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Teacher training with new technologies

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  • darrenrelliott
    Sorry! This is a repost. I thought for ease of use I should add an appropriate title. I`m really enjoying the discussion so far...I am curious to hear the
    Message 1 of 21 , May 25, 2007
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      Sorry! This is a repost. I thought for ease of use I should add an
      appropriate title.

      I`m really enjoying the discussion so far...I am curious to hear the
      opinions of people out there regarding web 2.0 and teacher training.

      I think that technology has offered a myriad of new options for
      teacher development (if we consider it to be `professional
      improvement` as a teacher - a very loose and questionable definition
      I know), especially in the way it allows previously isolated teachers
      to connect with communities of practice and share ideas, reflect on
      their own work and context, and learn about what else is happening.
      Language teachers work in such a variety of situations and are often
      resonsible to some extent for their own professional growth, and the
      spread of connecting technology seems to make this easier.

      However, I think formalised training - particularly for pre-service
      teachers, might be slightly more problematical to `deliver` through
      the web. Do even the most advanced synchronous applications offer the
      instantaneous and personalised feedback that person to person courses
      can, for example? There is also the question of trainer training, and
      I know that there are courses emerging in online tutoring to address
      this issue.

      All this assumes that `gateway` qualifications are necessary of
      course. Will the standard four week intensive course be rendered
      obsolete by technology?

      Looking forward to hearing from you!

      Darren Elliott
      Nagoya, Japan
    • ict4lt
      Darren writes: However, I think formalised training - particularly for pre-service teachers, might be slightly more problematical to `deliver` through the
      Message 2 of 21 , May 25, 2007
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        Darren writes:
        "However, I think formalised training - particularly for pre-service
        teachers, might be slightly more problematical to `deliver` through
        the web. Do even the most advanced synchronous applications offer the
        instantaneous and personalised feedback that person to person courses
        can, for example?"

        I worked as an ICT trainer under the NOF (New Opportunities Funding)
        initiative in the UK a few years ago. NOF was a well-funded ICT
        training project (230 million pounds of National Lottery money), but
        in many respects it was a disaster and the joke went around that NOF
        stood for "Not Our Fault". I wrote a section on NOF in this document:
        Fitzpatrick A. & Davies G. (eds.) (2003)The Impact of Information and
        Communications Technologies on the teaching of foreign languages and
        on the role of teachers of foreign languages, EC Directorate General
        of Education and Culture. My contribution, relating specifically to
        the UK, is available in HTML format at
        http://www.camsoftpartners.co.uk/docs/ICC_Grahams_Report_Final.htm
        See Section 2.3 regarding NOF. The post-mortem on NOF, which I
        summarise in Section 2.3, is revealing.

        I think Darren is right. My experience of NOF, especially when the
        NOF initiative reached its final few months, was that face-to-
        training was more effective than distance training. A group of us was
        hired as troubleshooters by one training services provider to go into
        schools during the final few months of the initiative and deliver
        face-to-face training in order to get teachers over the final hurdles
        and, in many cases, to fill in huge gaps in their knowledge that had
        not been covered adequately by distance training. The biggest problem
        NOF had to face was that it was assumed that most teachers could
        already use Windows, word-process and browse the Web. Many couldn't.
        This was the kind of training that could only be delivered
        effectively and efficiently face-to-face, and it was not part of NOF.

        This is not to say that online training cannot work. See this course:
        Institute of Education, London University, UK
        Postgraduate Course in Online Education and Training:
        http://www.ioe.ac.uk/english/oet.htm

        See my other publications on this topic:

        Davies G. (2002) "ICT and Modern Foreign Languages: learning
        opportunities and training needs". Available on the Web at:
        http://www.camsoftpartners.co.uk/needs.htm

        Davies G. (2003) "Perspectives on online training initiatives". In
        Felix U. (ed.) (2003) Language learning online: towards best
        practice, Lisse: Swets & Zeitlinger.

        Graham Davies
        Emeritus Professor of CALL
      • Dennis Newson
        Darren and Graham, Excuse me for following a question with a question. Graham explains that the one of the main reasons for the failure of the project he
        Message 3 of 21 , May 25, 2007
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          Darren and Graham,

          Excuse me for following a question with a question. Graham explains that the
          one of the main reasons for the failure of the project he describes was that
          many of the teachers could not use Windows. Surely, though (I'm thinking of
          private firms that deliver online training courses) aren't there examples
          now of successful online training courses?

          Dennis


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Dan Craig
          Hi Darren, I ll pick up on the same paragraph that Graham did, but at a slightly different angle. However, I think formalised training - particularly for
          Message 4 of 21 , May 25, 2007
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            Hi Darren,

            I'll pick up on the same paragraph that Graham did, but at a slightly
            different angle.

            "However, I think formalised training - particularly for pre-service
            teachers, might be slightly more problematical to `deliver` through
            the web. Do even the most advanced synchronous applications offer the
            instantaneous and personalised feedback that person to person courses
            can, for example?"

            The problem is that personalized feedback is elusive in many (if not most)
            face-to-face (f2f) courses. The lines of communication are tapered my the
            amount of classroom time available. Students and teachers are running from
            one class/meeting to the next leaving little time to connect. Conversations
            not directly with the instructor float into the ether.

            While I am not saying that all online courses provide more personalized
            feedback, the attributes of the asynchronous technologies employed
            (discussion forums, email, blogs, etc.) leave a trail for teachers to
            follow. These can be reviewed by teachers and responded to at their
            convenience. This trail can make it easier to discern what problems
            students are having and therefore easier to provide personalized feedback.

            Shifting this back to Web 2.0 technologies. The beauty of Web 2.0 is the
            emphasis not only on read, but also WRITE. You are getting an incredible
            amount of feedback on/from your students through their interactions with
            you, other students, the public (if it's open) AND the content. Given the
            ability and time to do so, this information can be used to give wonderful,
            personalized feedback.

            Lastly, there's no reason to say that f2f classes can't benefit from Web 2.0
            technology. Blend it and drink in the benefits :-)

            Dan
          • ict4lt
            There are plenty of online training courses, but the teachers that I was dealing with under the NOF initative were mainly middle-aged female language teachers
            Message 5 of 21 , May 25, 2007
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              There are plenty of online training courses, but the teachers that I
              was dealing with under the NOF initative were mainly middle-aged
              female language teachers in secondary schools in the UK, many of whom
              were absolutely terrified of computers - and I'm not being ageist or
              sexist; that's just the way things are in the UK. Using ICT in
              teaching is mandatory under the UK National Curriculum and teachers
              don't have a choice not to use ICT. The National Curriculum website
              states:

              "As a general requirement, teachers should provide pupils with
              opportunities to apply and develop their ICT capability in all
              subjects (except physical education and the non-core foundation
              subjects at key stage 1). For each subject, these translate into
              specific, statutory requirements to use ICT in subject teaching."

              Training teachers like those that I was dealing with solely via an
              online course would not have worked. They needed a lot of help in the
              early stages - and often in the later stages too.

              These are typical general ICT courses:

              The European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL):
              http://www.ecdl.co.uk

              The ECDL for Education, which is designed specifically to help
              teachers, support staff and ICT coordinators develop practical
              computing skills for teaching and learning in the classroom and leads
              to an internationally recognised level of certification:
              http://www.educatorsecdl.com

              The above are usually tied in with local learning centres, such as
              the Learndirect network, and are ideally not delivered 100% online:
              http://www.learndirect.co.uk

              When we set up the ICT4LT site, we had to accept that teachers would
              not be able to benefit from the site until they had followed an
              introductory face-to-face course covering at the very least: How to
              use Windows, a word-processor, a browser and email software. See the
              English language version of the ICT4LT homepage under the
              heading "Entry level":
              http://www.ict4lt.org

              Regards
              Graham Davies
              Emeritus Professor of CALL
            • Sheila
              If you are interested in succesful ICT in the classroom courses look at the consultants-e website their course has just won an ELTON. I admit to a connection
              Message 6 of 21 , May 25, 2007
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                If you are interested in succesful ICT in the classroom courses look
                at the consultants-e website their course has just won an ELTON.

                I admit to a connection as I teach on one of their courses and
                feedback is fast and personal.

                Sheila

                --- In LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com, "darrenrelliott"
                <darrenrelliott@...> wrote:
                >
                > Sorry! This is a repost. I thought for ease of use I should add an
                > appropriate title.
                >
                > I`m really enjoying the discussion so far...I am curious to hear
                the
                > opinions of people out there regarding web 2.0 and teacher training.
                >
                > I think that technology has offered a myriad of new options for
                > teacher development (if we consider it to be `professional
                > improvement` as a teacher - a very loose and questionable
                definition
                > I know), especially in the way it allows previously isolated
                teachers
                > to connect with communities of practice and share ideas, reflect on
                > their own work and context, and learn about what else is happening.
                > Language teachers work in such a variety of situations and are
                often
                > resonsible to some extent for their own professional growth, and
                the
                > spread of connecting technology seems to make this easier.
                >
                > However, I think formalised training - particularly for pre-service
                > teachers, might be slightly more problematical to `deliver` through
                > the web. Do even the most advanced synchronous applications offer
                the
                > instantaneous and personalised feedback that person to person
                courses
                > can, for example? There is also the question of trainer training,
                and
                > I know that there are courses emerging in online tutoring to
                address
                > this issue.
                >
                > All this assumes that `gateway` qualifications are necessary of
                > course. Will the standard four week intensive course be rendered
                > obsolete by technology?
                >
                > Looking forward to hearing from you!
                >
                > Darren Elliott
                > Nagoya, Japan
                >
              • darren elliott
                Thanks to everyone so far for the comments - it`s very interesting to hear of real successes and failures... However, I think formalised training -
                Message 7 of 21 , May 26, 2007
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                  Thanks to everyone so far for the comments - it`s very interesting to hear of real successes and failures...

                  "However, I think formalised training - particularly for pre-service
                  teachers, might be slightly more problematical to `deliver` through
                  the web. Do even the most advanced synchronous applications offer the
                  instantaneous and personalised feedback that person to person courses
                  can, for example?"

                  Dan wrote;
                  "The problem is that personalized feedback is elusive in many (if not most)
                  face-to-face (f2f) courses. The lines of communication are tapered my the
                  amount of classroom time available. Students and teachers are running from
                  one class/meeting to the next leaving little time to connect. Conversations
                  not directly with the instructor float into the ether.

                  While I am not saying that all online courses provide more personalized
                  feedback, the attributes of the asynchronous technologies employed
                  (discussion forums, email, blogs, etc.) leave a trail for teachers to
                  follow. These can be reviewed by teachers and responded to at their
                  convenience. This trail can make it easier to discern what problems
                  students are having and therefore easier to provide personalized feedback."

                  Both these points are very valid, and the `trail` in particular is an advantage that online has over f2f. For teachers `in the field` who have attained a basic level of expertise (whatever that might be!) Web 2.0 may perhaps offer better options than gathering in a draughty room to read photocopies, or trying to catch one another for harried feedback.....

                  However, for pre-service teachers, I`m still not sure that online can beat the spontaneity of f2f training in microteaching skills and techniques as they come up. In my own experience, trainee teachers often need and expect assitance step by step in preparing lessons - and if we as trainers are able to step back and `micromodel` an activity, or have the teacher demonstrate what they are trying to do, the instantaneous and focused interaction can be a very efficient learning experience. I suppose that we could attempt to replicate this with second life, video conferencing or the like....but I am wary of crossing that line between using technology and being used by technology.

                  My experience with blended learning (as an MA student) was not especially exciting, but I see the potential of VLE`s. I`d be interested to hear your take on linking web 2.0 technology and f2f.

                  Darren Elliott,
                  Nagoya, Japan


                  ---------------------------------
                  Yahoo! Answers - Got a question? Someone out there knows the answer. Tryit now.

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Gladys Baya
                  Hi! I m mostly a lurker here, but this discussion has forced me to speak up! Thanks! I believe online training can be a great tool, provided learners meet
                  Message 8 of 21 , May 26, 2007
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                    Hi!

                    I'm mostly a lurker here, but this discussion "has forced" me to speak
                    up! Thanks!

                    I believe online training can be a great tool, provided learners meet
                    certain minimum standards (Web browsing, understanding how links work,
                    file saving, and posting to a forum are the first things that come to
                    my mind). There's no pint in trying to learn to do other things when
                    all tools are bound to make use of these starting points, and trying
                    to learn these online can be quite frustrating.

                    Beyond that first stage, my feeling is that a blended course offers
                    the best options, but a totally online course can certainly serve its
                    purposes very well!

                    Having tried the 3 options (f2f, online and blended) for teacher
                    training (mostly in the area of technology integration, but also in
                    other areas of methodology), this is my humble opinion, at least!

                    BTW, Martin Holmes once told me "you cannot force anyone to integrate
                    technology into their teaching", and I've come to agree with him. I
                    wonder who had the idea of making techno integration compulsory
                    without training teachers enough at first! Great way to encourage
                    technophobia, I'd say...

                    Gladys

                    --- In LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com, "ict4lt" <ict4lt@...>
                    wrote:
                    ...Using ICT in teaching is mandatory under the UK National Curriculum
                    and teachers don't have a choice not to use ICT. ...
                    ...
                    Training teachers like those that I was dealing with solely via an
                    online course would not have worked. They needed a lot of help in the
                    early stages - and often in the later stages too.
                    ...
                  • ict4lt
                    Gladys wrote: I believe online training can be a great tool, provided learners meet certain minimum standards (Web browsing, understanding how links work,
                    Message 9 of 21 , May 27, 2007
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                      Gladys wrote:

                      "I believe online training can be a great tool, provided learners
                      meet certain minimum standards (Web browsing, understanding how links
                      work, file saving, and posting to a forum are the first things that
                      come to my mind). There's no point in trying to learn to do other
                      things when all tools are bound to make use of these starting points,
                      and trying to learn these online can be quite frustrating."

                      My reply:
                      Absolutely! File management in Windows is always one of the areas
                      that newcomers to ICT find confusing. I have found that dedicating at
                      least one long session to file management early on in a training
                      course pays dividends.

                      Gladys wrote:
                      "Beyond that first stage, my feeling is that a blended course offers
                      the best options…"

                      My reply:
                      This is what I believe too. My wife followed a blended course in The
                      Open University (UK) in the 1970s and 1980s. There was regular weekly
                      contact with tutors by telephone and face-to-face, students met with
                      peers once a month at a local college, and there was a one-week
                      annual summer school. Most of the course consisted of printed
                      materials (of very high quality) sent by post. The only technologies
                      widely available at that time were radio, TV, long-playing records
                      (for the music element of the course) and audiocassettes. It worked
                      for my wife. My wife started with zero educational qualifications –
                      not even a school-leaving certificate – and ended up with a good
                      honours degree. I think the OU is still offering blended courses,
                      using new technologies such as its own Lyceum audio-graphic
                      conferencing system, Moodle and FlashMeeting. The OU is always slow
                      to harness new technologies, mainly for political reasons, i.e.
                      the "inclusivity" thing: the crofter in the Highlands, people on low
                      incomes who can't afford new technologies, and "lifers" in prison
                      (some of whom have ended up with OU PhDs). Only when a new technology
                      reaches the masses does the OU introduce it on its courses.

                      Just an afterthought re the NOF initiative: This appeared in one of
                      the OFSTED (Office for Standards in Education)reports on the
                      successes and failures of NOF:
                      "Many teachers have found online support to be unsatisfactory. This
                      was usually because access was unreliable or because mentors were
                      dealing with too many teachers and their responses were therefore
                      often infrequent, shallow or unhelpful. Successful online mentoring
                      operated at ratios of under 30 teachers to each mentor."

                      Gladys wrote:
                      BTW, Martin Holmes once told me "you cannot force anyone to integrate
                      technology into their teaching", and I've come to agree with him. I
                      wonder who had the idea of making techno integration compulsory
                      without training teachers enough at first! Great way to encourage
                      technophobia, I'd say..."

                      My reply:
                      Martin said that to me too, and I agreed with him. Yes, making ICT
                      compulsory for teachers was a daft idea. It emanated from the
                      Department for Education and Skills (DfES). I heard from a journalist
                      friend that one of the reasons why the British government takes this
                      line on ICT and spends vast amounts of money on educational websites
                      (many of which have taken nosedives) is that Tony Blair is himself a
                      technophobe and has bent over backwards trying to prove that,
                      contrary to the rumours, he really likes technology. This has opened
                      the floodgates for the nerds that surround him. What say you, Gordon
                      Brown?

                      Regards
                      Graham Davies
                      Emeritus Professor of CALL
                    • edgarlibardo
                      Dear Sheila You are right. Nothing is particularly hard if it is divided into small achievalbe steps. Libardo: http://360.yahoo.com/edgarlibardo best regards
                      Message 10 of 21 , May 27, 2007
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                        Dear Sheila

                        You are right. Nothing is particularly hard if it is divided into
                        small achievalbe steps.

                        Libardo: http://360.yahoo.com/edgarlibardo

                        best regards

                        --- In LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com, "Sheila"
                        <sheilavine@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > If you are interested in succesful ICT in the classroom courses look
                        > at the consultants-e website their course has just won an ELTON.
                        >
                        > I admit to a connection as I teach on one of their courses and
                        > feedback is fast and personal.
                        >

                        >
                        > --- In LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com, "darrenrelliott"
                        > <darrenrelliott@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Sorry! This is a repost. I thought for ease of use I should add an
                        > > appropriate title.
                        > >
                        > > I`m really enjoying the discussion so far...I am curious to hear
                        > the
                        > > opinions of people out there regarding web 2.0 and teacher training.
                        > >
                        > > I think that technology has offered a myriad of new options for
                        > > teacher development (if we consider it to be `professional
                        > > improvement` as a teacher - a very loose and questionable
                        > definition
                        > > I know), especially in the way it allows previously isolated
                        > teachers
                        > > to connect with communities of practice and share ideas, reflect on
                        > > their own work and context, and learn about what else is happening.
                        > > Language teachers work in such a variety of situations and are
                        > often
                        > > resonsible to some extent for their own professional growth, and
                        > the
                        > > spread of connecting technology seems to make this easier.
                        > >
                        > > However, I think formalised training - particularly for pre-service
                        > > teachers, might be slightly more problematical to `deliver` through
                        > > the web. Do even the most advanced synchronous applications offer
                        > the
                        > > instantaneous and personalised feedback that person to person
                        > courses
                        > > can, for example? There is also the question of trainer training,
                        > and
                        > > I know that there are courses emerging in online tutoring to
                        > address
                        > > this issue.
                        > >
                        > > All this assumes that `gateway` qualifications are necessary of
                        > > course. Will the standard four week intensive course be rendered
                        > > obsolete by technology?
                        > >
                        > > Looking forward to hearing from you!
                        > >
                        > > Darren Elliott
                        > > Nagoya, Japan
                        > >
                        >
                      • Michael Vallance
                        The discussions over the weekend regarding teacher training and task design have been, for me at least, particularly interesting. Have they strayed beyond the
                        Message 11 of 21 , May 27, 2007
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                          The discussions over the weekend regarding teacher training and task design have been, for
                          me at least, particularly interesting. Have they strayed beyond the call for a Web 2.0
                          definition or an in-depth discussion on Web 2.0? Personally, I don't think so. From my
                          research, Task Design that considers multiliteracies and multimodality is at the core of
                          `informed' ICT adoption. Initial teacher training is only the beginning. It is important that
                          teachers continue their professional development, ideally supported by their employer. I have
                          read the insightful comments from Graham Davies and Steve McCarty, and thank them for
                          their contributions. My suggestions for those who wish to `teach' using these social
                          communication tools is to try them yourself: first as a learner (Polish?); second as a teacher/
                          facilitator in a low stakes environment. All experiences will be unique to your situation:
                          yourself, your students, your resources. The next big question I am now grappling with is,
                          How does one assess students' work in a Web 2.0 world? As one colleague said to me, How
                          can you assess 10 Podcasts and reliably state which has more worth than another? Assuming
                          of course that you are teaching a course that requires formal assessment. Maybe this issue is
                          for another thread, another time. Thank you.
                          Michael V.
                        • Gary Motteram
                          Thanks Michael for your comments and others, too, on the nature of Web 2.0, social computing, teacher education and now assessment; an enormous range of topics
                          Message 12 of 21 , May 28, 2007
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                            Thanks Michael for your comments and others, too, on the nature of Web 2.0, social computing, teacher education and now assessment; an enormous range of topics :-)

                            It seems to me that we are still at the very beginnings of this topic;
                            we are still working our way towards a definition of Web 2.0 and at
                            the same time trying to understand what this means, if anything, for
                            language teaching and language teacher education. Perhaps it's too
                            early in out use of these tools for us to make these connections clear.

                            Web 2.0 is often linked to the term social computing and this seems to
                            me to be at the core of what is being achieved by our students being
                            online and exploring the social world that lies beyond the classroom.
                            The internet and other tools also help to bring that social world
                            back into the physical classroom via tools like the interactive
                            whiteboard. This is another kind of blended learning, to pick up
                            a term that has also been used here.

                            While I don't want to stop the discussion that has just started, I
                            feel that it is in order to thank our discussants: Michael Coghlan,
                            Steve McCarty and Michael Vallance for setting up the topic and who
                            have ably stimulated the discussion during this week. I would also like to thank all the others who have contributed and read.

                            However, for my own part I would hope that you continue to explore the
                            topic and will happily moderate further contributions.

                            Cheers

                            Gary




                            --- In LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Vallance"
                            <michael@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > The discussions over the weekend regarding teacher training and task
                            design have been, for
                            > me at least, particularly interesting. Have they strayed beyond the
                            call for a Web 2.0
                            > definition or an in-depth discussion on Web 2.0? Personally, I don't
                            think so. From my
                            > research, Task Design that considers multiliteracies and
                            multimodality is at the core of
                            > `informed' ICT adoption. Initial teacher training is only the
                            beginning. It is important that
                            > teachers continue their professional development, ideally supported
                            by their employer. I have
                            > read the insightful comments from Graham Davies and Steve McCarty,
                            and thank them for
                            > their contributions. My suggestions for those who wish to `teach'
                            using these social
                            > communication tools is to try them yourself: first as a learner
                            (Polish?); second as a teacher/
                            > facilitator in a low stakes environment. All experiences will be
                            unique to your situation:
                            > yourself, your students, your resources. The next big question I am
                            now grappling with is,
                            > How does one assess students' work in a Web 2.0 world? As one
                            colleague said to me, How
                            > can you assess 10 Podcasts and reliably state which has more worth
                            than another? Assuming
                            > of course that you are teaching a course that requires formal
                            assessment. Maybe this issue is
                            > for another thread, another time. Thank you.
                            > Michael V.
                            >
                          • Gavin Dudeney
                            [ apologies for cross-posting ] Introduction The Consultants-E are proud to host the first Annual Second Life Language Teaching Colloquium (SLanguages ) 2007
                            Message 13 of 21 , May 28, 2007
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                              [ apologies for cross-posting ]



                              Introduction

                              The Consultants-E are proud to host the first Annual Second Life Language
                              Teaching Colloquium (SLanguages ) 2007 on Saturday June 23rd on the island
                              of EduNation in Second Life. The aim of this event is to bring together
                              practitioners working (or planning to work) in language education in Second
                              Life, for a series of presentations followed by a panel discussion.





                              Rationale

                              The explosive growth in Second Life over the past few months has brought
                              more and more educators in-world and we are now seeing an increasing number
                              of language educators experimenting with the environment and trying to work
                              towards ideas for exploiting it in their teaching. However, recent
                              conversations on lists such as the Second Life Languages one have thrown up
                              some serious queries and debates on the effectiveness of such environments
                              and have demonstrated that more discussion and experimentation are needed in
                              order to fully get to grips with 'Web 3-D'. Additionally, the entrance of
                              larger organisations such as LanguageLab and the British Council has
                              increased interest in Multi-User Learner Environments and has started off
                              the debate on a possible roadmap for future work in-world.



                              Through the course of the event, we hope to tease out some of the major
                              issues and considerations in delivering language education in Second Life,
                              and work towards some basic guidelines for best practice in the area.





                              Location

                              The event will take place in the Seminar Area of EduNation, the
                              Consultants-E sim in Second Life. You can find the island using the Search
                              facility in Second Life, or by following this URL: http://tinyurl.com/yehbto





                              Technical Details

                              The seminar will use Second Life as its primary medium, but will also make
                              use of a Ventrilo voice server. In order to hear the presenters and
                              participate, you will need to download and configure the Ventrilo voice
                              client. This can be downloaded from the following site:
                              http://www.ventrilo.com/download.php . Details of how to connect to the
                              EduNation Ventrilo server will be given nearer the day, once the approved
                              list of participants has been finalised.





                              Sign-Ups

                              The event has a limit of 50 participants, so you are encouraged to sign up
                              early to avoid disappointment. You can sign up for the event in-world by
                              IMing Dudeney Ge, or by sending an email to
                              gavin.dudeney@... stating your real name and your SL avatar
                              name. If sign-ups exceed 50, we will put people on a waiting list and they
                              will be moved into the participant list as and when spaces become available.





                              Archiving

                              The talk visuals and audio streams will be archived and made available on
                              the island as soon as possible after the event. If you are unable to attend,
                              we will keep these materials available for a while after the event so that
                              you can catch up with what we hope are going to be stimulating and diverse
                              presentations from around the globe.





                              Programme

                              All times are GMT (CET in round brackets) [ SL in square brackets ]



                              Full abstracts will follow shortly...



                              08:45 - 09:00 (10:45 - 11:00) [01:45 - 02:00]

                              Introduction from Gavin Dudeney, Project Director of The Consultants-E



                              09:00 - 09:45 (11:00 - 11:45) [02:00 - 02:45]

                              Paul Preibisch & Kip Boahn (Korea)

                              The English Village Project



                              10:00 - 10:45 (12:00 - 12:45) [03:00 - 03:45]

                              Hugh O'Donnell

                              The Scottish Secondary Sector



                              11:00 - 11:45 (13:00 - 13:45) [04:00 - 04:45]

                              Nik Peachey
                              Materials Design in SL (LanguageLab)



                              11:45 - 12:15 (13:45 - 14:15) [04:45 - 05:15]

                              Poster Presentations



                              12:15 - 13:15 (14:15 - 15:15) [05:15 - 06:15]

                              Lunch



                              13:15 - 14:00 (15:15 - 16:00) [06:15 - 07:00]

                              Birdie Newborn

                              Language Inside & Outside the Classroom



                              14:15 - 15:00 (16:15 - 17:00) [07:15 - 08:00]

                              Graham Stanley & Kyle Mawer

                              Tales of Mystery, Imagination & Education in the Teen Grid



                              15:15 - 16:30 (17:15 - 18:30) [08:15 - 09:30]

                              Panel Discussion







                              Poster Presentations

                              The poster presentation session is for those attendees who are working in
                              language education in Second Life, but are not speaking at the event. If you
                              would like to display a poster about any SL work you are doing (with
                              optional landmark and notecard), please contact Dudeney Ge in-world to
                              transfer full permission versions of the texture, landmark and notecard. Our
                              staff will take care of putting your poster together and displaying it in
                              the Social Area on the island.



                              If you do decide to prepare a poster presentation it would be valuable if
                              you could be with your poster through the duration of the poster session to
                              talk to interested participants.





                              Lunch Break

                              The lunch break is not only an opportunity to take a break from the
                              conference, should you need one, but also a chance to chat to the other
                              participants and to enjoy the event in a more relaxed social environment.
                              You are encouraged to break off into groups and explore the themes of the
                              day with like-minded colleagues.





                              Q & A

                              The Q & A will give each presenter 5 minutes to summarise their thoughts on
                              the day's discussions and presentations before moving on to open the debate
                              up to the audience for approximately 45 minutes. Questions from the audience
                              will be fielded by Dudeney Ge and directed to appropriate presenters as they
                              are submitted. Please note that questions must be sent to the moderator and
                              not directly spoken in public chat.





                              Advertising

                              Please note that this is not a commercial venture, and whilst reference to
                              actual in-world locations and events, as well as RL organisations and work
                              are fine in the context of the event, presentations have been designed to be
                              informative rather than commercial. Speakers may, of course, hand out
                              notecards, landmarks and free SL gifts as they choose.





                              Gavin





                              Gavin Dudeney - Project Director, The Consultants-E

                              c/ Ceramica 54, 08035 Barcelona, Spain

                              Tel: +34 93 427 4240 | +44 20 7193 0770

                              <http://www.theconsultants-e.com/> http://www.theconsultants-e.com



                              Winners, 2007 British Council ELTON awards - <http://tinyurl.com/3e2c54>
                              http://tinyurl.com/3e2c54

                              Owners of the Second Life sim EduNation - <http://tinyurl.com/yehbto>
                              http://tinyurl.com/yehbto

                              Sponsors of the 2006 UK Moodle Conference - <http://www.moodlemoot.org/>
                              http://www.moodlemoot.org



                              CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLAIMER NOTICE

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                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Graham Davies
                              It ain t all good news! Read this online article in The Observer, UK: Enough! The Briton who is challenging the Web s endless cacophony by David Smith,
                              Message 14 of 21 , May 29, 2007
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                                It ain't all good news!

                                Read this online article in The Observer, UK:
                                "Enough! The Briton who is challenging the Web's endless cacophony"
                                by
                                David Smith, Technology Correspondent
                                Sunday, 29 April 2007

                                It focuses on a book by Andrew Keen, entitled "The Cult of the
                                Amateur", which is a damning condemnation of Web 2.0 and its
                                manifestations:

                                http://observer.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,,2068107,00.html#article_continue

                                Here is a flavour of what the article is about:

                                "Keen, who still lives in California and works in technology,
                                questions the euphoria surrounding the rise of citizen journalism,
                                online communities such as MySpace and user-generated websites
                                including online encyclopedia Wikipedia and video-sharing site
                                YouTube."
                              • james frith
                                Whilst on the subject of Second Life, there is a television programme on in the UK (sorry those of you not in UK!) at 7pm on Friday on BBC2 about Second Life.
                                Message 15 of 21 , May 29, 2007
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                                  Whilst on the subject of Second Life, there is a television programme on in the UK (sorry those of you not in UK!) at 7pm on Friday on BBC2 about Second Life. It is a Money Programme special and so I presume will look at the businesses being set up there as opposed to the educational opportunities it offers, but might be of interest.

                                  James Frith
                                • Gavin Dudeney
                                  James, Shame I can t see it here... but even one programme concentrating on business would be a relief after the majority of recent television has concentrated
                                  Message 16 of 21 , May 29, 2007
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                                    James,



                                    Shame I can't see it here... but even one programme concentrating on
                                    business would be a relief after the majority of recent television has
                                    concentrated on sex...



                                    Let us know if it was any good...



                                    Gavin







                                    Gavin Dudeney - Project Director, The Consultants-E

                                    c/ Ceramica 54, 08035 Barcelona, Spain

                                    Tel: +34 93 427 4240 | +44 20 7193 0770

                                    <http://www.theconsultants-e.com/> http://www.theconsultants-e.com



                                    Winners, 2007 British Council ELTON awards - <http://tinyurl.com/3e2c54>
                                    http://tinyurl.com/3e2c54

                                    Owners of the Second Life sim EduNation - <http://tinyurl.com/yehbto>
                                    http://tinyurl.com/yehbto

                                    Sponsors of the 2006 UK Moodle Conference - <http://www.moodlemoot.org/>
                                    http://www.moodlemoot.org



                                    CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLAIMER NOTICE

                                    This email and any attachments are private and confidential. It is intended
                                    for the recipient only. If you are not the intended recipient, any use,
                                    disclosure, distribution, printing or copying of this email is unauthorised.
                                    You may not read, use or take any action in reliance on it. If you have
                                    received this email in error please notify the sender immediately by
                                    replying to this email and permanently delete the email from your computer.
                                    The contents of any attachments to this e-mail may contain software viruses
                                    which could damage your own computer system. While we have taken every
                                    reasonable precaution to minimise this risk, we cannot accept liability for
                                    any damage which you sustain as a result of software viruses. You should
                                    carry out your own virus checks before opening any attachments.



                                    From: LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com
                                    [mailto:LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of james frith
                                    Sent: 29 May 2007 18:50
                                    To: LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [LearningTechnologiesSIG] SLanguages 2007



                                    Whilst on the subject of Second Life, there is a television programme on in
                                    the UK (sorry those of you not in UK!) at 7pm on Friday on BBC2 about Second
                                    Life. It is a Money Programme special and so I presume will look at the
                                    businesses being set up there as opposed to the educational opportunities it
                                    offers, but might be of interest.

                                    James Frith





                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Geoff Taylor
                                    Many thanks for this heads up, James! ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    Message 17 of 21 , May 29, 2007
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                                      Many thanks for this heads up, James!

                                      On 29 May 2007, at 17:49, james frith wrote:

                                      >> Whilst on the subject of Second Life, there is a television
                                      >> programme on in the UK (sorry those of you not in UK!) at 7pm on
                                      >> Friday on BBC2 about Second Life.


                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Gary Motteram
                                      Hi All, it may be that this is one of those programmes that is available as a vodcast, it would seem an obvious candidate. The BBC are increasingly doing this.
                                      Message 18 of 21 , May 29, 2007
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                                        Hi All, it may be that this is one of those programmes that is
                                        available as a vodcast, it would seem an obvious candidate. The BBC
                                        are increasingly doing this.

                                        Gary


                                        --- In LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com, "Gavin Dudeney"
                                        <gavin.dudeney@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > James,
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > Shame I can't see it here... but even one programme concentrating on
                                        > business would be a relief after the majority of recent television has
                                        > concentrated on sex...
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > Let us know if it was any good...
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > Gavin
                                        >
                                        > Gavin Dudeney - Project Director, The Consultants-E
                                        >
                                      • Ruth Vilmi
                                        Warm greetings from tropical Finland (a sweltering 28.4C today)! I ve been following the recent discussions with great interest, though I ve been reluctant to
                                        Message 19 of 21 , May 29, 2007
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                                          Warm greetings from tropical Finland (a sweltering 28.4C today)!

                                          I've been following the recent discussions with great interest, though
                                          I've been reluctant to join in before now. Many thanks to the
                                          contributors for their excellent postings, especially Steve, Graham,
                                          Michael and Gary.

                                          In reply to Darren, I'd like to say that it's really quite easy to give
                                          feedback on line, through forums, chats and programs like Skype and
                                          Messenger, but it's very demanding for the teacher. Questions can often
                                          be answered by other students as well as by a number of teachers in
                                          online classes.

                                          The 'problem' of feedback can be both personal and instantaneous largely
                                          by teachers forming (online)networks or joining communities. As an
                                          example, I'd like to mention the great work being done by the Webheads,
                                          initiated by Vance Stevens. They meet regularly online, trying out new
                                          technology together, learning from each other, training professional and
                                          trainee teachers globally, giving courses, running online conferences
                                          and all free of charge. Read more about the Webheads and how to join them:
                                          http://www.geocities.com/vance_stevens/papers/evonline2002/webheads.htm
                                          I still believe that the ideal world of teaching might become real if
                                          there were more communities of practice like this, in spite of what
                                          Andrew Keen says in his book "The Cult of the Amateur". Are we not all
                                          amateurs in this time of fast-moving technology? If we specialise it can
                                          be in a limited area only - there's simply too much happening and
                                          changing all the time to keep up with it all.

                                          Secondly, I know that studying ICT is compulsory in English schools, but
                                          my attempts to interest trainee teachers in Britain in my online
                                          language course, the International Writing Exchange, have always failed
                                          because students are not given any credits for doing teaching practice
                                          on line! There seem to be very few, if any, online teaching practice
                                          components for language teacher trainees at British universities yet.
                                          Are there any elsewhere? Norwegian teacher trainees joined me about ten
                                          years ago, and were very active. Finally, now I have teacher trainees
                                          from Germany too, thanks to the persistence of Bernd Morlock from
                                          Frankfurt. The British teacher who sometimes joins us is still
                                          struggling to find a way to give his students credit for online learning.

                                          I'll follow the progress in this area of online teacher training and
                                          hope to keep in touch with those of you who are interested.

                                          Ruth Vilmi


                                          ict4lt wrote:
                                          > Darren writes:
                                          > "However, I think formalised training - particularly for pre-service
                                          > teachers, might be slightly more problematical to `deliver` through
                                          > the web. Do even the most advanced synchronous applications offer the
                                          > instantaneous and personalised feedback that person to person courses
                                          > can, for example?"
                                          >
                                          >

                                          --

                                          Ruth Vilmi
                                          Ruth Vilmi Online Education Ltd
                                          E-learning, language checking and translation services
                                          Company Web page: www.writeit.to
                                          Art gallery: www.writeit.to/ruth/gallery
                                          Email: ruth.vilmi@...
                                          Alternative email: ruth.vilmi@...
                                          Mobile: +358 50 368 4696
                                        • vprof99
                                          ... design have been, for ... call for a Web 2.0 ... think so. From my ... multimodality is at the core of ... beginning. It is important that ... by their
                                          Message 20 of 21 , May 29, 2007
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                                            --- In LearningTechnologiesSIG@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Vallance"
                                            <michael@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > The discussions over the weekend regarding teacher training and task
                                            design have been, for
                                            > me at least, particularly interesting. Have they strayed beyond the
                                            call for a Web 2.0
                                            > definition or an in-depth discussion on Web 2.0? Personally, I don't
                                            think so. From my
                                            > research, Task Design that considers multiliteracies and
                                            multimodality is at the core of
                                            > `informed' ICT adoption. Initial teacher training is only the
                                            beginning. It is important that
                                            > teachers continue their professional development, ideally supported
                                            by their employer. I have
                                            > read the insightful comments from Graham Davies and Steve McCarty,
                                            and thank them for
                                            > their contributions. My suggestions for those who wish to `teach'
                                            using these social
                                            > communication tools is to try them yourself: first as a learner
                                            (Polish?); second as a teacher/
                                            > facilitator in a low stakes environment. All experiences will be
                                            unique to your situation:
                                            > yourself, your students, your resources. The next big question I am
                                            now grappling with is,
                                            > How does one assess students' work in a Web 2.0 world? As one
                                            colleague said to me, How
                                            > can you assess 10 Podcasts and reliably state which has more worth
                                            than another? Assuming
                                            > of course that you are teaching a course that requires formal
                                            assessment. Maybe this issue is
                                            > for another thread, another time. Thank you.
                                            > Michael V.
                                            >
                                            I was hanging around reading all the great comments I missed this
                                            weekend (holiday here, darn) and I just couldn't resist responding to
                                            the thoughts here. There are universal standards for evaluating LL,
                                            it seems to me, that the literature stresses and which are taught at
                                            every level in teacher training programs. One of them is that you
                                            don't compare learners to each other (even in a virtual environment
                                            you're going to have to know your students). My other thought is that
                                            assessment, like everything else, will evolve and in fact, will
                                            probably be eliminated along the way, in favor of subjective
                                            performance criteria applied IN CONTEXT. Isn't the lack of context
                                            what has always bothered us when creating assessments? And isn't
                                            context what is lacking in the real-world classroom? Excuse my fuzzy
                                            language, it's veeerrrry late here!
                                          • Graham Davies
                                            Dear Colleagues This puts a new slant on Second Life - and using computers in general: Scientific American 8 December 2006 Second Life: The SUV of Computer
                                            Message 21 of 21 , May 30, 2007
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                                              Dear Colleagues

                                              This puts a new slant on Second Life - and using computers in general:

                                              Scientific American
                                              8 December 2006
                                              Second Life: The SUV of Computer Carbon Emissions
                                              http://tinyurl.com/2pex7z

                                              "[…] your average Second Life avatar consumes about as much
                                              electricity as your average Brazilian."

                                              See also:
                                              Going green: Is the growing power consumption of data centres a
                                              threat or an opportunity?
                                              The Economist
                                              1 March 2007
                                              http://tinyurl.com/37tkkj

                                              "The people, places and things inside Second Life, a thriving online
                                              world with millions of residents, may be imaginary - but the power
                                              consumption of the computers that maintain the illusion is all too
                                              real. Nicholas Carr, a business writer and blogger, recently worked
                                              out that each of the 15,000 or so residents logged in at any one time
                                              consumes electricity as a result of their activities in the virtual
                                              world almost as fast as the average inhabitant of Brazil does in real
                                              life. Second Life's residents, Mr Carr concluded, "don't have bodies,
                                              but they do leave footprints."

                                              Regards
                                              Graham Davies
                                              Emeritus Professor of CALL
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