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Prison-break/was [LeftLibertarian2] The Zeitgeist

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  • jeo1@frontier.com
    From: Juan Garofalo To: LeftLibertarian2@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, January 31, 2011 7:45:12 PM Subject: Re: Prison-break/was
    Message 1 of 264 , Feb 2, 2011
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      From: "Juan Garofalo" <juan.g71@...>
      To: LeftLibertarian2@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, January 31, 2011 7:45:12 PM
      Subject: Re: Prison-break/was [LeftLibertarian2] The Zeitgeist

      Well, consider that it's (way) easier to nuke a city than to defend it from that kind of attack...Not a comforting thought, but that's how things stand.

      J.

      REPLY: C'mon. SDI (Star Wars) has been proven to be very economical and efficient. The US has only spent a few hundred billions on it and they almost have drawings made now as to to how it is (supposed) to work :)
    • Dan
      And was the collective punishment never visited upon the authorities? For example, if all students are punishment for the act of one, then why not punish all
      Message 264 of 264 , Feb 7, 2011
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        And was the collective punishment never visited upon the authorities? For example, if all students are punishment for the act of one, then why not punish all teachers for the act of one? I'm not saying I endorse this, but wonder if this has ever been the result...
         
        Regards,
         
        Dan

        From: Dan Clore <clore@...>
        To: LeftLibertarian2@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sun, February 6, 2011 1:23:12 AM
        Subject: Re: Prison-break/was [LeftLibertarian2] The Zeitgeist

        Joshua Katz wrote:
        >
        > By the way, I've seen this used at schools as well.  "If one of you
        > cheats on this exam, you'll all get 0s."  "If one person in this dorm
        >  brings in drugs, you live together, so the rest will know, so you'll
        > all be punished."  A cruel twist was used at a workplace once - when
        > one person stole food from the boss (the workplace had an idiotic "3
        > o'clock rule" which was not
        applied to officers - this person applied
        > it to an officer) the officer punished everyone but the offender.

        Yeah, in my elementary school it was fairly common for teachers who
        didn't know who did something to make us all put our heads on our desks
        until someone narked on the culprit (or more often, the teacher ran out
        of patience and gave up on it). I don't think there was a single time
        that they did this that I even knew who committed these grievous crimes.
        (I wish I'd had the nerve to sit up and say that I didn't do it, didn't
        know who did it, and refused to accept punishment. I'm sure I would have
        really gotten it then, but at least my parents would have taken my side
        -- in first grade I once refused to apologize for something I didn't do,
        and they went and talked to my teacher to explain that I believed I was
        innocent and was standing on principle. Of course, I'd already been
        punished for not apologizing, but anyway at least the teacher understood
        why I thought it was so unfair.)

        --
        Dan Clore

        New book: _Weird Words: A Lovecraftian Lexicon_:
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        Strange pleasures are known to him who flaunts the
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        -- Clark Ashton Smith, "Epigrams and Apothegms"

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