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  • Rusty Mason
    Wheelock, chapter 16, practice & review, question #7: Vis belli acerbi autem vitam eius paucis horis mutavit. This looks like it could be The violence of a
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 1, 2005
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      Wheelock, chapter 16, practice & review, question #7:

      Vis belli acerbi autem vitam eius paucis horis mutavit.

      This looks like it could be

      "The violence of a bitter war, however, changed his life 'for' a few
      hours."

      or

      "The violence of a bitter war, however, changed his life 'by means of'
      a few hours." or "... with a few hours."

      How can I tell which to use?

      Vale,
      Rusty
    • Christian
      Savlete Rusty et omnes, Michi non certum est set in Latine, multa ambigua est. Cum facilior in tua lingua patria quam in lingua Latina explicem, in lingua
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 1, 2005
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        Savlete Rusty et omnes,

        Michi non certum est set in Latine, multa ambigua est. Cum facilior
        in tua lingua patria quam in lingua Latina explicem, in lingua
        Anglica scribam. Idcirco, omnes excusare me amabo, praecipue qui
        Anglicam linguam non sciunt....


        Usually, when time is expressed in the ablative, without any
        preposition, then it can be 1)time at which, 2)time within which. It
        would be extremely rare where "paucis horis" was meant to be
        something other than an expression of time, like "by means of which"
        or something of that sort. In fact, I'm not really sure what that
        would mean, "by means of a few hours"?

        Anyway, so that means you generally only have two options. Either..

        "at a few hours" , which doesn't make any sense. Or "within a few
        hours." Makes much more sense. So it is probably the latter.

        Vis belli acerbi autem vitam eius pacis horis mutauit. The strength
        of the bitter war changed his life in a few hours. (time within
        which)

        If it was time "during which", meaning his life literally changed
        for those hours, (and those hours only!) it would be expressed in
        the accusative. Like:

        Romulos septem et tringinta regnauit annos. Romulos reigned thirty-
        seven years.

        Although it usually has the preposition "per" in front of it. Such
        as "per paucas horas" = "for those few hours" or "during those few
        hours"

        Other expressions of time in Latin which take the ablative must use
        prepositions to make the sense clear - such as "how long ago"
        with "abhinc", "how long before" with "ante" or "how long after"
        with "post".

        I hope this helps!

        Valete,
        Christianus

        --- In LatinChat-L@yahoogroups.com, "Rusty Mason" <rusty@r...> wrote:
        >
        > Wheelock, chapter 16, practice & review, question #7:
        >
        > Vis belli acerbi autem vitam eius paucis horis mutavit.
        >
        > This looks like it could be
        >
        > "The violence of a bitter war, however, changed his life 'for' a
        few
        > hours."
        >
        > or
        >
        > "The violence of a bitter war, however, changed his life 'by means
        of'
        > a few hours." or "... with a few hours."
        >
        > How can I tell which to use?
        >
        > Vale,
        > Rusty
      • Adam Germany
        Perhaps you could say In just a few hours, the bitter war changed his life (as in he won t be the same again with this new experience). or In just a few hours,
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 1, 2005
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          Perhaps you could say

          In just a few hours, the bitter war changed his life
          (as in he won't be the same again with this new
          experience).

          or

          In just a few hours, he life was (totally) changed by
          bitter war. (passive voice, of course)






          --- Rusty Mason <rusty@...> wrote:
          >
          > Wheelock, chapter 16, practice & review, question
          > #7:
          >
          > Vis belli acerbi autem vitam eius paucis horis
          > mutavit.
          >
          > This looks like it could be
          >
          > "The violence of a bitter war, however, changed his
          > life 'for' a few
          > hours."
          >
          > or
          >
          > "The violence of a bitter war, however, changed his
          > life 'by means of'
          > a few hours." or "... with a few hours."
          >
          > How can I tell which to use?
          >
          > Vale,
          > Rusty
          >
          >
          >
          >



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        • Rebecca Jessup
          Sed vis amissus est. Vis est qui vitam eius mutavit, vis belli. Itaque, potes dicere: Within a few hours, the force of the bitter (or harsh) war changed his
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 1, 2005
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            Sed "vis" amissus est. Vis est qui vitam eius mutavit, vis belli.
            Itaque, potes dicere:
            Within a few hours, the force of the bitter (or harsh) war changed his
            life.

            On Friday, April 1, 2005, at 04:18 PM, Adam Germany wrote:

            >
            > Perhaps you could say
            >
            > In just a few hours, the bitter war changed his life
            > (as in he won't be the same again with this new
            > experience).
            >
            > or
            >
            > In just a few hours, he life was (totally) changed by
            > bitter war. (passive voice, of course)
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- Rusty Mason <rusty@...> wrote:
            >>
            >> Wheelock, chapter 16, practice & review, question
            >> #7:
            >>
            >> Vis belli acerbi autem vitam eius paucis horis
            >> mutavit.
            >>
            >> This looks like it could be
            >>
            >> "The violence of a bitter war, however, changed his
            >> life 'for' a few
            >> hours."
            >>
            >> or
            >>
            >> "The violence of a bitter war, however, changed his
            >> life 'by means of'
            >> a few hours." or "... with a few hours."
            >>
            >> How can I tell which to use?
            >>
            >> Vale,
            >> Rusty
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            >
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            Rebecca Jessup
            jessupr@...

            "It is only the savage, whether of the African bush or the American
            gospel tent, who pretends to know the will and intent of God exactly
            and completely." H.L. Mencken


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • eceratops
            ... paucis horis Primum vide indicem WHEELOCKensem, in pagina 493, sub nomine Ablative case . . . of time when or within which. Praeterea vide Allen &
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 1, 2005
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              --- In LatinChat-L@yahoogroups.com, "Rusty Mason" <rusty@r...> wrote:
              >
              > Wheelock, chapter 16, practice & review, question #7:
              >
              > Vis belli acerbi autem vitam eius paucis horis mutavit.

              "paucis horis"

              Primum vide indicem WHEELOCKensem, in pagina 493, sub
              nomine "Ablative case . . . of time when or within which."

              Praeterea vide Allen & Greenough's Grammar (1903):

              "Time *when*, or *within which*, is expressed by the Ablative; time
              *how long* by the Accusative.

              Ablative:--

              constituta die, on the appointed day; prima luce, at daybreak.
              quota hora, at what o'clock? tertia vigilia, in the third watch.
              > tribus proximis annis (Iug. 11) , within the last three years.
              > diebus viginti quinque aggerem exstruxerunt (B. G. 7.24) , within
              twentyfive days they finished building a mound.
              . . .

              http://perseus.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3Atext%
              3A1999.04.0001&query=head%3D%23255
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