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Arguing the rules

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  • edgington52@comcast.net
    I’ve certainly seen that.  Of course, the fact that so many of my favorite rules are out there in several version (The Sword and the Flame and Command
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 16, 2009
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      I’ve certainly seen that.  Of course, the fact that so many of my favorite rules are out there in several version (The Sword and the Flame and Command Decision are both on their fourth versions, for example) gives people plenty of room for legitimate confusion,  without even considering the memory hiccups those of us who have reached my advanced age are prone to, the deliberate distortion of a rule, or an effort to just wear down the opposition. 



      But, to answer the question the guys asked, if they will just look up the rule, they can move from arguing about whether or not it is a rule, to the higher, more fun level of arguing the interpretation of the rule!



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      David Edgington

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jim Keats
      I hate Rules Lawyers !  That said, I ve been known to point out times where the Game Master isn t following the rules as written.  (Yes, I like to have my
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 17, 2009
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        I hate "Rules Lawyers"!  That said, I've been known to point out times where the Game Master isn't following the rules as written.  (Yes, I like to have my cake and eat it too!).

        Of course, are club has one house rule that is added to EVERY set of rules..."the GM is always correct.".  Granted, sometimes the GM will change a ruling based on what the person points out in the rules.

        We play "friendly war games".      (as opposed to Tournaments!)

        Speaking of tournaments...I heard a story where a guy said that he had an unbeatable deck of cards (Magic the Gathering tournament).  The card said "opponent loses next turn".  He interpreted it as he WON on the next turn...not that his opponent skipped a turn!

        - Jim





        --- On Fri, 10/16/09, edgington52@... <edgington52@...> wrote:

        From: edgington52@... <edgington52@...>
        Subject: [LarryLeadhead] Arguing the rules
        To: "LarryLeadhead" <LarryLeadhead@yahoogroups.com>
        Date: Friday, October 16, 2009, 8:58 PM






         









        I’ve certainly seen that.  Of course, the fact that so many of my favorite rules are out there in several version (The Sword and the Flame and Command Decision are both on their fourth versions, for example) gives people plenty of room for legitimate confusion,  without even considering the memory hiccups those of us who have reached my advanced age are prone to, the deliberate distortion of a rule, or an effort to just wear down the opposition. 



        But, to answer the question the guys asked, if they will just look up the rule, they can move from arguing about whether or not it is a rule, to the higher, more fun level of arguing the interpretation of the rule!



                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        David Edgington



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]































        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • timothymyall1
        I have to be careful here as a fully paid up rules lawyer. That said I did once have a doubles game (it was DBR 2.0) where my opponent made a move that I
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 17, 2009
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          I have to be careful here as a fully paid up rules lawyer. That said I did once have a doubles game (it was DBR 2.0) where my opponent made a move that I considered legal but my partner said was not. My opponent conceeded the point. A couple of turns later my parter tried the exact same move and would not have it that he could not!

          --- In LarryLeadhead@yahoogroups.com, Jim Keats <jim_keats@...> wrote:
          >
          > I hate "Rules Lawyers"!  That said, I've been known to point out times where the Game Master isn't following the rules as written.  (Yes, I like to have my cake and eat it too!).
          >
          <snip>
        • Graham Evans
          ... There is a difference between pointing out when someone is not playing to the rules (ie cheating) and people who do the rules don t say I can t do that
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 18, 2009
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            > I hate "Rules Lawyers"! That said, I've been known to point out times
            > where the Game Master isn't following the rules as written. (Yes, I like
            > to have my cake and eat it too!).
            >

            There is a difference between pointing out when someone is not playing to
            the rules (ie cheating) and people who do "the rules don't say I can't do
            that" (rules lawyering).

            It is possible to object to both without being a hypocrite.

            Graham
          • Eric Hotz
            I had a friend who wrote an RPG gaming system and he was the ultimate rules lawyer . If you were playing a game with him, he d stop the game to write up
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 18, 2009
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              I had a friend who wrote an RPG gaming system and he was the ultimate
              "rules lawyer". If you were playing a game with him, he'd stop the
              game to write up better rules, or to comment on how the rules should
              be written. He stopped a game once for three hours while he wrote up
              "his" version of the rules. Everyone just watched TV or sat around
              reading books while he did this. I stopped putting on games at his
              place because of this. I was also involved in play testing new RPG
              rules/games where I worked and having him in the room meant that we
              rarely got to plat test anything. It was play one turn, stop for
              three hours, play a turn, stop for three hours... I prefer to play
              the game right through, and then argue and pick at the play test set
              of play test rules, not stop every five minutes to "fix" something.

              That also reminds me of a player in our club our past club president
              called, "General Should Have". This player past away last year and
              at his funeral I discovered why he was a rules lawyer. His IQ was
              extremely high. In fact, he was one of the youngest students in
              Canada to have graduated from High School at the age of 16. He had a
              huge ego compounded with a high IQ, which he used to point out "all"
              the problems with anything and everything, but usually manifested
              itself on the tabletop. Rules were his favorite subject. He always
              started with the phrase, "You know what you should have done... " I
              can still remember him arguing to the point of screaming about some
              problem he had with a set of Napoleonic rules -- that was back in the
              mid-1980's and that was also just before our club banned Napoleonics
              from the club because the arguments were fierce and numerous.
              Nowadays, only a handful of people play Napoleonics at our club.

              This club member is now immortalized as a Larry Leadhead character.


              E.H.
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