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Re: The war against unpasteurized milk

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  • j. freeman smith
    Good points Jeremy, especially about one-size-fits-all proclamations. State agents dictating to people what the one true dietary school of thought is reminds
    Message 1 of 18 , Apr 30, 2008
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      Good points Jeremy, especially about one-size-fits-all
      proclamations. State agents dictating to people what the one true
      dietary school of thought is reminds me of similar treatment toward
      religion prior to the separation of church and state.

      Oh, and I wouldn't be surprised at all to see some dairy farmers take
      up arms sooner or later, with those guns being aimed at those state
      goone looking to protect corporate dairies from the type of
      competition that threatens their unfortunate business model.

      freeman


      --- In LeftLibertarian2@yahoogroups.com, "Jeremy" <jeremy@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thanks for posting that, Quasibill. As a person who grew up on a
      macrobiotic, organic diet
      > before it was trendy, I'm the first to say that ANY one-size-fits-
      all dictate about health is
      > bound to be incomplete and, ultimately, put people at risk. We
      just don't know everything,
      > and what we do know changes so often. So let people put themselves
      at risk rather than
      > institutions.
      >
      > Remember that this is bigger than just pasteurization, though: ALL
      vegetables and fruits
      > coming into the U.S. from abroad, organic or not, is irradiated.
      Another reason to eat local
      > and from farms you know and trust is that you get food that is
      alive, that hasn't been
      > processed to death. Dead food won't make you sick; it also won't
      make you healthy.
      >
      > - Jeremy
      >
      > P.S. It was heartening to hear somebody talk about this issue as
      worth picking up guns and
      > fighting the power over. Nice to know some things still are.
      >
    • Dan Ust
      ... Regarding live food, my personal stance it s best to consume the food shortly after killing it. Regards, Dan
      Message 2 of 18 , May 5, 2008
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        --- On Wed, 4/30/08, Jeremy <jeremy@...> wrote:

        > Thanks for posting that, Quasibill. As a person who grew up
        > on a macrobiotic, organic diet
        > before it was trendy, I'm the first to say that ANY
        > one-size-fits-all dictate about health is
        > bound to be incomplete and, ultimately, put people at risk.
        > We just don't know everything,
        > and what we do know changes so often. So let people put
        > themselves at risk rather than
        > institutions.
        >
        > Remember that this is bigger than just pasteurization,
        > though: ALL vegetables and fruits
        > coming into the U.S. from abroad, organic or not, is
        > irradiated. Another reason to eat local
        > and from farms you know and trust is that you get food that
        > is alive, that hasn't been
        > processed to death. Dead food won't make you sick; it
        > also won't make you healthy.

        Regarding live food, my personal stance it's best to consume the food shortly after killing it.

        Regards,

        Dan


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