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RE: [LandCafe] Re: Motto / definition "Neither left nor right"

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  • Harry Pollard
    Roy Langston said: High school teachers aren t the enemy, so you aren t likely to come under attack when talking with them. But in the trench warfare of
    Message 1 of 37 , Jun 1, 2010
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      Roy Langston said:

       

      “High school teachers aren't the enemy, so you aren't
      likely to come under attack when talking with them.
      But in the trench warfare of Internet political and
      economic discussions where I am fighting, these are
      some typically derisive anti-Georgist salvos:”

       

      Probably, indulging in these knock-down, drag-out, battles on Usenet does more for the psyche than for the education of others. Best chance of a positive result of this scrapping is among those lurking rather than taking part. A good effort, which I am sure you provide, may influence them favorably in your direction. But no matter how cogent and forcefully you make your points to the Usenet people, it probably makes little difference to the outcome of the argument..

       

      A first rule of salesmanship is to attend your customers and best prospects first. Thus, time spent with teachers is much more profitable then haranguing on Usenet.

       

      But, if you enjoy it, so be it.

       

      Harry

       

      From: LandCafe@yahoogroups.com [mailto:LandCafe@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of roy_langston1
      Sent: Monday, May 31, 2010 2:07 PM
      To: LandCafe@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [LandCafe] Re: Motto / definition "Neither left nor right"

       

       

      --- In LandCafe@yahoogroups.com, "Harry Pollard" <henrygeorgeschool@...> wrote:

      > Over the course of our high school experience,
      > I have talked with many hundreds - perhaps thousands
      > - of teachers. I cannot recall any "derision"
      > coming from them. Either they knew about George and
      > regarded him favorably, or they didn't know much
      > about him and were interested in learning more.

      High school teachers aren't the enemy, so you aren't
      likely to come under attack when talking with them.
      But in the trench warfare of Internet political and
      economic discussions where I am fighting, these are
      some typically derisive anti-Georgist salvos:

      "Henry George's theories were based on land ownership
      and how far a business was from a public resource like
      a mill or waterway. The man lived and died a decade
      before the model T was produced much less modern
      transportation and communication. Not only did Henry
      George never hear of the Internet, he barely lived
      long enough to see the electric light. Applying the
      theories of Henry George to modern nations is about as
      risky as letting the most brilliant caveman design your
      next airport."

      "Get yourself published and spark off this new Georgist
      revolution! Truth of the matter is that you can't and
      Georgism is dead as an economic school."

      "[Another poster] surely knows of the irrelevance of
      Georgism in its economic blubberings. Georgists
      themselves acknowledge it."

      Blah, blah, blah.

      The term "Georgism" and Henry George become ways of
      changing the subject away from land rent recovery.

      -- Roy Langston

    • Harry Pollard
      Roy Langston said: High school teachers aren t the enemy, so you aren t likely to come under attack when talking with them. But in the trench warfare of
      Message 37 of 37 , Jun 1, 2010
      • 0 Attachment

        Roy Langston said:

         

        “High school teachers aren't the enemy, so you aren't
        likely to come under attack when talking with them.
        But in the trench warfare of Internet political and
        economic discussions where I am fighting, these are
        some typically derisive anti-Georgist salvos:”

         

        Probably, indulging in these knock-down, drag-out, battles on Usenet does more for the psyche than for the education of others. Best chance of a positive result of this scrapping is among those lurking rather than taking part. A good effort, which I am sure you provide, may influence them favorably in your direction. But no matter how cogent and forcefully you make your points to the Usenet people, it probably makes little difference to the outcome of the argument..

         

        A first rule of salesmanship is to attend your customers and best prospects first. Thus, time spent with teachers is much more profitable then haranguing on Usenet.

         

        But, if you enjoy it, so be it.

         

        Harry

         

        From: LandCafe@yahoogroups.com [mailto:LandCafe@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of roy_langston1
        Sent: Monday, May 31, 2010 2:07 PM
        To: LandCafe@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [LandCafe] Re: Motto / definition "Neither left nor right"

         

         

        --- In LandCafe@yahoogroups.com, "Harry Pollard" <henrygeorgeschool@...> wrote:

        > Over the course of our high school experience,
        > I have talked with many hundreds - perhaps thousands
        > - of teachers. I cannot recall any "derision"
        > coming from them. Either they knew about George and
        > regarded him favorably, or they didn't know much
        > about him and were interested in learning more.

        High school teachers aren't the enemy, so you aren't
        likely to come under attack when talking with them.
        But in the trench warfare of Internet political and
        economic discussions where I am fighting, these are
        some typically derisive anti-Georgist salvos:

        "Henry George's theories were based on land ownership
        and how far a business was from a public resource like
        a mill or waterway. The man lived and died a decade
        before the model T was produced much less modern
        transportation and communication. Not only did Henry
        George never hear of the Internet, he barely lived
        long enough to see the electric light. Applying the
        theories of Henry George to modern nations is about as
        risky as letting the most brilliant caveman design your
        next airport."

        "Get yourself published and spark off this new Georgist
        revolution! Truth of the matter is that you can't and
        Georgism is dead as an economic school."

        "[Another poster] surely knows of the irrelevance of
        Georgism in its economic blubberings. Georgists
        themselves acknowledge it."

        Blah, blah, blah.

        The term "Georgism" and Henry George become ways of
        changing the subject away from land rent recovery.

        -- Roy Langston

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