side of the water....

             
            I am unaware of anything the man had to say that impressed me as sophisticated. 

            On Mon, Feb 18, 2013 at 5:54 PM, Dan <dan_ust@...> wrote:
            While I appreciate and agree with the sentiment of this passage, it's main effect on me was soporific. I wonder if that comes from rendering it in English or if that's a quality evinced in the writer's language as well.

            From: George H. Smith <smikro@...>
            To: LL2 <LeftLibertarian2@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2013 12:18 AM
            Subject: [LeftLibertarian2] The other side of the water....
             
            I quoted this passage from Blaise Pascal (1623-62) in my last Cato essay (#64). I am reprinting it here because it deserves to be better known, even though Pascal ended up with anti-libertarian conclusions.

            “Why are you killing me for your own benefit? I am unarmed.”

            “Why, do you not live on the other side of the water? My friend, if you lived on this side, I should be a murderer, but since you live on the other side, I am a brave man and it is right.”

            "Could there be anything more absurd than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of the water, and his prince has picked a quarrel with mine, though I have none with him?”

            Ghs

          • Joshua Katz
            He may or may not be a mean drunk, but if he is, then saying it has definite painful consequences, and if he isn t, there is no real reward. ... He may or may
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 18, 2013
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              He may or may not be a mean drunk, but if he is, then saying it has definite painful consequences, and if he isn't, there is no real reward.

              On Mon, Feb 18, 2013 at 6:24 PM, Dan <dan_ust@...> wrote:
               

              I recall reading some stuff that seemed to... I also recall some writer saying the French are either followers of Pascal or of Descartes. I forget which writer. It struck me as a cute saying and nothing more. By the way, I've heard Pascal is a mean drunk, so don't ever tell him any of this over a glass of wine.

              From: Joshua Katz <jalankatz@...>
              To: LeftLibertarian2@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 6:21 PM
              Subject: Re: [LeftLibertarian2] The other side of the water....

               
              I am unaware of anything the man had to say that impressed me as sophisticated. 

              On Mon, Feb 18, 2013 at 5:54 PM, Dan <dan_ust@...> wrote:
              While I appreciate and agree with the sentiment of this passage, it's main effect on me was soporific. I wonder if that comes from rendering it in English or if that's a quality evinced in the writer's language as well.

              From: George H. Smith <smikro@...>
              To: LL2 <LeftLibertarian2@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2013 12:18 AM
              Subject: [LeftLibertarian2] The other side of the water....
               
              I quoted this passage from Blaise Pascal (1623-62) in my last Cato essay (#64). I am reprinting it here because it deserves to be better known, even though Pascal ended up with anti-libertarian conclusions.

              “Why are you killing me for your own benefit? I am unarmed.”

              “Why, do you not live on the other side of the water? My friend, if you lived on this side, I should be a murderer, but since you live on the other side, I am a brave man and it is right.”

              "Could there be anything more absurd than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of the water, and his prince has picked a quarrel with mine, though I have none with him?”

              Ghs


            • Dan
              That s a wager I m not willing to take. From: Joshua Katz To: LeftLibertarian2@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 6:29 PM
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 18, 2013
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                That's a wager I'm not willing to take.

                From: Joshua Katz <jalankatz@...>
                To: LeftLibertarian2@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 6:29 PM
                Subject: Re: [LeftLibertarian2] The other side of the water....

                 
                He may or may not be a mean drunk, but if he is, then saying it has definite painful consequences, and if he isn't, there is no real reward.

                On Mon, Feb 18, 2013 at 6:24 PM, Dan <dan_ust@...> wrote:
                 
                I recall reading some stuff that seemed to... I also recall some writer saying the French are either followers of Pascal or of Descartes. I forget which writer. It struck me as a cute saying and nothing more. By the way, I've heard Pascal is a mean drunk, so don't ever tell him any of this over a glass of wine.

                From: Joshua Katz <jalankatz@...>
                To: LeftLibertarian2@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 6:21 PM
                Subject: Re: [LeftLibertarian2] The other side of the water....

                 
                I am unaware of anything the man had to say that impressed me as sophisticated. 

                On Mon, Feb 18, 2013 at 5:54 PM, Dan <dan_ust@...> wrote:
                While I appreciate and agree with the sentiment of this passage, it's main effect on me was soporific. I wonder if that comes from rendering it in English or if that's a quality evinced in the writer's language as well.

                From: George H. Smith <smikro@...>
                To: LL2 <LeftLibertarian2@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2013 12:18 AM
                Subject: [LeftLibertarian2] The other side of the water....
                 
                I quoted this passage from Blaise Pascal (1623-62) in my last Cato essay (#64). I am reprinting it here because it deserves to be better known, even though Pascal ended up with anti-libertarian conclusions.

                “Why are you killing me for your own benefit? I am unarmed.”

                “Why, do you not live on the other side of the water? My friend, if you lived on this side, I should be a murderer, but since you live on the other side, I am a brave man and it is right.”

                "Could there be anything more absurd than that a man has the right to kill me because he lives on the other side of the water, and his prince has picked a quarrel with mine, though I have none with him?”

                Ghs

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