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Philadelphia - Daily News story on aging Silverliners' retirement

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  • Edward
    Philadelphia Daily News posted a story Monday about the retirement and last runs of the final two electric multiple-unit [eMU] Silverliner commuter coaches
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 2, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Philadelphia Daily News posted a story Monday about the retirement and last runs of the final two electric multiple-unit [eMU] Silverliner commuter coaches built in the 1960s. SEPTA operated the Silverliner II and III series cars for the final time June 29:
      http://tinyurl.com/89was7w
      "Posted: Mon, Jul. 2, 2012, 5:37 AM
      One last ride on SEPTA's retiring Silverliners
      By Dan Geringer
      Daily News Staff Writer
      Philadelphia Daily News

      (photo caption)
      Larry Ryan, of Norristown, has been operating the retiring Silverliners for 33 years and says he'll miss them. PHOTOS: DAN GERINGER / DAILY NEWS STAFF
      (gallery - 2 images)

      (article)
      FAWAIZ CLEMENS and Christopher Henderson, both 21, traveled to Philly from New York City on Friday just to ride the last Silverliner II and Silverliner III cars in SEPTA Regional Rail service, making their final run from Suburban Station to Bala Cynwyd before, as Arlo Gutherie sang, "this train's got the disappearing railroad blues."

      "I've been like this with trains since I was 2 years old," Clemens said. "I want to be a train operator or a bus operator or a cleaner or a custodian — just anything to work in a transit company."

      "This train has been here since the civil-rights movement. Just riding in it makes me feel great."

      Both Clemens and Henderson rode the "Last Train to Cynwyd" Friday from noon until its final run about 8 p.m.

      So did R.L. Eastwood Jr., president of the National Railway Historical Society's Philadelphia chapter, who shared a Silverliner memory with Larry Ryan, of Norristown, a SEPTA engineer who has been operating Silverliners for 33 years.

      "I was at Jenkintown station when the first Silverliner IIs were delivered from the Budd Company on Red Lion Road for testing before they were put into passenger service," Eastwood said.

      Ryan said he was there, too.

      "You going to miss them?" Eastwood asked.

      "When you've operated something for 33 years and suddenly it's gone," Ryan said, "you miss it."

      Eastwood said that Silverliner II railcar No. 9010 was built in 1963 by Budd, while the attached Silverliner III railcar No. 235 was built in 1967 by the St. Louis Car Company — both of them vast improvements over the 1930s-built Reading Blueliners they replaced.

      Ryan said Philadelphia commuters had never seen anything like those early Silverliners. "They had air-conditioning, faster acceleration, better braking, comfortable seats and heat like you were in your room at home," he said. "I enjoyed being a part of industrial development that was ahead of its time."

      George Walters, SEPTA's assistant director of operations, who has "spent thousands of hours behind the throttle" of the Silverliner IIs and IIIs in the past decade, said that although they were "classic cars" with incredible longevity, it was time to say goodbye.

      "We have trouble getting parts. They don't meet Americans With Disabilities (ADA) requirements like the new handicapped-accessible Silverliner Vs do," Walters said. "After over 40 years of service, they've come to the end of their life span. I only hope the new ones last as long."
      [end text]
      The "disappearing railroad blues" referred to in the lead sentences of the story is from the song, "City of New Orleans":
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OfxoM6trtZE
      Here are the lyrics:
      "The City of New Orleans
      by Steve Goodman

      Riding on the City of New Orleans,
      Illinois Central Monday morning rail
      Fifteen cars and fifteen restless riders,
      Three conductors and twenty-five sacks of mail.
      All along the southbound odyssey
      The train pulls out at Kankakee
      Rolls along past houses, farms and fields.
      Passin' trains that have no names,
      Freight yards full of old black men
      And the graveyards of the rusted automobiles.

      CHORUS:
      Good morning America how are you?
      Don't you know me I'm your native son,
      I'm the train they call The City of New Orleans,
      I'll be gone five hundred miles when the day is done.

      Dealin' card games with the old men in the club car.
      Penny a point ain't no one keepin' score.
      Pass the paper bag that holds the bottle
      Feel the wheels rumblin' 'neath the floor.
      And the sons of pullman porters
      And the sons of engineers
      Ride their father's magic carpets made of steel.
      Mothers with their babes asleep,
      Are rockin' to the gentle beat
      And the rhythm of the rails is all they feel.

      CHORUS

      Nighttime on The City of New Orleans,
      Changing cars in Memphis, Tennessee.
      Half way home, we'll be there by morning
      Through the Mississippi darkness
      Rolling down to the sea.
      And all the towns and people seem
      To fade into a bad dream
      And the steel rails still ain't heard the news.
      The conductor sings his song again,
      The passengers will please refrain
      This train's got the disappearing railroad blues.

      Good night, America, how are you?
      Don't you know me I'm your native son,
      I'm the train they call The City of New Orleans,
      I'll be gone five hundred miles when the day is done.
      http://www.arlo.net/resources/lyrics/new-orleans.shtml
      -----
      Edward B. Havens
      Tucson, Ariz.
    • Ken Houseal
      Ed, Thanks for the post. I rode them when they were new. Gee! No SEPTA then. Wow! What a thrill compared to the old green Reading MU s. For the record this was
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 2, 2012
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        Ed,
        Thanks for the post. I rode them when they were new. Gee! No SEPTA then. Wow! What a thrill compared to the old green Reading MU's. For the record this was way before the Reading rebuilt some of their original cars into air conditioned "Blueliners"! Reporter error, the Silverliner II & IIIs did NOT replace Blueliners. The Blueliners only took up the slack until the "Center City Commuter Tunnel" was built and the Silverliner IVs arrived in droves replacing Blueliners. Anyone remember seeing Reading MUs both green and blue in freight trains going to Reading for major repairs? I do. I'll miss the variety that the old cars offered in the seemingly endless daily parade of Silverliner IV and now Korean Silverliner Vs. A far cry from the late and lamented Reading MU's. I miss them already.
        Ken




        To: Lansdale_rails@yahoogroups.com
        From: edhavens@...
        Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2012 02:00:29 +0000
        Subject: [Lansdale] Philadelphia - Daily News story on aging Silverliners' retirement





        Philadelphia Daily News posted a story Monday about the retirement and last runs of the final two electric multiple-unit [eMU] Silverliner commuter coaches built in the 1960s. SEPTA operated the Silverliner II and III series cars for the final time June 29:
        http://tinyurl.com/89was7w
        "Posted: Mon, Jul. 2, 2012, 5:37 AM
        One last ride on SEPTA's retiring Silverliners
        By Dan Geringer
        Daily News Staff Writer
        Philadelphia Daily News

        (photo caption)
        Larry Ryan, of Norristown, has been operating the retiring Silverliners for 33 years and says he'll miss them. PHOTOS: DAN GERINGER / DAILY NEWS STAFF
        (gallery - 2 images)

        (article)
        FAWAIZ CLEMENS and Christopher Henderson, both 21, traveled to Philly from New York City on Friday just to ride the last Silverliner II and Silverliner III cars in SEPTA Regional Rail service, making their final run from Suburban Station to Bala Cynwyd before, as Arlo Gutherie sang, "this train's got the disappearing railroad blues."

        "I've been like this with trains since I was 2 years old," Clemens said. "I want to be a train operator or a bus operator or a cleaner or a custodian � just anything to work in a transit company."

        "This train has been here since the civil-rights movement. Just riding in it makes me feel great."

        Both Clemens and Henderson rode the "Last Train to Cynwyd" Friday from noon until its final run about 8 p.m.

        So did R.L. Eastwood Jr., president of the National Railway Historical Society's Philadelphia chapter, who shared a Silverliner memory with Larry Ryan, of Norristown, a SEPTA engineer who has been operating Silverliners for 33 years.

        "I was at Jenkintown station when the first Silverliner IIs were delivered from the Budd Company on Red Lion Road for testing before they were put into passenger service," Eastwood said.

        Ryan said he was there, too.

        "You going to miss them?" Eastwood asked.

        "When you've operated something for 33 years and suddenly it's gone," Ryan said, "you miss it."

        Eastwood said that Silverliner II railcar No. 9010 was built in 1963 by Budd, while the attached Silverliner III railcar No. 235 was built in 1967 by the St. Louis Car Company � both of them vast improvements over the 1930s-built Reading Blueliners they replaced.

        Ryan said Philadelphia commuters had never seen anything like those early Silverliners. "They had air-conditioning, faster acceleration, better braking, comfortable seats and heat like you were in your room at home," he said. "I enjoyed being a part of industrial development that was ahead of its time."

        George Walters, SEPTA's assistant director of operations, who has "spent thousands of hours behind the throttle" of the Silverliner IIs and IIIs in the past decade, said that although they were "classic cars" with incredible longevity, it was time to say goodbye.

        "We have trouble getting parts. They don't meet Americans With Disabilities (ADA) requirements like the new handicapped-accessible Silverliner Vs do," Walters said. "After over 40 years of service, they've come to the end of their life span. I only hope the new ones last as long."
        [end text]
        The "disappearing railroad blues" referred to in the lead sentences of the story is from the song, "City of New Orleans":
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OfxoM6trtZE
        Here are the lyrics:
        "The City of New Orleans
        by Steve Goodman

        Riding on the City of New Orleans,
        Illinois Central Monday morning rail
        Fifteen cars and fifteen restless riders,
        Three conductors and twenty-five sacks of mail.
        All along the southbound odyssey
        The train pulls out at Kankakee
        Rolls along past houses, farms and fields.
        Passin' trains that have no names,
        Freight yards full of old black men
        And the graveyards of the rusted automobiles.

        CHORUS:
        Good morning America how are you?
        Don't you know me I'm your native son,
        I'm the train they call The City of New Orleans,
        I'll be gone five hundred miles when the day is done.

        Dealin' card games with the old men in the club car.
        Penny a point ain't no one keepin' score.
        Pass the paper bag that holds the bottle
        Feel the wheels rumblin' 'neath the floor.
        And the sons of pullman porters
        And the sons of engineers
        Ride their father's magic carpets made of steel.
        Mothers with their babes asleep,
        Are rockin' to the gentle beat
        And the rhythm of the rails is all they feel.

        CHORUS

        Nighttime on The City of New Orleans,
        Changing cars in Memphis, Tennessee.
        Half way home, we'll be there by morning
        Through the Mississippi darkness
        Rolling down to the sea.
        And all the towns and people seem
        To fade into a bad dream
        And the steel rails still ain't heard the news.
        The conductor sings his song again,
        The passengers will please refrain
        This train's got the disappearing railroad blues.

        Good night, America, how are you?
        Don't you know me I'm your native son,
        I'm the train they call The City of New Orleans,
        I'll be gone five hundred miles when the day is done.
        http://www.arlo.net/resources/lyrics/new-orleans.shtml
        -----
        Edward B. Havens
        Tucson, Ariz.






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • JOHN AND LUCIA ALMEIDA
        I believe it was the acquisition of the push-pull sets in the late 1980 s that led to the retirement of the Blueliners. I was still taking the train back then
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 2, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          I believe it was the acquisition of the push-pull sets in the late 1980's that led to the retirement of the Blueliners. I was still taking the train back then and remember being in Suburban Station when they announced on a Friday evening that a train (departing for Elwyn IIRC) would be the last open window commuter run in North America. I was waiting for the R7 to Trenton and if I had thought about it, would have dashed over to take a ride, but didn't.

          John 

          --- On Mon, 7/2/12, Ken Houseal <khouseal_1@...> wrote:

          From: Ken Houseal <khouseal_1@...>
          Subject: RE: [Lansdale] Philadelphia - Daily News story on aging Silverliners' retirement
          To: lansdale_rails@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, July 2, 2012, 10:16 PM


          Ed,
          Thanks for the post. I rode them when they were new. Gee! No SEPTA then. Wow! What a thrill compared to the old green Reading MU's. For the record this was way before the Reading rebuilt some of their original cars into air conditioned "Blueliners"! Reporter error, the Silverliner II & IIIs did NOT replace Blueliners. The Blueliners only took up the slack until the "Center City Commuter Tunnel" was built and the Silverliner IVs arrived in droves replacing Blueliners. Anyone remember seeing Reading MUs both green and blue in freight trains going to Reading for major repairs? I do. I'll miss the variety that the old cars offered in the seemingly endless daily parade of Silverliner IV and now Korean Silverliner Vs. A far cry from the late and lamented Reading MU's. I miss them already.
          Ken




          To: Lansdale_rails@yahoogroups.com
          From: edhavens@...
          Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2012 02:00:29 +0000
          Subject: [Lansdale] Philadelphia - Daily News story on aging Silverliners' retirement

           



          Philadelphia Daily News posted a story Monday about the retirement and last runs of the final two electric multiple-unit [eMU] Silverliner commuter coaches built in the 1960s. SEPTA operated the Silverliner II and III series cars for the final time June 29:
          http://tinyurl.com/89was7w
          "Posted: Mon, Jul. 2, 2012, 5:37 AM
          One last ride on SEPTA's retiring Silverliners
          By Dan Geringer
          Daily News Staff Writer
          Philadelphia Daily News

          (photo caption)
          Larry Ryan, of Norristown, has been operating the retiring Silverliners for 33 years and says he'll miss them. PHOTOS: DAN GERINGER / DAILY NEWS STAFF
          (gallery - 2 images)

          (article)
          FAWAIZ CLEMENS and Christopher Henderson, both 21, traveled to Philly from New York City on Friday just to ride the last Silverliner II and Silverliner III cars in SEPTA Regional Rail service, making their final run from Suburban Station to Bala Cynwyd before, as Arlo Gutherie sang, "this train's got the disappearing railroad blues."

          "I've been like this with trains since I was 2 years old," Clemens said. "I want to be a train operator or a bus operator or a cleaner or a custodian — just anything to work in a transit company."

          "This train has been here since the civil-rights movement. Just riding in it makes me feel great."

          Both Clemens and Henderson rode the "Last Train to Cynwyd" Friday from noon until its final run about 8 p.m.

          So did R.L. Eastwood Jr., president of the National Railway Historical Society's Philadelphia chapter, who shared a Silverliner memory with Larry Ryan, of Norristown, a SEPTA engineer who has been operating Silverliners for 33 years.

          "I was at Jenkintown station when the first Silverliner IIs were delivered from the Budd Company on Red Lion Road for testing before they were put into passenger service," Eastwood said.

          Ryan said he was there, too.

          "You going to miss them?" Eastwood asked.

          "When you've operated something for 33 years and suddenly it's gone," Ryan said, "you miss it."

          Eastwood said that Silverliner II railcar No. 9010 was built in 1963 by Budd, while the attached Silverliner III railcar No. 235 was built in 1967 by the St. Louis Car Company — both of them vast improvements over the 1930s-built Reading Blueliners they replaced.

          Ryan said Philadelphia commuters had never seen anything like those early Silverliners. "They had air-conditioning, faster acceleration, better braking, comfortable seats and heat like you were in your room at home," he said. "I enjoyed being a part of industrial development that was ahead of its time."

          George Walters, SEPTA's assistant director of operations, who has "spent thousands of hours behind the throttle" of the Silverliner IIs and IIIs in the past decade, said that although they were "classic cars" with incredible longevity, it was time to say goodbye.

          "We have trouble getting parts. They don't meet Americans With Disabilities (ADA) requirements like the new handicapped-accessible Silverliner Vs do," Walters said. "After over 40 years of service, they've come to the end of their life span. I only hope the new ones last as long."
          [end text]
          The "disappearing railroad blues" referred to in the lead sentences of the story is from the song, "City of New Orleans":
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OfxoM6trtZE
          Here are the lyrics:
          "The City of New Orleans
          by Steve Goodman

          Riding on the City of New Orleans,
          Illinois Central Monday morning rail
          Fifteen cars and fifteen restless riders,
          Three conductors and twenty-five sacks of mail.
          All along the southbound odyssey
          The train pulls out at Kankakee
          Rolls along past houses, farms and fields.
          Passin' trains that have no names,
          Freight yards full of old black men
          And the graveyards of the rusted automobiles.

          CHORUS:
          Good morning America how are you?
          Don't you know me I'm your native son,
          I'm the train they call The City of New Orleans,
          I'll be gone five hundred miles when the day is done.

          Dealin' card games with the old men in the club car.
          Penny a point ain't no one keepin' score.
          Pass the paper bag that holds the bottle
          Feel the wheels rumblin' 'neath the floor.
          And the sons of pullman porters
          And the sons of engineers
          Ride their father's magic carpets made of steel.
          Mothers with their babes asleep,
          Are rockin' to the gentle beat
          And the rhythm of the rails is all they feel.

          CHORUS

          Nighttime on The City of New Orleans,
          Changing cars in Memphis, Tennessee.
          Half way home, we'll be there by morning
          Through the Mississippi darkness
          Rolling down to the sea.
          And all the towns and people seem
          To fade into a bad dream
          And the steel rails still ain't heard the news.
          The conductor sings his song again,
          The passengers will please refrain
          This train's got the disappearing railroad blues.

          Good night, America, how are you?
          Don't you know me I'm your native son,
          I'm the train they call The City of New Orleans,
          I'll be gone five hundred miles when the day is done.
          http://www.arlo.net/resources/lyrics/new-orleans.shtml
          -----
          Edward B. Havens
          Tucson, Ariz.




                                   

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Joe
          I remember hearing after the last scheduled run of the Blues... they got commandeered to do a Chestnut Hill East round trip as a protect train for Silverliners
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 3, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            I remember hearing after the last scheduled run of the Blues... they got commandeered to do a Chestnut Hill East round trip as a protect train for Silverliners that died coming down from Trenton.  They made the round trip and got swapped out for Silverliners in Center City, and that was the end....

            Actually, now that I think about it, the edition of Cinders that came out a month after the Blues were retired had the story.... I should see if I still have that one....

            Joe



            --- On Mon, 7/2/12, JOHN AND LUCIA ALMEIDA <jnlcubed@...> wrote:

            From: JOHN AND LUCIA ALMEIDA <jnlcubed@...>
            Subject: RE: [Lansdale] Philadelphia - Daily News story on aging Silverliners' retirement
            To: Lansdale_rails@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, July 2, 2012, 10:58 PM

            I believe it was the acquisition of the push-pull sets in the late 1980's that led to the retirement of the Blueliners. I was still taking the train back then and remember being in Suburban Station when they announced on a Friday evening that a train (departing for Elwyn IIRC) would be the last open window commuter run in North America. I was waiting for the R7 to Trenton and if I had thought about it, would have dashed over to take a ride, but didn't.

            John 

            --- On Mon, 7/2/12, Ken Houseal <khouseal_1@...> wrote:

            From: Ken Houseal <khouseal_1@...>
            Subject: RE: [Lansdale] Philadelphia - Daily News story on aging Silverliners' retirement
            To: lansdale_rails@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, July 2, 2012, 10:16 PM


            Ed,
            Thanks for the post. I rode them when they were new. Gee! No SEPTA then. Wow! What a thrill compared to the old green Reading MU's. For the record this was way before the Reading rebuilt some of their original cars into air conditioned "Blueliners"! Reporter error, the Silverliner II & IIIs did NOT replace Blueliners. The Blueliners only took up the slack until the "Center City Commuter Tunnel" was built and the Silverliner IVs arrived in droves replacing Blueliners. Anyone remember seeing Reading MUs both green and blue in freight trains going to Reading for major repairs? I do. I'll miss the variety that the old cars offered in the seemingly endless daily parade of Silverliner IV and now Korean Silverliner Vs. A far cry from the late and lamented Reading MU's. I miss them already.
            Ken




            To: Lansdale_rails@yahoogroups.com
            From: edhavens@...
            Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2012 02:00:29 +0000
            Subject: [Lansdale] Philadelphia - Daily News story on aging Silverliners' retirement

             



            Philadelphia Daily News posted a story Monday about the retirement and last runs of the final two electric multiple-unit [eMU] Silverliner commuter coaches built in the 1960s. SEPTA operated the Silverliner II and III series cars for the final time June 29:
            http://tinyurl.com/89was7w
            "Posted: Mon, Jul. 2, 2012, 5:37 AM
            One last ride on SEPTA's retiring Silverliners
            By Dan Geringer
            Daily News Staff Writer
            Philadelphia Daily News

            (photo caption)
            Larry Ryan, of Norristown, has been operating the retiring Silverliners for 33 years and says he'll miss them. PHOTOS: DAN GERINGER / DAILY NEWS STAFF
            (gallery - 2 images)

            (article)
            FAWAIZ CLEMENS and Christopher Henderson, both 21, traveled to Philly from New York City on Friday just to ride the last Silverliner II and Silverliner III cars in SEPTA Regional Rail service, making their final run from Suburban Station to Bala Cynwyd before, as Arlo Gutherie sang, "this train's got the disappearing railroad blues."

            "I've been like this with trains since I was 2 years old," Clemens said. "I want to be a train operator or a bus operator or a cleaner or a custodian — just anything to work in a transit company."

            "This train has been here since the civil-rights movement. Just riding in it makes me feel great."

            Both Clemens and Henderson rode the "Last Train to Cynwyd" Friday from noon until its final run about 8 p.m.

            So did R.L. Eastwood Jr., president of the National Railway Historical Society's Philadelphia chapter, who shared a Silverliner memory with Larry Ryan, of Norristown, a SEPTA engineer who has been operating Silverliners for 33 years.

            "I was at Jenkintown station when the first Silverliner IIs were delivered from the Budd Company on Red Lion Road for testing before they were put into passenger service," Eastwood said.

            Ryan said he was there, too.

            "You going to miss them?" Eastwood asked.

            "When you've operated something for 33 years and suddenly it's gone," Ryan said, "you miss it."

            Eastwood said that Silverliner II railcar No. 9010 was built in 1963 by Budd, while the attached Silverliner III railcar No. 235 was built in 1967 by the St. Louis Car Company — both of them vast improvements over the 1930s-built Reading Blueliners they replaced.

            Ryan said Philadelphia commuters had never seen anything like those early Silverliners. "They had air-conditioning, faster acceleration, better braking, comfortable seats and heat like you were in your room at home," he said. "I enjoyed being a part of industrial development that was ahead of its time."

            George Walters, SEPTA's assistant director of operations, who has "spent thousands of hours behind the throttle" of the Silverliner IIs and IIIs in the past decade, said that although they were "classic cars" with incredible longevity, it was time to say goodbye.

            "We have trouble getting parts. They don't meet Americans With Disabilities (ADA) requirements like the new handicapped-accessible Silverliner Vs do," Walters said. "After over 40 years of service, they've come to the end of their life span. I only hope the new ones last as long."
            [end text]
            The "disappearing railroad blues" referred to in the lead sentences of the story is from the song, "City of New Orleans":
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OfxoM6trtZE
            Here are the lyrics:
            "The City of New Orleans
            by Steve Goodman

            Riding on the City of New Orleans,
            Illinois Central Monday morning rail
            Fifteen cars and fifteen restless riders,
            Three conductors and twenty-five sacks of mail.
            All along the southbound odyssey
            The train pulls out at Kankakee
            Rolls along past houses, farms and fields.
            Passin' trains that have no names,
            Freight yards full of old black men
            And the graveyards of the rusted automobiles.

            CHORUS:
            Good morning America how are you?
            Don't you know me I'm your native son,
            I'm the train they call The City of New Orleans,
            I'll be gone five hundred miles when the day is done.

            Dealin' card games with the old men in the club car.
            Penny a point ain't no one keepin' score.
            Pass the paper bag that holds the bottle
            Feel the wheels rumblin' 'neath the floor.
            And the sons of pullman porters
            And the sons of engineers
            Ride their father's magic carpets made of steel.
            Mothers with their babes asleep,
            Are rockin' to the gentle beat
            And the rhythm of the rails is all they feel.

            CHORUS

            Nighttime on The City of New Orleans,
            Changing cars in Memphis, Tennessee.
            Half way home, we'll be there by morning
            Through the Mississippi darkness
            Rolling down to the sea.
            And all the towns and people seem
            To fade into a bad dream
            And the steel rails still ain't heard the news.
            The conductor sings his song again,
            The passengers will please refrain
            This train's got the disappearing railroad blues.

            Good night, America, how are you?
            Don't you know me I'm your native son,
            I'm the train they call The City of New Orleans,
            I'll be gone five hundred miles when the day is done.
            http://www.arlo.net/resources/lyrics/new-orleans.shtml
            -----
            Edward B. Havens
            Tucson, Ariz.




                                     

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



            ------------------------------------

            Yahoo! Groups Links





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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