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Re: [LatinChat-L] Help with English to Latin Translation

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  • David Ovspaine
    You re correct, it is a noun, but in this context, it s being used as a verb. Pressure means to apply pressure on a player, or a player that possesses the
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 8, 2011
      You're correct, it is a noun, but in this context, it's being used as a
      verb. Pressure means to apply pressure on a player, or a player that
      possesses the ball, or the ball itself. It's synonymous with attack the
      ball. It's a colloquialism unique to my club; more of an inside joke than
      anything else.

      That stated, do you have any advise for a Latin translation?
      On Mon, Aug 8, 2011 at 2:46 PM, Sally Magill <Sally@...>wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > Interesting request. But what does "pressure that" mean? "Pressure" is a
      > noun, not a verb - I checked with the Oxford English Dictionary in case
      > there might be an unusual usage of it as a verb, but no. Whenever
      > translating into Latin you need to analyse what exactly the English
      > means.
      > Sally.
      >
      > In message <j1n99i+118h9@...>, ovspaine <ovspaine@...>
      > writes
      >
      > >
      > >
      > >Hi folks,
      > >
      > >I coach a soccer club that wants to change its motto to "pressue
      > >that". Pressure is the verb, and that is the object, such as a ball or
      > >person. The best I've come up with, thus far, is Aliquam Quad. Is this
      > >accurate, or does anyone have a better translation they would offer
      > >me?
      > >Thanks very much for your help.
      > >
      > >Dwight
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • gengar@cfl.rr.com
      Maybe it s just my weird American dialect (as well as having pushovers for friends & associates?), but I hear things like this all the time: S/he pressured me
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 8, 2011
        Maybe it's just my weird American dialect
        (as well as having pushovers for friends & associates?),
        but I hear things like this all the time:

        "S/he pressured me into {buying this car}, and now I regret it."


        ---- Sally Magill <Sally@...> wrote:
        > Interesting request. But what does "pressure that" mean? "Pressure" is a
        > noun, not a verb - I checked with the Oxford English Dictionary in case
        > there might be an unusual usage of it as a verb, but no. Whenever
        > translating into Latin you need to analyse what exactly the English
        > means.
        > Sally.

        --
        _S/_o
        Deirdre Welter
        Reading Now: The Reluctant Disciplinarian + various pieces on Roman history
      • Sally Magill
        Sorry, Dwight, my apologies. Of course, pressure can be used as a verb, and it is listed as such in the OED - I missed it, writing late after a tiring day.
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 9, 2011
          Sorry, Dwight, my apologies. Of course, "pressure" can be used as a
          verb, and it is listed as such in the OED - I missed it, writing late
          after a tiring day. What confused me was having "that" after "pressure",
          which sounded strange and made me forget about the usage for pressuring
          a person.

          As it's an in-joke type of expression I think you need to have it as
          close to the English as possible so that people are amused by
          recognizing the English behind the Latin.

          So I thought why not have the Latin noun as it is so close to the
          English word, but add "semper" (means always) to give a bit of the sense
          of the imperative:

          Pressura semper in illud (the ball)
          Pressura semper in illum (a person)
          Pressura semper in illum illudque (both ball and person)
          Pressura semper in illum aut illud. (Ball or person)

          Perhaps someone else will have a better idea?

          Sally.




          >You're correct, it is a noun, but in this context, it's being used as a
          >verb. Pressure means to apply pressure on a player, or a player that
          >possesses the ball, or the ball itself. It's synonymous with attack the
          >ball. It's a colloquialism unique to my club; more of an inside joke
          >than
          >anything else.
          >
          >That stated, do you have any advise for a Latin translation?
          >On Mon, Aug 8, 2011 at 2:46 PM, Sally Magill <
          >Sally@...>wrote:
          >
          >> **
          >>
          >>
          >> Interesting request. But what does "pressure that" mean? "Pressure"
          >is a
          >> noun, not a verb - I checked with the Oxford English Dictionary in
          >case
          >> there might be an unusual usage of it as a verb, but no. Whenever
          >> translating into Latin you need to analyse what exactly the English
          >> means.
          >> Sally.
          >>
          >> In message <j1n99i+118h9@...>, ovspaine <
          >ovspaine@...>
          >> writes
          >>
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >Hi folks,
          >> >
          >> >I coach a soccer club that wants to change its motto to "pressue
          >> >that". Pressure is the verb, and that is the object, such as a ball or
          >> >person. The best I've come up with, thus far, is Aliquam Quad. Is
          >this
          >> >accurate, or does anyone have a better translation they would
          >offer
          >> >me?
          >> >Thanks very much for your help.
          >> >
          >> >Dwight
        • David Ovspaine
          Hi Sally, Thank you very much for taking the time to offer your suggestions. I greatly appreciate your assistance. On Tue, Aug 9, 2011 at 11:21 AM, Sally
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 9, 2011
            Hi Sally,

            Thank you very much for taking the time to offer your suggestions. I
            greatly appreciate your assistance.

            On Tue, Aug 9, 2011 at 11:21 AM, Sally Magill
            <Sally@...>wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > Sorry, Dwight, my apologies. Of course, "pressure" can be used as a
            > verb, and it is listed as such in the OED - I missed it, writing late
            > after a tiring day. What confused me was having "that" after "pressure",
            > which sounded strange and made me forget about the usage for pressuring
            > a person.
            >
            > As it's an in-joke type of expression I think you need to have it as
            > close to the English as possible so that people are amused by
            > recognizing the English behind the Latin.
            >
            > So I thought why not have the Latin noun as it is so close to the
            > English word, but add "semper" (means always) to give a bit of the sense
            > of the imperative:
            >
            > Pressura semper in illud (the ball)
            > Pressura semper in illum (a person)
            > Pressura semper in illum illudque (both ball and person)
            > Pressura semper in illum aut illud. (Ball or person)
            >
            > Perhaps someone else will have a better idea?
            >
            > Sally.
            >
            >
            > >You're correct, it is a noun, but in this context, it's being used as a
            > >verb. Pressure means to apply pressure on a player, or a player that
            > >possesses the ball, or the ball itself. It's synonymous with attack the
            > >ball. It's a colloquialism unique to my club; more of an inside joke
            > >than
            > >anything else.
            > >
            > >That stated, do you have any advise for a Latin translation?
            > >On Mon, Aug 8, 2011 at 2:46 PM, Sally Magill <
            > >Sally@...>wrote:
            > >
            > >> **
            > >>
            > >>
            > >> Interesting request. But what does "pressure that" mean? "Pressure"
            > >is a
            > >> noun, not a verb - I checked with the Oxford English Dictionary in
            > >case
            > >> there might be an unusual usage of it as a verb, but no. Whenever
            > >> translating into Latin you need to analyse what exactly the English
            > >> means.
            > >> Sally.
            > >>
            > >> In message <j1n99i+118h9@...>, ovspaine <
            > >ovspaine@...>
            > >> writes
            > >>
            > >> >
            > >> >
            > >> >Hi folks,
            > >> >
            > >> >I coach a soccer club that wants to change its motto to "pressue
            > >> >that". Pressure is the verb, and that is the object, such as a ball or
            > >> >person. The best I've come up with, thus far, is Aliquam Quad. Is
            > >this
            > >> >accurate, or does anyone have a better translation they would
            > >offer
            > >> >me?
            > >> >Thanks very much for your help.
            > >> >
            > >> >Dwight
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • gerardo priori
            having had some contact with sports, i vote premite illud as making the most sense, and leave it at that...junkdriver To: LatinChat-L@yahoogroups.com From:
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 10, 2011
              having had some contact with sports, i vote "premite illud" as making the most sense, and leave it at that...junkdriver

              To: LatinChat-L@yahoogroups.com
              From: ma44ri12us19c@...
              Date: Mon, 8 Aug 2011 09:06:22 -0700
              Subject: Re: [LatinChat-L] Help with English to Latin Translation




























              It could be: "Preme illud" if you say this command to a one person in the present tense.

              Premito illud: if the command is addressed to a group in the present tense.



              Premite illud: if the command is directed to a one person for the future.

              Premitote illud: if is said to a group for the future.



              Illud is the translation of that, and is neuter gender. It's the object, singular.

              Illa is neuter gender, plural.

              Illum is male gender, singular.

              Illos is male gender, plural.

              Illam, female gender, singular

              Illas, female gender, plural.

              So, make the changes you wish, using the words I gave you.

              Because English is so simple that it is not possible to know what is the meaning you want to

              express with your motto. Hopefully it will be of help for you.





              De: ovspaine <ovspaine@...>

              Para: LatinChat-L@yahoogroups.com

              Enviado: Domingo, 7 de agosto, 2011 17:06:10

              Asunto: [LatinChat-L] Help with English to Latin Translation







              Hi folks,



              I coach a soccer club that wants to change its motto to "pressue that". Pressure is the verb, and that is the object, such as a ball or person. The best I've come up with, thus far, is Aliquam Quad. Is this accurate, or does anyone have a better translation they would offer me?



              Thanks very much for your help.



              Dwight



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Sally Magill
              Hi Dwight, You re welcome, I enjoy fun quests such like this one! But on second thoughts, I would support Gerardo: having had some contact with sports, i vote
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 12, 2011
                Hi Dwight,

                You're welcome, I enjoy fun quests such like this one!

                But on second thoughts, I would support Gerardo:

                "having had some contact with sports, i vote "premite illud" as making
                the most sense, and leave it at that...junkdriver"

                I looked up "pressura" in a bigger dictionary, and a main meaning seemed
                to be pressing of grapes for wine!

                Sooo, premite illud and wishing you lots of success with your club,

                Sally.






                In message
                <CAOK664sbvm2V1qOTs24oFaQnwEqaV3zYTD6=+EEXEE_x8P_iUg@...>,
                David Ovspaine <ovspaine@...> writes

                >
                >Hi Sally,
                >
                >Thank you very much for taking the time to offer your suggestions. I
                >greatly appreciate your assistance.
                >
                >On Tue, Aug 9, 2011 at 11:21 AM, Sally Magill
                ><Sally@...>wrote:
                >
                >> **
                >>
                >>
                >> Sorry, Dwight, my apologies. Of course, "pressure" can be used as a
                >> verb, and it is listed as such in the OED - I missed it, writing late
                >> after a tiring day. What confused me was having "that" after
                >"pressure",
                >> which sounded strange and made me forget about the usage for
                >pressuring
                >> a person.
                >>
                >> As it's an in-joke type of expression I think you need to have it as
                >> close to the English as possible so that people are amused by
                >> recognizing the English behind the Latin.
                >>
                >> So I thought why not have the Latin noun as it is so close to the
                >> English word, but add "semper" (means always) to give a bit of the
                >sense
                >> of the imperative:
                >>
                >> Pressura semper in illud (the ball)
                >> Pressura semper in illum (a person)
                >> Pressura semper in illum illudque (both ball and person)
                >> Pressura semper in illum aut illud. (Ball or person)
                >>
                >> Perhaps someone else will have a better idea?
                >>
                >> Sally.
                >>
                >>
                >> >You're correct, it is a noun, but in this context, it's being used as a
                >> >verb. Pressure means to apply pressure on a player, or a player
                >that
                >> >possesses the ball, or the ball itself. It's synonymous with attack
                >the
                >> >ball. It's a colloquialism unique to my club; more of an inside joke
                >> >than
                >> >anything else.
                >> >
                >> >That stated, do you have any advise for a Latin translation?
                >> >On Mon, Aug 8, 2011 at 2:46 PM, Sally Magill <
                >> >Sally@...>wrote:
                >> >
                >> >> **
                >> >>
                >> >>
                >> >> Interesting request. But what does "pressure that" mean?
                >"Pressure"
                >> >is a
                >> >> noun, not a verb - I checked with the Oxford English Dictionary
                >in
                >> >case
                >> >> there might be an unusual usage of it as a verb, but no.
                >Whenever
                >> >> translating into Latin you need to analyse what exactly the
                >English
                >> >> means.
                >> >> Sally.
                >> >>
                >> >> In message <j1n99i+118h9@...>, ovspaine <
                >> >ovspaine@...>
                >> >> writes
                >> >>
                >> >> >
                >> >> >
                >> >> >Hi folks,
                >> >> >
                >> >> >I coach a soccer club that wants to change its motto to "pressue
                >> >> >that". Pressure is the verb, and that is the object, such as a ball
                >or
                >> >> >person. The best I've come up with, thus far, is Aliquam Quad.
                >Is
                >> >this
                >> >> >accurate, or does anyone have a better translation they would
                >> >offer
                >> >> >me?
                >> >> >Thanks very much for your help.
                >> >> >
                >> >> >Dwight
                >>
                >>
                >>
                >
                >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >

                --
                Sally Magill
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