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Re: [LandCafe] RE: New BBC Transport Programme

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  • Terence Bendixson
    Sean Interesting stuff. As you will know these ideas have been about since the 1960s. US DoT produced a report called Tomorrow s Transportation at that time
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 23, 2004
      Sean

      Interesting stuff. As you will know these ideas have been about since the
      1960s. US DoT produced a report called 'Tomorrow's Transportation' at that
      time and the case for 'pods' was neatly set out. Why have we not seen such
      systems come to pass?

      The most commonly cited problems are:

      a) The additional cost given that installing a car/highway system too
      will be unavoidable.
      b) The guideways may be slim and unobtrusive but the stations will be
      bigger and very expensive. You will need lifts to get to every one to comply
      with access for disabled people laws. Stations can be incorporated in some
      buildings but where will they be when the lines are running out amongst
      houses?
      c) Amongst houses there are likely to be problems of overlooking and
      privacy. Guideways will be at bedroom window level.
      d) Can ways be found to achieve suburban development at sufficient
      densities to give walking catchments at stops that will generate enough
      demand to keep capital costs within affordable limits?

      I am sure that others will be able to add to the list but it is as a result
      of such problems that Dutch and French companies are working on vehicles
      with on-board computers that follow magnets stuck to the road. Schipol
      Airport has driverless shuttle buses which go at about 5mph and which can
      stop if you step in front of them. Now the Dutch are fitting up a shuttle
      that links a metro stop to a nearby science park.

      Can such driverless vehicles be run on ordinary suburban roads mixed up with
      other vehicles? Good question. Maybe if all the conventional vehicles are
      operated under an Intelligent Speed Adaptation system. Maybe not.

      Regards

      Terence

      Terence Bendixson, Secretary
      Independent Transport Commission
      University of Southampton
      c/o 39 Elm Park Gardens, London SW10 9QF
      Tel 020 7352 3885






      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Sean Brooks" <seanbrooks@...>
      To: <LandCafe@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, September 23, 2004 3:22 AM
      Subject: RE: [LandCafe] RE: New BBC Transport Programme


      > Well, I've been a fan of transport systems, longer than I've been a fan of
      > LVT. In fact, it was my interest in alternatives to the automobile that
      led
      > me to find LVT: I used to commute an hour each way to a job 15 miles from
      > my home, but that's the US Capitol Beltway at rush hour for you. The jump
      I
      > made to LVT was my own thinking on how to do 'Transit Oriented
      Development'
      > in a market-efficient manner...how to get as much 'liveable' space next to
      > transit stops.
      >
      > Except for the largest cities, non-bus rapid transit is typically designed
      > for getting commuters in and out of the downtown area. Such a design
      makes
      > an automobile necessary for non-commuting trips. Also, as an area matures,
      > jobs & houses become intermingled, and don't always conform to the
      original
      > planned development. A network is necessary. My previous job required me
      > to commute 15 miles from one Maryland suburb of Washington, DC to another.
      > Taking the Metro would add 15 minutes to my trip, and further
      inconvenience.
      >
      > Anyway, the concept of Personal Rapid Transit has always intrigued me:
      low
      > capital costs for area covered, direct routing, no transfers, little
      > waiting, 24h service, few empty moving seats (a problem with buses and
      > trains in off-peak hours). Alas, it's never been done right. A few less
      > than optimal designs, and opposition from a well entrenched light-rail
      > lobby, have kept the lid pretty tight on it.
      >
      > For those of you who are not familiar, let me introduce you to what my
      > friends like to refer to as "the pod system". PRT is basically like a
      > horizontal, networked, private elevator. You go to a station, pay your
      > fare, select your destination, sit in the 'pod' and the system whisks you
      > off to your destination, with no transfers, delays, or traffic. Here's a
      > website that can explain it better than I can:
      > http://www.skywebexpress.com/the_system.shtml
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Please think twice before posting to the group as a whole
      > (It might be that your note is best sent to one person?)
      > To post message to group: LandCafe@yahoogroups.com
      > To unsubscribe: LandCafe-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > Consult Value Capture Initiative at: http://ecoplan.org
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Sean Brooks" <seanbrooks@...>
      To: <LandCafe@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, September 23, 2004 3:22 AM
      Subject: RE: [LandCafe] RE: New BBC Transport Programme


      > Well, I've been a fan of transport systems, longer than I've been a fan of
      > LVT. In fact, it was my interest in alternatives to the automobile that
      led
      > me to find LVT: I used to commute an hour each way to a job 15 miles from
      > my home, but that's the US Capitol Beltway at rush hour for you. The jump
      I
      > made to LVT was my own thinking on how to do 'Transit Oriented
      Development'
      > in a market-efficient manner...how to get as much 'liveable' space next to
      > transit stops.
      >
      > Except for the largest cities, non-bus rapid transit is typically designed
      > for getting commuters in and out of the downtown area. Such a design
      makes
      > an automobile necessary for non-commuting trips. Also, as an area matures,
      > jobs & houses become intermingled, and don't always conform to the
      original
      > planned development. A network is necessary. My previous job required me
      > to commute 15 miles from one Maryland suburb of Washington, DC to another.
      > Taking the Metro would add 15 minutes to my trip, and further
      inconvenience.
      >
      > Anyway, the concept of Personal Rapid Transit has always intrigued me:
      low
      > capital costs for area covered, direct routing, no transfers, little
      > waiting, 24h service, few empty moving seats (a problem with buses and
      > trains in off-peak hours). Alas, it's never been done right. A few less
      > than optimal designs, and opposition from a well entrenched light-rail
      > lobby, have kept the lid pretty tight on it.
      >
      > For those of you who are not familiar, let me introduce you to what my
      > friends like to refer to as "the pod system". PRT is basically like a
      > horizontal, networked, private elevator. You go to a station, pay your
      > fare, select your destination, sit in the 'pod' and the system whisks you
      > off to your destination, with no transfers, delays, or traffic. Here's a
      > website that can explain it better than I can:
      > http://www.skywebexpress.com/the_system.shtml
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Please think twice before posting to the group as a whole
      > (It might be that your note is best sent to one person?)
      > To post message to group: LandCafe@yahoogroups.com
      > To unsubscribe: LandCafe-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      > Consult Value Capture Initiative at: http://ecoplan.org
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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