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Re: [LandCafe] Chicago Georgists?

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  • Wyn Achenbaum
    David, Ed Clarke, in Washington D.C., I believe, has a PhD from UofC in economics. Adele Wick did graduate work in economics at UofC. I don t think my MBA
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 5, 2010
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      David,

      Ed Clarke, in Washington D.C., I believe, has a PhD from UofC in economics.    Adele Wick did graduate work in economics at UofC. I don't think my MBA would exactly count, though it did include one economics course from Laffer.  (All three of us happen to be on the RSF board.)

      Homer Hoyt's "100 Years of Land Values in Chicago" was his 1933 PhD dissertation.  Milton and Rose Friedman and Paul Samuelson were there at the time, the latter as an undergrad, and I've assumed that they must have been at least somewhat familiar with it.  From Samuelson's recent NYT obit:

      He left high school at age 16 to enter the University of Chicago. “I was born as an economist on Jan. 2, 1932,” he said. That was the day he heard his first college lecture, on Thomas Malthus, the 18th-century British economist who studied the relation between poverty and population growth. Hooked, he began taking economics courses.

      The University of Chicago developed the century’s leading conservative economic theorists, under the later guidance of Milton Friedman. But Mr. Samuelson regarded the teaching at Chicago as “schizophrenic.” This was at the height of the Depression, and courses about the business cycle naturally talked about unemployment, he said. But in economic-theory classes, joblessness was not mentioned.

      “The niceties of existence were not a matter of concern,” he recalled, “yet everything around was closed down most of the time. If you lived in a middle-class community in Chicago, children and adults came daily to the door saying, ‘We are starving, how about a potato?’ I speak from poignant memory.”

      After receiving his bachelor’s degree from Chicago in 1935, he went to Harvard, where he was attracted to the ideas of the Harvard professor Alvin Hansen, the leading exponent of Keynesian theory in America.

      Wyn

      DavidH wrote:
       

      Is anybody aware of Georgist or Georgist-friendly economists or scholars with University of Chicago connections? (Undergrad or advanced degrees, professorships) So far I'm aware of Nic Tideman, Lowell Harriss, and Paul Romer at Stanford, the guy who is proposing Georgist-type charter cities.

      david harrell

    • DavidH
      Thanks, Wyn. (Anybody else know of others?) Interesting about the confluence of Hoyt, Friedman & Samuelson. And how Samuelson s introduction to economics was a
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 10, 2010
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        Thanks, Wyn.

        (Anybody else know of others?)

        Interesting about the confluence of Hoyt, Friedman & Samuelson.

        And how Samuelson's introduction to economics was a lecture on Malthus....

        david harrell.
      • Edward Dodson
        David Harrell wrote: (Anybody else know of others?) Interesting about the confluence of Hoyt, Friedman & Samuelson. And how Samuelson s introduction to
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 11, 2010
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          David Harrell wrote:

          (Anybody else know of others?)
          Interesting about the confluence of Hoyt, Friedman & Samuelson.
          And how Samuelson's introduction to economics was a lecture on Malthus....

          Ed Dodson here:
          For much of the first 30-40 years of the 20th century, Chicago rivaled New
          York as the largest center of "Henry George men" (and women) in the U.S.

          Francis Neilson (former British M.P., author of "How Diplomats Make War" and
          a long list of books thereafter) lived there for some time and lectured at
          the University of Chicago from time to time, as well as at the Henry George
          School in Chicago. Neilson and other "Henry George men" established a
          relationship of some sort with Robert M. Hutchins, President of the
          University of Chicago during the 1930s to the early 1950s.
        • DavidH
          Thanks, Ed. Also thanks for the encyclopedia of information you have collected at your site, which yielded several more names. - David Harrell
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 12, 2010
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            Thanks, Ed. Also thanks for the encyclopedia of information you have collected at your site, which yielded several more names.

            - David Harrell



            --- In LandCafe@yahoogroups.com, "Edward Dodson" <ejdodson@...> wrote:
            >
            > David Harrell wrote:
            >
            > (Anybody else know of others?)
            > Interesting about the confluence of Hoyt, Friedman & Samuelson.
            > And how Samuelson's introduction to economics was a lecture on Malthus....
            >
            > Ed Dodson here:
            > For much of the first 30-40 years of the 20th century, Chicago rivaled New
            > York as the largest center of "Henry George men" (and women) in the U.S.
            >
            > Francis Neilson (former British M.P., author of "How Diplomats Make War" and
            > a long list of books thereafter) lived there for some time and lectured at
            > the University of Chicago from time to time, as well as at the Henry George
            > School in Chicago. Neilson and other "Henry George men" established a
            > relationship of some sort with Robert M. Hutchins, President of the
            > University of Chicago during the 1930s to the early 1950s.
            >
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