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Re: [LatinChat-L] Help with a Latin phrase?

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  • Brian Drayton
    Well, if you want archetype, you could use reditus idearum -- archetype is Greek, really and means original kind -- Exemplar would work for
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 29, 2011
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      Well, if you want "archetype," you could use "reditus idearum" --
      "archetype" is Greek, really and means "original kind" --
      Exemplar would work for "exemplary person," (so "reditus exemplarum" --
      3rd declension) though exemplum is an interesting turn of phrase.
      Pronunciation -- First syllable sounds like english "red". Otherwise ok.
      The word order you use is typical, and would be fine for a phrase like
      that, though you could also say "exemplorum reditus", which has a
      different rhythm -- it's grammatical, but doesn't feel right for your
      purpose!


      _______________________
      Brian Drayton, Ph.D.
      Co-Director, Center for School Reform
      TERC, Inc.
      2067 Massachusetts Ave,
      Cambridge, 02140

      (ph) 617-873-9627
      (fax) 617-349-3535
      brian_drayton@...




      From: "David" <dtjarvis@...>
      To: LatinChat-L@yahoogroups.com
      Date: 08/29/2011 12:38 PM
      Subject: [LatinChat-L] Help with a Latin phrase?
      Sent by: LatinChat-L@yahoogroups.com




      Hi, I recently joined the group. I would like to invite your comments on a
      Latin phrase I've created for a novel. I don't have any formal Latin
      training, so I may have bungled it completely.

      The phrase, in English, could be thought of as "The return of the greats",
      or "return of the heroes", or "return of the archetypes".

      What I've come up with so far for the Latin version is "Reditus
      Exemplorum".

      Reditus == Nominative, singular form of a Latin word for "return".

      Exemplorum == Genitive, plural form of exemplum, a Latin word for
      "example".

      If I understand the rules correctly, the "possessed" noun should appear in
      nominative form before the noun that possesses it, and the latter should
      appear in genetive form, as if "of the" were written between them.

      I should admit that to some extent I chose my Latin nouns because I liked
      the way they sounded. I found other possibilities for "return", including
      regressus, recursus, reditio, but didn't like them as well. So there it
      is.

      While 'archetype' appears to be a derivation of the Latin "archetypum",
      I'd like to avoid it for the Latin phrase since it seems to be a fairly
      modern word, and the phrase is to be the title of a book written in Europe
      around the 12th century or earlier. But nothing here is set in stone yet.

      I THINK the pronunciation of my phrase would be:
      ruh-DEE-tus ex-em-PLO-rum

      Again, that might be sheer nonsense. (I realize Latin pronunciation is a
      tough subject that varies by era.)

      I'd be very grateful for any thoughts, comments and/or corrections you'd
      care to offer. Thanks for whatever help you can provide.

      David





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David
      Brian, thanks very much for your comments/suggestions. I hadn t seen the word Exemplar before, and it s really closer to what I was trying to convey, so I may
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 30, 2011
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        Brian, thanks very much for your comments/suggestions. I hadn't seen the word Exemplar before, and it's really closer to what I was trying to convey, so I may use it. The site I've been using for reference (Wiktionary) says the genitive plural is exemplarium, does that sound right?

        Thanks,
        David

        --- In LatinChat-L@yahoogroups.com, Brian Drayton <brian_drayton@...> wrote:
        >
        > Well, if you want "archetype," you could use "reditus idearum" --
        > "archetype" is Greek, really and means "original kind" --
        > Exemplar would work for "exemplary person," (so "reditus exemplarum" --
        > 3rd declension) though exemplum is an interesting turn of phrase.
        > Pronunciation -- First syllable sounds like english "red". Otherwise ok.
        > The word order you use is typical, and would be fine for a phrase like
        > that, though you could also say "exemplorum reditus", which has a
        > different rhythm -- it's grammatical, but doesn't feel right for your
        > purpose!
        >
        >
        > _______________________
        > Brian Drayton, Ph.D.
        > Co-Director, Center for School Reform
        > TERC, Inc.
        > 2067 Massachusetts Ave,
        > Cambridge, 02140
        >
        > (ph) 617-873-9627
        > (fax) 617-349-3535
        > brian_drayton@...
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > From: "David" <dtjarvis@...>
        > To: LatinChat-L@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: 08/29/2011 12:38 PM
        > Subject: [LatinChat-L] Help with a Latin phrase?
        > Sent by: LatinChat-L@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Hi, I recently joined the group. I would like to invite your comments on a
        > Latin phrase I've created for a novel. I don't have any formal Latin
        > training, so I may have bungled it completely.
        >
        > The phrase, in English, could be thought of as "The return of the greats",
        > or "return of the heroes", or "return of the archetypes".
        >
        > What I've come up with so far for the Latin version is "Reditus
        > Exemplorum".
        >
        > Reditus == Nominative, singular form of a Latin word for "return".
        >
        > Exemplorum == Genitive, plural form of exemplum, a Latin word for
        > "example".
        >
        > If I understand the rules correctly, the "possessed" noun should appear in
        > nominative form before the noun that possesses it, and the latter should
        > appear in genetive form, as if "of the" were written between them.
        >
        > I should admit that to some extent I chose my Latin nouns because I liked
        > the way they sounded. I found other possibilities for "return", including
        > regressus, recursus, reditio, but didn't like them as well. So there it
        > is.
        >
        > While 'archetype' appears to be a derivation of the Latin "archetypum",
        > I'd like to avoid it for the Latin phrase since it seems to be a fairly
        > modern word, and the phrase is to be the title of a book written in Europe
        > around the 12th century or earlier. But nothing here is set in stone yet.
        >
        > I THINK the pronunciation of my phrase would be:
        > ruh-DEE-tus ex-em-PLO-rum
        >
        > Again, that might be sheer nonsense. (I realize Latin pronunciation is a
        > tough subject that varies by era.)
        >
        > I'd be very grateful for any thoughts, comments and/or corrections you'd
        > care to offer. Thanks for whatever help you can provide.
        >
        > David
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • gerardo priori
        dictionarium mecum non habeo sed exemplarium correctum videtur. yes, looks like exemplarium is genitive plural for exemplar, exemplaris 3rd declension.
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 6, 2011
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          dictionarium mecum non habeo sed "exemplarium" correctum videtur. yes, looks like "exemplarium" is genitive plural for "exemplar, exemplaris" 3rd declension. pax...junkdriver




          To: LatinChat-L@yahoogroups.com
          From: dtjarvis@...
          Date: Tue, 30 Aug 2011 21:32:56 +0000
          Subject: [LatinChat-L] Re: Help with a Latin phrase?






          Brian, thanks very much for your comments/suggestions. I hadn't seen the word Exemplar before, and it's really closer to what I was trying to convey, so I may use it. The site I've been using for reference (Wiktionary) says the genitive plural is exemplarium, does that sound right?

          Thanks,
          David

          --- In LatinChat-L@yahoogroups.com, Brian Drayton <brian_drayton@...> wrote:
          >
          > Well, if you want "archetype," you could use "reditus idearum" --
          > "archetype" is Greek, really and means "original kind" --
          > Exemplar would work for "exemplary person," (so "reditus exemplarum" --
          > 3rd declension) though exemplum is an interesting turn of phrase.
          > Pronunciation -- First syllable sounds like english "red". Otherwise ok.
          > The word order you use is typical, and would be fine for a phrase like
          > that, though you could also say "exemplorum reditus", which has a
          > different rhythm -- it's grammatical, but doesn't feel right for your
          > purpose!
          >
          >
          > _______________________
          > Brian Drayton, Ph.D.
          > Co-Director, Center for School Reform
          > TERC, Inc.
          > 2067 Massachusetts Ave,
          > Cambridge, 02140
          >
          > (ph) 617-873-9627
          > (fax) 617-349-3535
          > brian_drayton@...
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > From: "David" <dtjarvis@...>
          > To: LatinChat-L@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: 08/29/2011 12:38 PM
          > Subject: [LatinChat-L] Help with a Latin phrase?
          > Sent by: LatinChat-L@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Hi, I recently joined the group. I would like to invite your comments on a
          > Latin phrase I've created for a novel. I don't have any formal Latin
          > training, so I may have bungled it completely.
          >
          > The phrase, in English, could be thought of as "The return of the greats",
          > or "return of the heroes", or "return of the archetypes".
          >
          > What I've come up with so far for the Latin version is "Reditus
          > Exemplorum".
          >
          > Reditus == Nominative, singular form of a Latin word for "return".
          >
          > Exemplorum == Genitive, plural form of exemplum, a Latin word for
          > "example".
          >
          > If I understand the rules correctly, the "possessed" noun should appear in
          > nominative form before the noun that possesses it, and the latter should
          > appear in genetive form, as if "of the" were written between them.
          >
          > I should admit that to some extent I chose my Latin nouns because I liked
          > the way they sounded. I found other possibilities for "return", including
          > regressus, recursus, reditio, but didn't like them as well. So there it
          > is.
          >
          > While 'archetype' appears to be a derivation of the Latin "archetypum",
          > I'd like to avoid it for the Latin phrase since it seems to be a fairly
          > modern word, and the phrase is to be the title of a book written in Europe
          > around the 12th century or earlier. But nothing here is set in stone yet.
          >
          > I THINK the pronunciation of my phrase would be:
          > ruh-DEE-tus ex-em-PLO-rum
          >
          > Again, that might be sheer nonsense. (I realize Latin pronunciation is a
          > tough subject that varies by era.)
          >
          > I'd be very grateful for any thoughts, comments and/or corrections you'd
          > care to offer. Thanks for whatever help you can provide.
          >
          > David
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • RM
          Robertus Sodalibus Plurimam Dicit Salutem Erit annus Latinitate insignis, nam hoc anno audemus duas instituere Septimanas Latinas: Amoeneburgensem et
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 26, 2012
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            Robertus Sodalibus Plurimam Dicit Salutem

            Erit annus Latinitate insignis, nam hoc anno audemus duas instituere
            Septimanas Latinas: Amoeneburgensem et Frisingensem.

            DE PROXIMIS SEPTIMANIS LATINIS
            Ii vestrum, qui anno praeterito Septimanae Latinae Amoeneburgensi
            interfuerunt, bene sciunt numerum participum maiorem fuisse quam umquam
            antea Amoeneburgi visus est. Hanc ob rem statuimus hoc anno duas fieri
            Septimanas Latinas Europaeas, quarum prima Amoeneburgi instituetur, altera
            autem Frisingae in media Bavaria. Cum Amoeneburgo Frisinga id habet commune,
            quod et Frisingae et Amoeneburgi Latinitas iam ex plus mille annis floret.
            Prima Septimana Latina Europaea huius anni Amoeneburgensis erit, quae die 28
            m. Iulii incipiet et die 4 m. Augusti finem habebit.
            Altera Septimana Latina Europaea Frisingae instituetur a die 2 ad diem 8
            mensis Septembris.
            Omnia quae ad Septimanas Latinas pertinent, hic conspicietis:
            http://www.septimanalatina.org

            DE LIBRIS NOSTRIS NOVIS
            Pro novis Septimanis Latinis nunc etiam novi libri adsunt! Multi iam spem
            deposuerant se librum nostrum, qui “Piper Salve” appellatur, umquam accipere
            posse, cum ex nonnullis annis omnino divenditus esset. Libris novis – sunt
            enim duae partes – titulus bene notus est SEPTIMANA LATINA. Prima pars
            SEPTIMANAE LATINAE textus et imagines continet, secunda autem pars
            exercitationes, grammaticam, vocabula.
            Plura de SEPTIMANA LATINA hic comperietis:
            http://www.septimanalatina.org/txt/l/libri.html
            Ibi etiam alios libros a nobis divulgatos invenies velut Lexicon Visuale
            Latinum et novam editionem Orbis Picti, qui praecipue ad usum cotidianum
            linguae Latinae spectant.

            Speramus fore, ut vos hoc anno Amoeneburgi vel Frisingae salutare possimus.

            Optime valete!


            [Si hunc nuntium pluries acceperitis, ignoscite quaeso nobis.]
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