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Academia finally catching up with us?

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  • James Garfield
    STATE OF EXCEPTION is the latest work by Giorgio Agamben, an Italian professor of aesthetics apparently quite popular with the critical theory crowd. The
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 7 3:30 AM
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      STATE OF EXCEPTION is the latest work by Giorgio Agamben, an Italian
      professor of aesthetics apparently quite popular with the "critical
      theory" crowd. The description of the book at Amazon.com makes it
      sound like Robert Higgs's CRISIS AND LEVIATHAN!

      "Two months after the attacks of 9/11, the Bush administration, in
      the midst of what it perceived to be a state of emergency,
      authorized the indefinite detention of noncitizens suspected of
      terrorist activities and their subsequent trials by a military
      commission. Here, distinguished Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben
      uses such circumstances to argue that this unusual extension of
      power, or "state of exception," has historically been an
      underexamined and powerful strategy that has the potential to
      transform democracies into totalitarian states.

      The sequel to Agamben's Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life,
      State of Exception is the first book to theorize the state of
      exception in historical and philosophical context. In Agamben's
      view, the majority of legal scholars and policymakers in Europe as
      well as the United States have wrongly rejected the necessity of
      such a theory, claiming instead that the state of exception is a
      pragmatic question. Agamben argues here that the state of exception,
      which was meant to be a provisional measure, became in the course of
      the twentieth century a normal paradigm of government. Writing
      nothing less than the history of the state of exception in its
      various national contexts throughout Western Europe and the United
      States, Agamben uses the work of Carl Schmitt as a foil for his
      reflections as well as that of Derrida, Benjamin, and Arendt.

      In this highly topical book, Agamben ultimately arrives at original
      ideas about the future of democracy and casts a new light on the
      hidden relationship that ties law to violence."

      I saw the book at the store, and, glancing thru it, didn't notice
      any Higgs citations, so Agamben may have reinvented the wheel here.
      From what I've read, "sovereignty" and "statecraft" are becoming
      popular topics for analysis in academic theory, so we may be seeing
      more and more crossovers with libertarianism.

      Has anyone here read Agamben? Am I just making a mountain out of a
      molehill here?

      --James
    • Kenneth Gregg
      It s the Neo-Morphs! Didn t H.G. Wells write about them in his time traveler novel? :)
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 7 1:23 PM
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        It's the Neo-Morphs! Didn't H.G. Wells write about them in his time
        traveler novel? :)

        http://www.godspy.com/reviews/Crunchy-Cons-An-Interview-with-Rod-Dreher-by-Angelo-Matera.cfm

        Cheers!
        Just Ken
        http://classicalliberalism.blogspot.com/
      • Kenneth Gregg
        I put a short obit on my website, http://classicalliberalism.blogspot.com/ and Chris Sciabarra has done on his
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 20 10:23 AM
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          I put a short obit on my website,
          http://classicalliberalism.blogspot.com/ and Chris Sciabarra has done on
          his http://www.nyu.edu/projects/sciabarra/notablog/archives/001059.html
          and at the Liberty & Power blog: http://hnn.us/blogs/4.html
          He will be missed by many.
          Best to all of you,
          Just Ken
          kgregglv@...
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