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RE: interactive online marking

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  • Sandeha
    Hi all Lev s story raises an interesting quickie. If a lot of money, time and effort is invested in a course and the course fails to take off surely the first
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 23, 2003
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      Hi all

      Lev's story raises an interesting quickie. If a lot of money, time and
      effort is invested in a course and the course fails to take off surely
      the first thing to look at is the quality of the initial market
      research ... what impelled the company to invest so much? If the MR
      suggests that the product will be a dud, then of course you stop right
      there - you don't make it. If MR suggests that it will fly, and it
      doesn't, then the problem lies with the MR. The CEO will probably
      blame the production, and the production techies will probably lambast
      the inert punters in the market. But the blame really belongs with the
      failure of, or lack of investment in, market research.

      I think it's great when companies, (and individuals) have the freedom
      to follow any of the new avenues that the technology permits, but not
      everything that is possible will be popular. At present, asynchronous
      learning systems are very, very useful both in classroom online
      learning programs, (where the teacher is sitting next to a dozen
      students as they work on their terminals) and in distance online
      learning programs. But these scenarios can hardly be compared with
      synchronous learning - even where they use the same technology.

      Synchronous learning, (like the classroom itself) is something that
      some students are trying to get away from ... those who stay in class
      stay for their own good reasons and probably would not be tempted by
      "doing the same things at a distance". Indeed why should they be?
      Isn't it more likely that students who reject the classroom are in fact
      rejecting synchronous learning?

      Of course there are situations where synchronous online learning is
      appropriate, and I can imagine that lecturing across time-zones may be
      a great ego-booster for the lecturer.!. I also have no doubt that the
      'special moments' of a lecture can be just as deeply felt across the
      world as across a theatre ... but marking and giving feedback on
      writing? Developing synchronous marking software certainly sounds like
      an excellent MSc project. Otherwise, the software that Marc is aiming
      at is something I might use with just a student here or there ...
      (0.66% of total feedback time, maybe? When I MUST do a face-to-face
      with a student who cannot be present?) So one suggestion Marc ... get
      your prototype together and then have a word with
      http://www.cict.co.uk/

      If you make it, I'll certainly try it.

      Regards

      Sandeha


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    • Marc Loewenthal
      ... PhotoKina ... with an ... about the ... like a ... somehow get the ... for ... What ... more ... mode? I ... see it ... Thanks for your answer Lev. Don t
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 24, 2003
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        --- In IATEFLComputerSig@yahoogroups.com, Lev <labra@n...> wrote:
        > Hi all!
        >
        > Regarding interactive online marking:
        >
        > I remember that in the late 70s, while reading a report from a
        PhotoKina
        > exhibition in Germany, I came across a description of a binocular
        with an
        > auto-focus device. The author of the review felt rather skeptical
        about the
        > gadget, and commented on it in the following manner: "It sounds
        like a
        > solution looking for its problem."
        >
        > Now that I'm reading about the interactive online marking, I
        somehow get the
        > same feeling. Technologically it is all definitely feasible (Markin
        for
        > asynchronous marking, whiteboards for synch) - but who needs synch?
        What
        > problem does synchronous online marking solve that cannot be solved
        more
        > efficiently and (what's more important) cost-efficiently in asynch
        mode? I
        > keep hearing that there are certain contents and contexts that make
        > synchronous interaction mandatory. Probably so. But I still have to
        see it
        > to believe it.

        Thanks for your answer Lev. Don't worry. I need any input to give me
        an idea of what people have actually done. I have no intention of
        setting up an online teaching course. I myself have reservations
        about how well they work. After all, I've been doing an MSc in
        Multimedia Applications Development, which involves a lot of
        communication via WebCT, which has not always run as smoothly as we
        would have liked. All I'm looking at is the possibility of just
        marking online and nothing else. There are thousands of students all
        over the world who do not have regular access to an experienced
        teacher of English who is also closesly acquainted with EFL exams and
        who knows how to prepare students for composition papers (I
        personally have been an examiner for UCLES/Cambridge ESOL for twelve
        years). The idea is that students would buy online time with the
        teacher and go online just a few times a week when there was some
        work to mark. All I'm interested in finding out is whether the
        interactivity of being online simultaneously is attractive to
        students and will enhance the process of error correction and
        feedback. I want to find out what system is most suitable, indeed if
        there is a suitable system around, and then if teachers and students
        would be interested in using it.

        Marc
      • English Studio
        Well MArc- I am a teacher and I would love to get more involved with online marking !!! Sorry for this late reply Alicia Rey English Studio ARGENTINA
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 20, 2003
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          Well MArc- I am a teacher and I would love to get more involved with online marking !!!
          Sorry for this late reply

          Alicia Rey
          English Studio
          ARGENTINA
          www.aliciarey.com.ar
          www.ingleseninternet.com.ar


          Marc Loewenthal <marcoloe@...> wrote:
          --- In IATEFLComputerSig@yahoogroups.com, Lev <labra@n...> wrote:
          > Hi all!
          >
          > Regarding interactive online marking:
          >
          > I remember that in the late 70s, while reading a report from a
          PhotoKina
          > exhibition in Germany, I came across a description of a binocular
          with an
          > auto-focus device. The author of the review felt rather skeptical
          about the
          > gadget, and commented on it in the following manner: "It sounds
          like a
          > solution looking for its problem."
          >
          > Now that I'm reading about the interactive online marking, I
          somehow get the
          > same feeling. Technologically it is all definitely feasible (Markin
          for
          > asynchronous marking, whiteboards for synch) - but who needs synch?
          What
          > problem does synchronous online marking solve that cannot be solved
          more
          > efficiently and (what's more important) cost-efficiently in asynch
          mode? I
          > keep hearing that there are certain contents and contexts that make
          > synchronous interaction mandatory. Probably so. But I still have to
          see it
          > to believe it.

          Thanks for your answer Lev. Don't worry. I need any input to give me
          an idea of what people have actually done. I have no intention of
          setting up an online teaching course. I myself have reservations
          about how well they work. After all, I've been doing an MSc in
          Multimedia Applications Development, which involves a lot of
          communication via WebCT, which has not always run as smoothly as we
          would have liked. All I'm looking at is the possibility of just
          marking online and nothing else. There are thousands of students all
          over the world who do not have regular access to an experienced
          teacher of English who is also closesly acquainted with EFL exams and
          who knows how to prepare students for composition papers (I
          personally have been an examiner for UCLES/Cambridge ESOL for twelve
          years). The idea is that students would buy online time with the
          teacher and go online just a few times a week when there was some
          work to mark. All I'm interested in finding out is whether the
          interactivity of being online simultaneously is attractive to
          students and will enhance the process of error correction and
          feedback. I want to find out what system is most suitable, indeed if
          there is a suitable system around, and then if teachers and students
          would be interested in using it.

          Marc



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