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Questions regarding Expessions of age in Latin

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  • Peter
    I found this expression on age in John 8:57 in the Vulgate: Dixerunt ergo Iudaei ad eum quinquaginta annos nondum habes et Abraham vidisti How common is
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 1, 2008
      I found this expression on age in John 8:57 in the Vulgate:

      "Dixerunt ergo Iudaei ad eum quinquaginta annos nondum habes et
      Abraham vidisti"

      How common is habere+ number+ annos to express age in Classical
      Latin? In Genesis 5:32 the Vulgate expresses age with esse + number+
      annorum "Noe vero cum quingentorum esset annorum genuit Sem et Ham
      et Iafeth". Which expression is more common in classical use?

      Are these sentences correct about using age:

      "Avus meus mortuus est cum quinque annos habebam".

      "Pater meus mortuus est ante duos dies quam duodequinquaginta annos
      habui". Isn't the perfect tense used for the day one attains an age
      as in Romance languages?

      Peter
    • Sandrien Noppen
      The right expression in Classical Latin is: x annos natus, a, um (esse) OR x annos abhinc natus, a, um (esse) certainly NOT: x annos habere The last one is
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 20, 2008
        The right expression in Classical Latin is:

        x annos natus, a, um (esse)
        OR
        x annos abhinc natus, a, um (esse)
        certainly NOT:
        x annos habere

        The last one is later Latin, it still survives in Roman languages as French, Italian, ... (j'ai x ans, ho x anni, ...)

        --- On Sun, 6/1/08, Peter <pkoden69@...> wrote:
        From: Peter <pkoden69@...>
        Subject: [LatinChat-L] Questions regarding Expessions of age in Latin
        To: LatinChat-L@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, June 1, 2008, 2:17 AM











        I found this expression on age in John 8:57 in the Vulgate:



        "Dixerunt ergo Iudaei ad eum quinquaginta annos nondum habes et

        Abraham vidisti"



        How common is habere+ number+ annos to express age in Classical

        Latin? In Genesis 5:32 the Vulgate expresses age with esse + number+

        annorum "Noe vero cum quingentorum esset annorum genuit Sem et Ham

        et Iafeth". Which expression is more common in classical use?



        Are these sentences correct about using age:



        "Avus meus mortuus est cum quinque annos habebam".



        "Pater meus mortuus est ante duos dies quam duodequinquaginta annos

        habui". Isn't the perfect tense used for the day one attains an age

        as in Romance languages?



        Peter





























        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Peter
        Thanks for explaining the Classical Latin construction. What about this Vulgate expression : Noe vero cum quingentorum esset annorum genuit Sem et Ham et
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 27, 2008
          Thanks for explaining the Classical Latin construction.

          What about this Vulgate expression : ""Noe vero cum quingentorum
          esset annorum genuit Sem et Ham et Iafeth" which is the finite form
          of esse + n. annorum". Is that also a Late Latin construction?

          The Vulgate seems to have many constuctions in from both Classical
          Latin and Vulgar Latin. I noticed that purpose is often expressed
          with the infintive (when both SUBJECTS ARE THE SAME) as in Romance
          while other verses use ut + subjunctive even when the subjects are
          the same.


          Peter
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