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  • Wetzel Dave
    nb Dave Dave Wetzel Tel: 0207 941 4200 ... From: Paul Nicolson [mailto:zacchaeus2000@blueyonder.co.uk] Sent: 13 September 2004 10:11 To: Wetzel Dave Cc:
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 13, 2004
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      Dave
      Dave Wetzel
      Tel: 0207 941 4200




      -----Original Message-----
      From: Paul Nicolson [mailto:zacchaeus2000@...]
      Sent: 13 September 2004 10:11
      To: Wetzel Dave
      Cc: Antswin@...; Peter Ambrose
      Subject: Re: from Antonia


      Dear Dave Wetzel,

      Following up Antonia's e-mail here are the details you asked for.

      Filling the vacuum – new directions for national housing policy.
      Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1 R4RL
      9.30 am – 4.30 pm, Friday 15th October 2005.
      £150 organisations not registered as charities, £75 registered charities,
      £25 individuals, £5 unwaged.

      Registration form from <mailto:anna@...>
      anna@... or
      Zacchaeus 2000 Trust, Conference Office, 73 Lansdowne Road, Tottenham,
      London N17 ONN - 020 8801 3014

      Last year we met Tony Blair about poverty in the UK and followed up with a
      memorandum on minimum income standards behalf of the 66 NGOs in the Z2K
      coalition. He offered continuing dialogue with us through Lord Morris of
      Manchester who led our delegation. I am mailing a copy of the memo to you
      today.

      It became clear during the writing of the memo that our next memo should be
      about housing so we have set up the seminar in the attached flyer and
      registration form. Peter Ambrose, who edited the first memo, is a housing
      specialist and has drafted a starting point for the next memo that I have
      set out below for ease of access.

      As you know Antonia Swinson is Chairing the seminar. It will cover ethics,
      stress, affordability and ecology. The speakers are,

      The Problem Robina Rafferty MBE - Housing Justice
      Ethics 1. Monetary Justice, Rev Peter Challen, Christian Council for
      Monetary Justice
      Ethics 2. Ethical finance Iqbal Asaria, Chairman, Economics Committee,
      Muslim Council of Great Britain
      Affordability. Chris Cook, Partnership Consulting
      Stress. Professor Sian Griffiths, Royal College of Physicians
      Ecological living. Bill Dunster, BedZED
      Political, practical and academic work to be done. Professor Peter Ambrose
      Zacchaeus 2000 Trust

      We would be very grateful for anything you can do the draw all this to the
      attention of opinion formers and encourage them to publicise and attend the
      seminar.

      With best wishes,

      Yours sincerely

      Paul Nicolson,

      Rev Paul Nicolson, Chairman,
      Zacchaeus 2000 Trust,
      93 Campbell Road
      London N17 0AX
      020 83765455
      0796 1177889




      Professor Peter Ambrose – suggested starting point of some contents for the
      Zacchaeus 2000 memorandum to the Prime Minister about affordable housing,
      for discussion, expansion and elaboration with input from other speakers on
      the 15th October.

      British Housing: Massive Debt + No Strategy = More Poverty + Ill Health

      1. MASSIVE HOUSING DEBT AND ITS EFFECTS

      House price levels and rents are largely conditioned by house purchase
      lending volumes.

      There has been a massive escalation of outstanding housing debt since 1980,
      especially since the 1987 deregulation; the 1980 figure inflated to 2004,
      and allowing for the growth of owner occupancy, should be c.£155bn – the
      actual current figure is £800+bn.

      This is way out of line with other EU countries as a % of GDP; this
      complicates our joining the EM system and other economic issues.

      This has happened because lenders have adopted so-called ‘generous’
      policies, i.e. they have increased repayment periods, used higher
      loan/income multiples, counted more of the ‘second income’, even induced
      people to overstate their incomes, etc.

      There is an evidenced overlap of interests between the lending industry and
      the land/development industry – it’s like me lending you more and more to
      buy something from me – good for me, not so good for you.

      There is a wide range of adverse effects for rich and poor:


      inflated and volatile development land values (so land becomes a speculative
      commodity rather than an input to housing production, which is still at
      historically low levels)

      high house values mean landlords seek higher rents for a competitive return
      on value

      higher rents squeeze amount left in low incomes to buy basic needs for
      healthy living

      effects on spending on other health-promoting necessities such as recreation
      and holidays

      no provision of affordable housing for large rent paying families brings
      overcrowding,

      increased homelessness and higher emergency housing costs

      ‘buy to rent’ and speculative activity bids up prices and rents in some
      areas

      lack of affordable housing affects labour mobility and job chances

      reduction of capability to go on strike due to mortgage commitments reduces
      the power of organized labour

      effects on fertility rate, the age of having a first child and family size
      increased stresses on family life where two incomes are needed to service
      debt

      complications when life goes wrong (divorce, unemployment, etc.) means more
      stress

      effects on the life quality of older parents helping children to cope with
      housing costs

      the extra £645bn that has been used to push up house prices that could have
      been used more productively as investment in health, education,
      infrastructure, etc.

      2. NO STRATEGY

      There is no clear UK Housing Strategy – only successive ‘crisis management’
      measures. There is no recognition that housing is key economic
      infrastructure and that sufficient good standard, healthy, affordable
      housing when and where it is needed is a vital prerequisite for buoyant
      economic development and a healthy and socially integrated population. There
      is no recognition that failure to meet these requirements has severe public
      cost consequences in the NHS and Schools (see Zacchaeus 2000 - Memorandum to
      the Prime Minister, 2004).

      There is no strategic thinking and policy formation on:

      matching aggregate house purchase lending to housing

      outputmatching statutory minimum incomes to increasing housing costs

      achieving a cost-effective mix of supply side/demand side support

      avoiding expensive technological errors (e.g. the ‘high rise’ boom, poor
      insulation, etc.)

      matching housing promotion patterns to the full diversity of local needs

      achieving a non-stigmatising mix of private/voluntary/public development

      whether housing support should be progressive, regressive or neutral in
      effect


      3. THE POOR SUFFER MOST – AND WHAT THAT COSTS

      The massive increase in debt and the lack of strategic thinking impacts most
      on the poor.

      They pay a higher % of income in housing costs and council tax and have not
      enough left to cover all other vital expenditure to safeguard their health
      and safety.

      They are driven further into debt at high interest, experience more stress
      and other ill-health related to poor housing and they generate, unwittingly,
      higher NHS costs.

      Low income rent payers do not own property and have no ‘asset cushion’.

      Many live in areas of housing run-down that produces adverse ‘area effects’
      on other services such as retailing, health and education.

      They suffer from a range of outcomes not of their making. Morally and
      economically this is a disgrace. Radically new approaches are required to
      housing finance, setting the levels of statutory minimum incomes and
      strategies.

      Peter Ambrose.

      University of Brighton 01 273 643 914
      Home 01 273 471 869


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Wetzel Dave" < <mailto:Davewetzel@...> Davewetzel@...>
      To: < <mailto:Antswin@...> Antswin@...>
      Sent: Friday, September 10, 2004 3:35 PM
      Subject: RE: from Antonia


      Will do. (Sounds good).
      Is there a programme?
      Any charge for entrance?


      Dave
      Dave Wetzel; Vice-Chair; Transport for London.
      Windsor House. 42-50 Victoria Street. London. SW1H 0TL. UK
      Tel: 020 7941 4200
      Intl Tel: +44 207 941 4200

      Windsor House is close to New Scotland Yard. Buses 11, 24, 148 and 211 pass
      the door. (507 passes close by).
      Nearest Tube: St. James's Park Underground station.
      Nearest mainline stations: Waterloo and Victoria (Both a walk or short bus
      ride).
      Public cycle parking available outside Windsor House.






      -----Original Message-----
      From: <mailto:Antswin@...> Antswin@... [mailto:Antswin@...]
      Sent: 10 September 2004 11:18
      To: Wetzel Dave
      Subject: from Antonia


      Dave Would you kindly forward this to anyone you anyone who might be
      interested? I'm down chairing it. Have a nice w/e. love Antonia
      -------------------------------------
      Filling the vacuum
      A new direction for national housing policy
      Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, London WC1 R4RL
      9.30 am – 5.30 pm, Friday 15th October 2004

      In the Zacchaeus 2000 coalition memorandum to the Prime Minister (ISBN
      0-9546779-1-9 February 2004) we emphasised that the growing proportion of
      housing costs in statutory minimum incomes is rendering any headline BHC
      (before housing costs are deducted) measure of poverty increasingly invalid
      in the UK.

      The increase in housing costs has squeezed the minimum incomes that remain
      to buy food, clothing, fuel, transport and all other necessities. It
      discourages people from moving into work, and, in some cases, causes rent
      and council tax debts, and draconian enforcement of the same, when tax
      credits provide an income in work, after the costs of rent and council tax,
      lower than it would have been in unemployment.

      Policy should not only be concerned about the minimum incomes needed for
      healthy living but also concerned about a housing market that is out of
      control and undoing the improvements in income levels that are being
      attempted, and in some cases achieved but in others neglected, by
      government. It is possible to spend so much money buying or renting a house
      that there is not enough left over to save for an adequate pension.

      We have therefore set up the Seminar on Friday October the 15th to take a
      fresh look at these issues from the point of view of the ethical finance,
      stress on households and the consequent ill health, affordability and the
      environment. We will be preparing a further memorandum to the Prime
      Minister.

      I hope you will consider coming or sending a representative.

      With best wishes,

      Paul Nicolson,

      Rev Paul Nicolson,
      Zacchaeus 2000 Trust,
      93 Campbell Road,
      London N17 0AX
      020 83765455
      0796 1177889





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