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Re: Recording an interview

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  • richardturnbull
    Just to add Ive had fantastic experience with Pamela and have installed it in all our labs. Did a lesson the other day where the students called out to
    Message 1 of 16 , Nov 29, 2007
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      Just to add Ive had fantastic experience with Pamela and have
      installed it in all our labs. Did a lesson the other day where the
      students called out to various companies as part of their research,
      then we analysed the calls after (awesome experience for them to get
      real interaction with native speakers and then the ability to replay
      and analyse it). Pamela has a limit of fifteen minutes, but that is
      more than enough for my students!
      Good luck!
      Richard


      --- In LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com, "Vicky Saumell"
      <vicky.s@...> wrote:
      >
      > Dear colleagues,
      >
      > I am so grateful and amazed at the number of responses for my query!
      >
      > I have not tried any yet but I'm sure I will be able to record my
      interview.
      >
      > Thanks so much for your help!
      >
      >
      >
      > Vicky Saumell
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Eric Baber
      ... students called out to various companies as part of their research, then we analysed the calls after Sounds like a great idea, BUT did the people at the
      Message 2 of 16 , Dec 3, 2007
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        >Did a lesson the other day where the
        students called out to various companies as part of their research,
        then we analysed the calls after

        Sounds like a great idea, BUT did the people at the other end of the line
        know they were being recorded? A major privacy issue here if you're not
        careful I'd say - I for one wouldn't like my phone calls recorded without me
        knowing it...

        Eric
      • Richard Turnbull
        Good point - the way I see it, I doubt there is any law when calling commercial companies, but I would imagine there is with private conversations. An
        Message 3 of 16 , Dec 3, 2007
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          Good point - the way I see it, I doubt there is any law when calling
          commercial companies, but I would imagine there is with private
          conversations. An interesting point to look into though, wouldn't want to
          tread on anyone's toes. I'll look into it, thanks.

          Richard



          From: LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eric Baber
          Sent: 03 December 2007 14:16
          To: LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [LearningTechnologiesSIG] Re: Recording an interview



          >Did a lesson the other day where the
          students called out to various companies as part of their research,
          then we analysed the calls after

          Sounds like a great idea, BUT did the people at the other end of the line
          know they were being recorded? A major privacy issue here if you're not
          careful I'd say - I for one wouldn't like my phone calls recorded without me

          knowing it...

          Eric





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Graham Davies
          Dear All I am pretty sure that you should not record ANYONE without notifying them that they are being recorded. At the very least not to do so is discourteous
          Message 4 of 16 , Dec 4, 2007
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            Dear All

            I am pretty sure that you should not record ANYONE without notifying
            them that they are being recorded. At the very least not to do so is
            discourteous and a breach of privacy. If you archive the recordings
            there are copyright and data protection issues that need to be
            addressed - certainly in the UK. I usually check the JISC legal site
            for information about such issues:
            http://www.jisclegal.ac.uk

            I have found these two JISC documents very useful:

            Casey J. (2004): Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) in networked e-
            learning: a beginners guide for content developers:
            http://www.jisclegal.ac.uk/publications/johncasey_1.htm

            Oppenheim C. (2004): Recent changes to copyright law and the
            implications for FE and HE:
            http://www.jisclegal.ac.uk/publications/copyrightcoppenheim.htm

            You may be surprised by what these two authors say about the current
            restrictions on what you can store at a website - or even on an
            institutional intranet.

            See also this page on data protection at the BBC site:
            http://www.bbc.co.uk/guidelines/editorialguidelines/edguide/thelaw/datap
            rotectiona.shtml
            It mentions sound recordings, but you would probably have to research
            this further.

            I have created a page at the ICT4LT site that outlines the most
            important issues relating to IPR, , with links to many other more
            authoritative sources:
            http://www.ict4lt.org/en/en_copyright.htm

            Regards
            Graham Davies
          • Graham Davies
            I just did a bit more checking on recording interviews. I found useful information at the Oral History website, namely: When an interview is recorded, separate
            Message 5 of 16 , Dec 4, 2007
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              I just did a bit more checking on recording interviews. I found
              useful information at the Oral History website, namely:

              When an interview is recorded, separate copyrights exist in (1) the
              words spoken and (2) the recording itself.

              Initially the owner of the copyright in the words spoken is the
              speaker, while the copyright in the recording belongs to the person
              or organisation which arranged for the recording to be made. UK
              copyright law already covers these issues, so the default situation
              is that the speaker initially has the right to determine what is done
              with his/her recording.

              The Oral History website states:
              "Interviewing people serves very little purpose unless the interviews
              become available for use. It is unethical, and in many cases illegal,
              to use interviews without the informed consent of the interviewee, in
              which the nature of the use or uses is clear and explicit."
              http://www.ohs.org.uk/ethics/

              Regards
              Graham Davies
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