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Re: Authoring tool

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  • Sergio Mazzarelli
    Dear Lynn, Please accept my apologies. I misunderstood your message. I thought you were asking for others to confirm something you were not sure about. I now
    Message 1 of 33 , Dec 8, 2007
      Dear Lynn,

      Please accept my apologies. I misunderstood your message. I thought
      you were asking for others to confirm something you were not sure
      about. I now realize that you were actually informing others.

      All the best,

      Sergio

      --- In LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com, lynn whitmore
      <lynn@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Sergio
      > I am fully aware that paying a licence obviates the necessity of
      making your resources available but most people I know download the
      free version, and assume that it is free without strings attached.
      > Thanks.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ========================================
      > Message Received: Dec 08 2007, 06:09 PM
      > From: "Sergio Mazzarelli"
      > To: LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com
      > Cc:
      > Subject: [LearningTechnologiesSIG] Re: Authoring tool
      >
      > You wrote: "Just to confirm to use Hot Potatoes you must agree to the
      > terms that you will make any resources you create public on eg a
      website."
      >
      > Well, that is only true if you want to use Hot Potatoes for free. If
      > you pay for a license ($150 for a single user, $427 for 5 users) there
      > is no such obligation. I bought a license so as to create activities
      > that I upload to my college's Moodle site, where they can only be
      > accesses by registered students. The only limitation for this kind of
      > license is that "you cannot produce more than 500 copies of a CD-ROM
      > or DVD-ROM containing Hot Potatoes exercises (for this, you need a
      > Large Publication Licence)."
      >
      > Best,
      >
      > Sergio
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Graham Davies
      You re right, Eric! I am (or rather was) guilty of overusing obvious and obviously . I wrote an 80-page booklet on CALL back in 1982 - my first major
      Message 33 of 33 , Dec 17, 2007
        You're right, Eric! I am (or rather was) guilty of
        overusing "obvious" and "obviously". I wrote an 80-page booklet on
        CALL back in 1982 - my first major published work. It was reviewed
        very positively, apart from one reviewer's comment on my overuse
        of "obvious" and "obviously". Around that time the first
        concordancers and word-frequency counters for microcomputers were
        appearing, so I began to use them to analyse my writings - and I
        still do. Yes, the reviewer was right. I am now a reformed character!

        Regards
        Graham Davies

        --- In LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Baber"
        <Eric@...> wrote:
        >
        > > I'd say "whatever" must (still) be one of the dominant words in
        youth
        > > culture
        >
        > Along with "obviously". Listen to anyone speak nowadays and every
        second
        > sentence seems to contain "obviously". It always makes me want to
        turn to
        > the speaker and say "If it's obvious, why are you saying it?" Does
        that mean
        > I'm getting old and grumpy?
        >
        > :-)
        >
        > Eric
        >
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