Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [IATEFLComputer Sig] Digest Number 349

Expand Messages
  • Lev
    But Vicki - Of course teaching - any teaching but online teaching in particular - inevitable has to be accompanied by testing. Testing is our way to obtain the
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 23, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      But Vicki -

      Of course teaching - any teaching but online teaching in particular -
      inevitable has to be accompanied by testing. Testing is our way to obtain
      the info we need in order to apply corrective procedures, to offer
      appropriate assistance, and to tell our clients how they are progressing. We
      should not test what we've taught, of course :) - but we can avoid testing
      no more than a doctor can avoid measuring a patient's blood pressure after
      two weeks on a new BP control drug.

      And online teaching requires more procedures that are testing or look like
      testing because an online moderator does not get the regular set of f2f
      clues and cues, and needs something to work around it. In this situation,
      testing - or any other tool that provides feedback - has to supply us with
      the otherwise missing feedback.

      Not that this fact can make our learners any happier about excessive
      (compared to f2f) testing. This perception (correct, in many cases) can
      definitely be one of the reasons why people prefer not to enroll in OL. Do
      you know of other reasons? Do you happen to have read any research papers
      dealing with reasons why people decline learning online? I would greatly
      appreciate help in that direction - in the form of both paper titles and
      anecdotal evidence, as I am really keen on learning why.

      Lev

      -----Original Message-----
      From: IATEFLComputerSig@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:IATEFLComputerSig@yahoogroups.com]
      Sent: Monday, June 23, 2003 4:02 PM
      To: IATEFLComputerSig@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [IATEFLComputer Sig] Digest Number 349


      ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor ---------------------~--> Get
      A Free Psychic Reading! Your Online Answer To Life's Important Questions.
      http://us.click.yahoo.com/Lj3uPC/Me7FAA/ySSFAA/3OlolB/TM
      ---------------------------------------------------------------------~->

      To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      IATEFLComputerSig-unsubscribe@egroups.com


      ------------------------------------------------------------------------

      There is 1 message in this issue.

      Topics in this digest:

      1. RE: RE: interactive online marking
      From: "Vicki Hollett" <vicki@...>


      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________

      Message: 1
      Date: Sun, 22 Jun 2003 12:52:03 -0400
      From: "Vicki Hollett" <vicki@...>
      Subject: RE: RE: interactive online marking

      Lev said:
      >>>>>>>>>>I'll tell you where, IMHO, the problem really lies. Learners
      >>>>>>>>>>are
      reluctant
      to enrol in online learning because in many cases they are not after
      knowledge - they are after certification. In regular classroom settings they
      can get away with not knowing certain things; online instruction does not
      let them enjoy this luxury. And even when they need no certification they
      cannot get rid of this alter ego - it's too deep, it's subconscious.

      Oh this is very interesting, Lev. It's not actually certification that most
      of the learners I work with need, but certainly the learning is generally
      just a means to another end. Now what are these 'certain things' we have to
      know when we're learning on-line? Are they vital or is there a way for
      on-line learners to avoid knowing them as well? Not many people like being
      tested. Have on-line courses come to be associated with testing rather than
      teaching?

      When I'm learning in a face-to-face classroom and I hit things I don't
      understand, there are things that might make it easier to cope with
      psychologically:
      * Perhaps someone will see I'm having a problem and come along and help me.
      * The class will move along without me so all might become clear if I can
      just hang on a bit.
      * I can get a sense of how I'm measuring up against other students, so even
      if it's abysmally, it maybe slightly less abysmally than someone else, and
      hence an achievement of sorts.

      I can see how collaborative learning might alleviate some motivational
      problems, but it raises others, and I'm not convinced it will be quite the
      answer folks are hoping for.

      >>>>>>>>>>>>>A live - and very painful - example is a course we tried
      opening last summer...........

      Oh commiserations, Lev - so sad when so much hard work comes to nothing. And
      it's astonishing that you had no take up. I too would be very interested in
      hearing about successful online courses, though unsuccessful ones would be
      interesting too. What makes them work/not work?

      Vicki Hollett





      ________________________________________________________________________
      ________________________________________________________________________



      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


      ---
      Incoming mail is certified Virus Free.
      Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
      Version: 6.0.491 / Virus Database: 290 - Release Date: 18/06/2003


      ---
      Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
      Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
      Version: 6.0.491 / Virus Database: 290 - Release Date: 18/06/2003
    • Sabine Boehm
      Dear Lev and other colleagues I really thought that students wanting a distance-learning course choose it because they cannot attent a normal live course in
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 25, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear Lev and other colleagues

        I really thought that students wanting a distance-learning course choose it
        because they cannot attent a "normal" live course in a group, maybe as they
        live too far away of as the time a "normal" course is offered doesn't suit
        them or takes place too often per week or month etc. Maybe for other
        reasons, too, e.g. they might need more time for solving problems than the
        majority of participants in a group, are too shy to speak in front of
        others etc.

        Also, of course, the credit or certificate awarded by a distance-learning
        course after passing the final tests should be well-known and officially
        recognised, which isn't easy to achieve if you are starting and if you have
        no lobby to support you.

        German univesity language centres have created their own certificate called
        UNIcert and that process has taken quite a while. UNIcert is now on the way
        of gaining recognition even outside Germany but it took some time to
        convince universities here to become UNIcert members. The effort was made
        by the universities themselves that founded professional associations.

        Think of the Open University, how successful they are. But think of the
        support they have received from the government and probably others, too!

        So, it's finding your clients, i.e. Market Research, and getting official
        support, apart from all the professional skills, effort and money invested,
        I believe. Viki mentioned something like that.

        Best wishes and my admiration to Lev and all who have launched such projects.

        Sabine Böhm
        Lecturer in Englsh, Language Centre, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.