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Re: The Laws of Supply and Demand

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  • David Chester
    Harry and All, The philosophy about which you are writing and thinking was first expressed more than 2,000 years ago by certain Jews whose job it was to make
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 29, 2004
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      Harry and All,

      The philosophy about which you are writing and thinking was first
      expressed more than 2,000 years ago by certain Jews whose job it was
      to make law and order and practice the giving of justice through the
      Sanhedrian. In particular one particular thinker who combined Greek
      and Biblical concepts was know as Hillel the Elder and who started
      the study of Torah from an analytic logical basis. (Incidently at
      about this time the first pre-Christian socialism thinking was also
      getting started, associated with the priestly family of Zadok and
      Mirriam, either Jesus's mother or aunt, and recorded I think, at
      the "Church of the Confrontation (meeting)".)

      One of Hillel's most famous quotes (when being taunted to summarize
      the Torah whilst standing on one leg) was about the well
      known "Golden Rule" where the corrolary he proposed was:

      "Don't do to your neighbour what you would not have him do to
      you".

      I have discussed this in greater detail elsewhere, see the archives
      of our Bannicker site, but here I want to point out that it covers
      the three things that you you mention, not causing offense to
      somebody else by restricting trade inside or between countries, not
      using priviledges to give unfair advantages and not stopping
      opportunities for production through land monopoly.

      This modification to the Golden Rule has transformed what basically
      was a microeconomic behavoural concept and rule (for personal
      guidence) into a macroeconomic one (to incorporate national
      goverment), simply by the introduction of the double negative. (This
      is one reason why I put emphasis on which of these views we take in
      our thoughts/analyses.)

      The socialists have taken the original Golden Rule, which largely
      relates to giving charity and making this policy national. George
      unknowingly followed Hillel's lead, and used the double negative
      principle in both his LVT and his free-trade proposals.

      By expressing our ideals in this most general way one can see that
      Georgists can only go a limited way with the socialist views. As
      George claimed in his dying explanation, that it was for the benefit
      of all men that these proposals were being made (and that they were
      not aimed at one kind of working class population).

      These ethics have the strongest appeal (for me at least) and they
      transcent all of the details about which I find in these columns we
      sometimes get bogged down. Unfortunately politics is not really
      ethical at all, with the result that a lot of energy is spent in
      providing less basic explanations. Even the Liberal style of
      politics diverges from this approach and it seems to me that part of
      our job should be trying to get it to go back.

      Regards, David Chester
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